102 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 6-5-21

  1. Apinun Mumsee. Nice day here. The suv would not start so I got quite a walk today. Went to the bottom of the hill for the craft market. Nice that they put things on the tables instead of on the ground as they usually do. I kept looking at things and thinking about weight in the suitcase when I leave. I did get one very nice bilum and a wide weave market bag. I asked if they had a number 2 price and saved some money. Never hurts to ask. Then I walked to a yard sale but didn’t get anything. Then it was up a steep hill to home.

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  2. Everyone said “Good Morning” but Jo.
    Fore everyone else it was still night.
    i.e. They said “Good Morning” and went to bed.
    So”
    Hello again and Good Morning everyone but Jol
    A couple of hours left in your day Jo. Then
    Good Night.
    I always check the news-first thing.
    It is about Coronavirus (or somesuch). That means nothing is happening.
    That is good news.

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  3. I said happy afternoon since that is the time of day it was for me. I love that they say apinun here. Now I will say “Good night, Chas.”
    I would love to share the post that I put up on facebook today so Chas could see it. Perhaps Donna knows how to share that. It is a picture of me with the class I have been teaching for the last two weeks or so. Four of the children I have taught in kinder. One of them in the middle front is one of the girls that I am tutoring. Four of them are four of the five quints. And it is delightfully silly as I am making a silly face since I thought that my friend said to make a silly face, but no one else is. The class looks great and you can see how much they enjoy each other. It is a small group as several left early for furlough. From 18 down to 12.

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  4. I had signed off. Was ready to go . but I saw on TV that they were holding China accountable for the spread of the virus.
    Question: What are they going to do to China?

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  5. Cute photo Jo

    I believe a post can only be shared if it’s a public post (rather than limited to a group of friends) on FB. You just have to then click on the post’s time stamp and then copy and paste the url here — then it should reproduce

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  6. Good morning.

    Busy day today. Grandson1 (GS1) has a baseball game in a half hour. Granddaughter2 (GD2) has a dance recital this afternoon. GD1 left with others for a soccer game 100 miles away. If she wins she has another game tomorrow.

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  7. The header photo is a bird AJ was getting good photos of well before I ever could, the green heron. Before moving here, I had only ever seen the bird five or six times. But lo and behold, I have a pond just half a mile from my home where I have not only seen two or more adult green herons at one time, but some years they bring their juveniles.

    There is a little path down to the pond, probably made by geese and muskrats and snakes going down to the pond (having seen all of those use the trail to get into the pond), and I myself take it and stand next to where the ground dips away a couple of feet to the pond.

    Last week the pond got very dry, down to just a big puddle. In the couple of weeks leading up to that, as the pond level went down, I was this close to the green heron three or four times. And “this close” means within ten or twelve feet, maybe as close as eight once or twice. On this occasion, there was a snake in the water, just at the edge, and I took a photo or two and moved closer. The snake left, but I looked over and the heron was just as close to me as the snake had been, but the heron didn’t leave. I have often photographed turtles on this same log, but I have to photograph them from the sidewalk above; turtles don’t hang around for their picture to be taken.

    This is the fluffed-up version of the green heron, with its feathers ruffled and its crest raised a bit. In this pose, it is almost impossible to imagine that this bird is a heron and that it has a long neck, but it does. It just normally keeps it retracted. This is a small heron, about the size of a crow, and it usually seems to feed by stalking around and grabbing whatever it gets close enough to grab. Sometimes it stands on a log above the water and reaches out its long neck to grab something in the water.

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  8. Once saw a woman in a grocery checkout in the city use a bilum to carry her groceries. The handle goes in the head like a scarf or headband and the bag hangs down the back. Like the clever African method of carrying burdens on the head, the bilum is an energy efficient way of carrying burdens, but requires better balance and posture than most Westerners have.

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  9. Working the new schedule means more days of work each week. It is a bit stressful right now, as we are still short-staffed and I am currently the most senior nurse in the clinic.

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  10. This past week, dear friend and relative sent me some music books. My mother and father were delighted, because they are old Reader’s Digest compilations of popular songs. Our piano teacher had the same books, and we would borrow them and play them for my parents, as they were published in their era and so have all the songs they knew. I was to have inherited them from my teacher, who wanted me to have her music, but her children gave me her classical records instead. So now we have those old songs to play again. This is the first one my mother requested me to play:

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  11. G’day, all!
    I shopped at Publix and still see everyone in masks. I talked to another friend who is out a lot more than I am, and she said how it is elsewhere in the community is that everyone is tired of the masks and has stopped wearing them. I still feel all muddle minded about the masks. People at the bank were wearing them yesterday. I feel pretty attached to mask wearing while grocery shopping, not only against Covid, but with so many people from various places in this area it seems like an extra protection against who knows what is out there.

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  12. Hi, all! I’ve been reading daily and praying, but not commenting because I’ve been busy at work this week.

    I should be able to get my second vaccination in a couple of weeks if the province gets all the vaccine that it has been promised.

    In the meantime, we’re busy planning for our camper registration to open up. It’s very hard to know just what weeks to open as our staffing is just not going well. We also need a new chef, a new site manager, never mind the cabin leaders and program staff. I’m glad I’m not one of the directors, but I can pray for them.

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  13. The whole ‘reopening’ process could be an interesting mine field to navigate. I expect many grocery and other stores here to continue requiring masks. If one is vaccinated, there’s really no need (in my view); but there’s no way to know who’s vaccinated or not, so in places where crowds still mix, masks will continue to be the norm.

    Most of us are “used to it,” of course, although I actually have forgotten a mask a couple times — once the security person at the grocery store had to get one for me; the other time I hadn’t yet gotten to the UPS store when I remembered and had time to just go back to my car and grab the mask. I now carry them with me, just in case I forget again.

    Outside, no mask for me unless I’m in some kind of public “crowd” situation.

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  14. Businesses are mostly still requiring masks, at least out here. My credit union, grocery stores, any other public business — they still have signs saying masks are required inside.

    I personally find them stifling and am relieved to pull them off once I’m back in my car.

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  15. Beautiful sunny day here, which is rare. A gift from God for those who are leaving this week. All of the graduating seniors will probably never return.

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  16. Good afternoon! It is a hot one here today….out here in the forest we got up to 82….in town it was 93!
    This afternoon I attended a baby shower of a precious young woman who is 36 and having her first. I attended her wedding two years ago and it was just the loveliest wedding. It is a blessing to watch her taking those steps upon the path our Lord has laid before her.

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  17. nope, Chas, I posted that at probably 7:45 in the morning. You went the wrong direction on your hours. I am a day ahead, but ten hours behind. Which makes no sense at all, but that is how I figure it. It is now 9:45am on Sunday morning here.

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  18. I am done with masks except at the hospital or clinic. I have not entered a couple of stores still requiring them. I think there was only one person who wore a mask at the funeral we were at yesterday.

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  19. Hey all.

    Just wanted to let you all know.

    My Mother in law has been sent home on hospice. She has requested we visit one last time, so we are leaving first thing in the AM. I will post from the road until further notice, so won’t be around much. Prayer for my wife, daughter, BIL and MIL would be appreciated.

    Thanks folks, see yas’ soon.

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  20. In doing research for this book project, I came across the digitization of a remarkable document, written in 1802 by one of the pastors in my denomination, against the slavery then legal in America. I’d read quotes from it but just now found out it’s available online. It’s only a few pages, but well worth reading something from well before the Civil War that made a very strong case: https://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/14/alexander-mcleods-sermon-on-negro-slavery-unjustifiable

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  21. What a great find, Cheryl (10:56). I look forward to reading that later this weekend.

    I dropped off my union ballot in the mail, they’re due back to the Labor Board by Friday. I decided to go to a post office in one of the beach cities about 10 miles north just to get out for a drive, it was such a beautiful day — saw several horseback riders, folks eating outdoors at cafes along the beach (no masks) and a wonderful sign hanging on a shop window: “Cloth Mask Clearance.”

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  22. You know those dramatic reactions to the second vaccine? I got them – fever, chills, muscle aches. It hit me yesterday evening. May need to call in sick for tomorrow, as still feeling the effects. Oh well, at least I know it’s working. I couldn’t help thinking though, if this is a sample of what me getting sick with actual COVID would be like, it is a good thing I got vaccinated instead, or I would be one of those who were dangerously ill.

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  23. Morning! It is a rather humid morning for Colorado…we had a front move through last night with some fantastic lightening and thunder…the clouds were eerily beautiful!
    Aj we cover your family in prayer and ask that our Lord will minister to your MIL with grace and mercy ♥️
    Speaking of the shot, Paul and I both received ours. I was not going to get one but awakened one morning sensing it was something I needed to do…no one was more surprised than me at the turn of events. I have had both of my shots and the second one was much more “interesting” than the first. I felt like I had a fever but did not after the second. I had foggy brain and was extremely fatigued for several days. I had great pain in my arm and the pain moved from the top of my arm to underneath to my breast. My fingers on that side went numb. It lasted several days.

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  24. I took my temperature, and I was at the high end of normal, so technically I didn’t have a fever (although, my body temperature runs lower generally), but I feel warm.

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  25. My reactions after the 2nd shot were minimal — no fever, just a headache that hung on and (more noticeable) a lot of fatigue. Lasted about 24 hours, probably less.

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  26. I’d read a couple articles about “why” these responses occur beforehand so it wasn’t alarming to me. Our editors know that if someone’s getting a 2nd shot, it may come with a sick day afterward.

    Sleep was the best medicine.

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  27. Like I said no one was more surprised than me that I got the shot Janice 😊
    I met with my closest friend for lunch after I had my first shot and told her of my sudden sense that I should get the shot. She said I was the third friend of hers who had told her the exact same thing happening. I don’t know why I should have gotten it but I do know I can trust our Lord with or without that shot…husband got the J and J and I got the Pfizer …
    Right now a dear 90 year old FIL of my friend is in the hospital with Covid….this is his second admittance to the hospital due to Covid. And I know of three others who have been in and out of the hospital in recent days due to Covid related issues. One of those is the husband of a friend and they have now flown in their out of town children to say their goodbyes 😢

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  28. Nightingale’s original plan for tonight’s dinner was to order a pizza for me, and have something different for herself and Boy. Then she remembered that today is her “cheat day” on her eating plan, so she wants to make individual pizzas for us, along with homemade barbecue (or some other kind of sauce) chicken wings. (She is not what most people would consider “fat”, but does have some extra weight she is losing, along with participating in a fitness challenge.)

    Although that sounds delicious, I was disappointed because I knew that it would involve a lot of kitchen clean-up afterwards. You may remember that shortly after Hubby’s death, I had asked Nightingale to let me have Sundays “off” from cleaning up after dinner. But as that has mostly fallen to the wayside, I haven’t pushed it, especially on the Sundays she works (like today), because I know that she is a busy young woman and has enough on her plate to deal with. She will jump in and do it now and then, but I don’t ask.

    She and I were exchanging texts this morning which is when she mentioned this being her cheat day, but she will make the pizzas with much less fat and calories than those that can be bought. So I told her, “I’ll help you burn some calories by letting you help me clean up after dinner. 🙂 ) She gave me a thumb’s up on that. 🙂

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  29. Boy, at ten and a half, is all of a sudden getting more concerned about his appearance. He usually wouldn’t even brush his hair, but now he is using gel to make it stay down and look cool. The other night, he showed his mother and me some outfits that he thought went together well and were “cool”, for our opinion.

    A little while ago, he was getting ready to go out to play with Gabby, and guess what he did? He checked himself out in my full-length mirror before going out. 😀

    My “Little Guy” is growing up! :-O

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  30. Another thing about Boy: He has been participating in a football conditioning camp that meets one or two evenings a week. (There is not a regular schedule, but the coach texts the parents when he is available.) One of the exercises is to put on a harness and pull a sled-type thing carrying a lot of weight a certain distance. Boy has been the only one able to carry the heaviest loads. (The last one was over 100 pounds.) He’s a beast! 😀

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  31. I have been discussing with a few friends about the vaccine and for some it does seem to get down to a trusting God one way or the other, trusting Him to answer the prayer from early on to be kept safe from Covid, and trusting Him to keep one safe from vaccine effects. And a big part of it has to do with what their children want them to do. One friend was totally opposed to it, but then felt a prompting that she should get it and she did. There is still time to decide for myself although it is a bit risky. It’s an old cliche, but so far I am sticking with, ‘If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.’

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  32. My mother has always been an alternative medicine user and slight vaccine skeptic – she had us vaccinated as children but sees no need to get the yearly flu shot herself. But she was completely on board for getting this vaccine, getting me to book it for her. Her elder brother also got it, and his children are the ones who talk wildly about the vaccine being the Mark of the Beast, etc. He told my mother that he prayed for wisdom to know if he should take it and felt that he should. Not sure what his anti-vaccine, anti COVID children thought of his decision, though I have noticed less militancy about the vaccine from a couple of them, though another has recently made really lurid claims about the vaccine that have absolutely no basis in reality. Since he is the one who suggested that those who got the vaccine were apostate, I’m not sure even respect for his father is likely to sway his opinions.

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  33. I was a fairly early adopter of the vaccine, as you all know. I’m in a higher risk category due to age and I work in a field that normally requires at least some public engagement. I also live alone which makes a future of lockdowns less bearable than it is for others with built-in family households.

    But it also seemed to me the wisest and most logical choice to make when weighed against the probability of seeing this situation continue for that much longer — taking lives, longterm health, livelihoods, businesses, and for some, mental health in dealing with lockdowns, along with it. The stress and downsides, I think, have been evident in our culture in a very short time.

    Now that’s no guarantee that another plague will come our way or that some might not have serious reactions to the vaccines. Not everyone medically should take the vaccine, including the very old in some cases.

    God always is in control of all of it, so we can only follow the clues and aids and helps God (I believe) provides along the way and wait and see what the outcome is.

    I generally see modern medicine as a blessing provided by God. The Christian Scientist view is the strangest I’ve come across; I had a co-worker who was raised in that and the thinking behind it (mind over matter, essentially, couched in quasi-religious — not Christian — terms) was certainly not biblical.

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  34. Karen. Growing up doesn’t really have much to do with it.
    He is beginning to notice girls.
    That changes almost everything in a boy’s life.
    Mostly for good.
    Try to keep him on the right path without getting in the way.
    I don’ t know what age we’re talking about, but the change of life can be a difficult period in a man’s life.

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  35. I do not see it as a religious thing at all. Simply a personal preference. Based on what we know or don’t know.

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  36. And mumsee’s living situation is a bit more isolated than that of some (most?) of the rest of us who are iiving in cities, attending fairly large churches, working jobs that require us to venture”outside” our individual realms.

    We continued our way through the first chapter of Revelation today.

    I liked this statement: “From kings to sparrows, Jesus is on the throne of history and we are called to respond appropriately, faithfully.”

    We are always living in God’s active presence, whether in his grace, truth and mercy — or in his wrath and judgement. (Nations included, and he will establish and depose nations, bringing them to account.)

    “The Lord of hosts has purposed it, to defile the pompous pride of all glory, to dishonor all the honored of the earth” (Isa. 23:9)

    “He brings the princes to nothing; He makes the judges of the earth useless” (Isa. 40:23)

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  37. I was talking to some folks after church today who have a daughter living in Australia where Covid is spiking once again. I’ll look up some news sources, but I was curious because she said only a very small percentage of people there have been vaccinated.

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  38. ____________________

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-57325514

    Covid: The Australian millennials desperate for vaccines
    By Frances Mao
    BBC News, Sydney

    Published 4 days ago

    ~ The hot, new thing that young people want in Australia right now? It’s not the latest Yeezy sneakers or an iPhone – it’s a Covid vaccine, preferably the much coveted Pfizer.

    For most millennials it’s off-limits right now, a reality many argue is holding them back – and risking their future.

    Four months into Australia’s vaccine programme, most people aged under 40 still aren’t eligible to get the jab. The country has been running a rollout in stages based on age and vulnerability.
    The process has also been held up by supply issues, delivery failures and concerns over the AstraZeneca vaccine.

    Earlier this week in Sydney, the BBC observed a long queue outside a vaccination hub made up of many people who appeared to be millennials, aged between 25 and 40.

    Some qualified for the jab despite their age because they were a household contact of a frontline worker. They jumped at the chance to be vaccinated. … ~

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  39. Chas – Boy’s concern about his appearance and the fact that Gabby is a girl aren’t related, I don’t think. He has not shown any signs of being interested in her other than to play with outside. He seems to be concerned, in a casual way, about his appearance whenever he goes out, and whatever he is doing. I say “in a casual way” because he isn’t obsessed about looking a certain way, just more aware of trying to look good somewhat.

    But it is possible that those two could start “liking” each other sometime soon.

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  40. Haha! Mr. Concerned-About-His-Looks just came in to go pee, and he is sweaty and his hair is messed up. Now they are going into the woods.

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  41. Harry and Meghan had their second child today – a daughter named Lilibet Diana. Apparently, they will call her Lili. Lilibet was Queen Elizabeth’s childhood nickname.

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  42. The weird stuff about the Covid vaccine puzzles me. I have an acquaintance who used to be an RN (she hasn’t practiced in the 18 years I’ve known her, other than to help out family members or friends who need an “aide” for a few days). She said at our Zoom Bible study a couple of weeks ago that pregnant women should stay away from people who’ve had the shots, because the woman is likely to get sick from the shot and it will kill her baby. She was quite concerned about it. If an RN doesn’t even know this shot doesn’t have the virus in it, and there’s nothing for said pregnant woman to “catch,” I guess I’m less surprised that the general public can be quite stupid in their reactions to it.

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  43. Canada had the vaccine supply issue and that held us back for a while. People are jumping at the chance to get vaccinated now. My parents are hopeful they will be able to book second vaccine appointments that are sooner than their current ones now that supplies have increased. Second also would like one sooner, as she is pregnant and would like to be fully vaccinated as soon as possible.
    My mother was talking to Eldest and was surprised to find Eldest had not heard of the growing prevalence of the B.1.617 variant, from India, which is more infectious and virulent than the Kent variant which is the current dominant strain in Europe and North America. The B.1.617 variant has become dominant in the hardest hit region of Ontario.

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  44. Cheryl, we’ve heard that claim too. It is downright silly. By the way, not practicing for just 3 years as an RN in Ontario strips you of the right to call yourself a nurse unless you went through a re-licensing process or had been working as a nurse in another jurisdiction. One is never a nurse for life.

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  45. Roscuro – I have seen people sharing articles that claim that pregnant women are having miscarriages after getting the vaccine. Is there any truth to that, that you know of?

    *******

    When I got my first shot, they went ahead and scheduled me for the second shot. I don’t know if all the vaccine venues around here did that, but it makes sense. It was hard enough getting the first appointment, so I was glad I didn’t have to wonder when I could get a second one.

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  46. I am still not comfortable with getting the vaccine, though it was offered to me twice here. I agree that God could change my mind and am happy not to have anyone pushing me. Now I need dental work in a town three hours away, that is alittle concerning.

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  47. I did something yesterday that I haven’t done before. We decided to have a family zoom and after I got on one daughter told me that a comment I made on the family thread should not have been made. She did not drop it, so I just said that I did not get on here to be yelled at, goodbye and hung up. Three granddaughters were also there listening. She later sent me a message sort of apologizing. I thanked here and said I thought what she said was rude and disrespectful. I do not want to feel attacked when I am with her. I have restrained my self from saying things to her and it was time.

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  48. Kizzie, no. In the general population, some pregnant women do miscarry, and so, when tens of thousands of pregnant women get vaccinated, some will end up miscarrying because among tens of thousands of pregnant women, statistically, some will miscarry. The concern would only be if more miscarriages occured proportionally in vaccinated women than in unvaccinated women, and there is nothing to indicate that. But those who push that narrative of vaccines causing miscarriages are being rather cruel. Second, as you know, miscarried last November, and is pregnant again. COVID is very dangerous for pregnant women, and the data from the US on pregnant women getting vaccinated showed it was generally safe. So, Second chose to get her first vaccine as a precaution. The baby and she were both fine afterward. But when her husband mentioned to a friend that she had been vaccinated, the friend’s immediate response was that pregnant women were miscarrying due to the vaccine. Second now feels that if anything goes wrong in this pregnancy, she will be criticized for causing it by being vaccinated.

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  49. Eldest, by the way, and her husband are both fully vaccinated now. Their three eldest children are in their teens, and now that the mRNA vaccines have been approved for teens, they are getting vaccinated. My two eldest nephews have already had their first dose. Eldest is, like my mother, a partial vaccine skeptic – she had all her children’s vaccinations delayed for a few months as she was concerned they were too young (in that I would disagree, because my studies taught me that infants actually have a far greater capacity to mount an immune response than adults do) – but sees the benefit of this one. I think they hope it will allow them to cross the border to see us. The Youngest’s, on the other hand, are firmly anti-vaxxers and have made it a religious issue not to get this vaccine. The mother in-law of Youngest has been sending us links again.

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  50. Kizzie, in further information on your question about the vaccine and pregnancy, the rate of pregnancy ending in miscarriage in the general population is estimated between 1 in 4 to 1 in 5 in Western countries. That means before COVID, one in every four to five pregnancies ended in miscarriage. My mother had five pregnancies, and one ended in miscarriage. She raised her daughters with the knowledge that miscarriage was likely to be a part of motherhood, and all of my siblings have experienced at least one miscarriage. So, with those high rates of pregnancy loss already in existence in the general population, there will be a number of vaccinated pregnant women who do miscarry. As this Reuters article notes, those who blame miscarriage on vaccination can be very judgemental and completely fail to understand that miscarriage is always a risk of pregnancy: https://www.reuters.com/article/factcheck-miscarriage-vaccine-idUSL1N2LT21A

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  51. Thanks, Roscuro. I figured that that was probably merely anti-vaccination propaganda.

    Almost had to laugh when a friend shared a post on Facebook that claimed that those who have not been vaccinated still have to wear masks to protect those who have been vaccinated, ending with “Are you awake yet?”

    She and her friends tend to be against vaccination, and some, including my friend, can be pretty harsh in their comments, so I hesitated a bit, but then went ahead and commented that the masks are to protect those who haven’t been vaccinated yet, not those who have been. No one replied to that, but one person “liked” it at least.

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  52. If someone has natural immunity to Covid, as some people appear to have, do they need to get vaccinated? It seems the vaccine has side effects, some which may be unknown, so it might be prudent for those such as a spouse who did not get it from their spouse who had a terrible case of it to not get the vaccine. I know one situation like that.

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  53. I have had a bit of pressure from my friend, Karen, to get the vaccine. She thinks some people don’t get it because of politics. I had not even considered that until she mentioned it.

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  54. Janice, it depends, as a good percentage of those with long COVID have noticed a reduction in their symptoms after having the vaccine. Viruses can linger in isolated areas of the body and cause lingering symptoms after active illness has ceased, and it may be that those who suffer from long COVID and are helped to clear those lingering viral pockets by having the vaccine.

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  55. I am usually slow and way behind the rush to do anything, so it is the same with the vaccine. I know it’s a totally different arena, but for example, we see movies after everyone else saw them three to ten years ago.

    I am glad that all who feel the need to get vaccinated have been able to do so.

    I have heard that Georgia is lagging behind in people getting vaccinated. Art was able to walk in and get his second vaccine without an appointment, so it’s not like the supplies are limited.

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  56. Roscuro, yeah, I know that a person who hasn’t practiced nursing in many years can’t still call herself a nurse. But one would think she would have enough medical knowledge to know how vaccines work, and that you can’t pass on a disease from a vaccine that isn’t even a virus, let a lone a live virus. If those with some medical training don’t understand those distinctions, what chance does the average person have?

    Another of my friends told me that according to some vaccination-tracking database, 400 people a day are dying of the vaccine in America. Sorry, but that sounds highly improbable. I do think there is some risk to the vaccine, as to any medical treatment (my father likely died of kidney failure caused by a flu shot). But people are forgetting that in this case the virus comes with really bad side effects. This isn’t a vaccine against a mild cold. It’s a vaccine against a disease that kills many, causes really bad symptoms in many, and causes ongoing issues in many. People need at least to consider the bad aspects of the virus and weigh it against the vaccine. (I haven’t yet been vaccinated because I have been in strict isolation for more than 15 months. Since we are looking to phase out of that isolation a bit, I am also looking to get the vaccine soon. My husband recommended I wait till I finish this huge project, in case I experience side effects, and that may be wise. But I am looking at getting it in the next four or five weeks.)

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  57. I received the vaccines in March and was given the 2nd appointment after getting the first shot.

    I think CA now has a little over 50% vaccinated — combined with those who have had the virus and survived, that would combine to boost general population immunity higher.

    But yes, I’d seen the info that roscuro posted also, that the vaccines appear to be helping to ease the long term effects. One of the scarier aspects of this disease is how it ruins the lungs and causes other after-effects in a person’s overall health that are quite serious.

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  58. Cheryl, in one of the links Youngest’s mother-in-law has sent, someone claiming to be a doctor said that the vaccine was injected into the bloodstream. That was a howler. The difference between intravenous (into the veins) and intramuscular injection routes is something healthcare trainees learn very early on, and the vaccines are intramuscular.

    As for the vaccine tracking database, I’ve heard and investigated that one too. The database is known as VAERs (vaccine adverse event reports) and anyone, not just a medical professional, can submit a report on it. The reports are then investigated, and the VAERs that reported deaths post-vaccine are investigated and so far, no link has been found. Like miscarriages, deaths happen everyday in the general population, so when people are vaccinated in the millions, there will be deaths that occur in the vaccinated population from unrelated causes at comparable rates to the general population. In 2019, i.e. pre COVID, the daily death rate in the US from all causes was 8000. So, when tens of thousands of people are vaccinated in a given day, the chances are that some of them will die from unrelated causes shortly after. Second actually read some of the VAERs and said it was clear that the people were already very unwell before getting the vaccine. Yes, a very small number of people may die from unusual reactions to the vaccine, as any medical treatment can cause a rare death (there was a risk I could have died from surgery or from the anesthetic), but once again, the risk is extremely low.

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  59. I should mention that the number you heard Cheryl, was exaggerated. The last I read is was 4000 deaths total reported on VAERs after the vaccine, and as I said, they had been investigated and no link found.

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  60. i had a fever of 101 and had terrbly aching legs for a couple of days, tiredness, headache. Never vomited, however. Sore arm, but that is not unusual for flu shots. The Shingles shot really made my arm sore.

    Liked by 1 person

  61. Busy weekend over, GS1 scored the first run and his team won the baseball game. GD2 did well in her dance recital. She was a bumble bee in a group dance. GD1’s soccer team lost both it’s games.

    Sadly, D2 refused to see us since we have not been vaccinated. She’s as stubborn in that respect as the antivaxers are. My thought is 1- if the vaccine works, what difference does it make; and 2- if masks and distancing were OK before the vaccine, why wouldn’t that work now?

    I feel the enemy of our souls is using this to divide families and churches. Pray for our relationship.

    Liked by 2 people

  62. so my mouse has not been working. I finally gave up and ordered a new wireless mouse from Australia. Today the principal loaned me a wireless mouse. It is not working either. I tried moving it to another port. No luck. I almost did my self in by unclicking where it said to leave the touchpad working when a mouse is connected. Had to disconnect the mouse to get my sensor back. What could it be???

    Liked by 1 person

  63. Time to give up and go to bed for Jo.
    It’s morning for the rest of us.

    I can’t see well enough t carry on much conversation now
    Have a nice day, everyone.

    Like

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