Our Daily Thread 1-20-20

Good Morning!

Today is MLK Jr. Day.

The U.S. Navy is set to announce today that a future aircraft carrier will be the first named in honor of an African American.

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The header is from Kare.

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Anyone have a QoD?

 

 

54 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 1-20-20

  1. I thought yesterday was the 20th!? Well, that makes today my grandfather’s birthday. I miss him every day. He’s been gone 22 years.

    The sunrise was beautiful this morning. I was up trying to get some studying in while everyone else was still asleep.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Cold? It’s 11° here with a light snow, more like flurries.

    I found some old Arizona Highways magazines yesterday when going through a box from the flooded closet. I miss the warm winters.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Morning! It is 24 degrees and the sun is shining. Our high is predicted to reach 48….we need snow!
    Today my parents would have been married 70 years. Dad has been gone 8 years and it seems just like yesterday that we said our so longs. Time takes on a whole new meaning the older I get…
    This past Saturday one of my dearest foster babies got married. She is 28 and was the loveliest bride. She is in New York City so I didn’t attend the festivities but I did get to see photos 😊

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I’m praying for daughter.
    “Time takes on a new meaning the older I get.”
    A great truth. Time is all I have now. Lots of it.
    But I still find myself trying to be efficient. Like doing something while waiting for something else. When time means nothing now. Just waiting.
    (Don’t ask “for what”)

    Liked by 3 people

  5. It may be a holiday but it’s a regular working Monday for us. As our pastor said recently, we were made to work.

    Yes, time is a strange thing. This month (on the 25th), my mom will have been gone for 40 years. In March, my dad will have been gone for 50 years. I think I lost them both much too soon; and yet it was God’s timing.

    For the first time I put “2019” on a check (to my gardener who comes today unless he’s taking off for the holiday to be with his family, he has young kids). Argh. I was so proud of myself when I wrote “2020” on the church check yesterday morning without even having to stop and think.

    It’s cloudy and cool here today, but not 25 degrees; we may get some sprinkles, but that’s about it.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I have spent the last few days deleting 30 g of pictures and videos from my computer. It was down to only 50 mb free. Then I turned it off last night. Now it is taking a long time to start

    Liked by 3 people

  7. I did not realize it is a holiday, we started school. Husband is getting his infusion. Life goes on. But eighteen’s worker has not shown up yet. Maybe she is not coming. That would be dreadful. But doable.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Speaking of God’s timing, I was thinking the other day abut a near disaster that worked out.

    When I was six, I had a ruptured appendix. I still remember crying while they rushed me from Winnsboro, SC to Baptist Hospital in Columbia. (about 30 mi.) It was three days in coma and, I can remember my dad telling it. “The doctor came in grinning from ear to ear.” Why? He’s crying. ‘That’s because he’s hungry”
    I was out of school a lot my first year and I had to repeat the first grade.

    But, after I retired, I was reflecting on that, as I do many things lately, and occurred and I considered this.
    If I hadn’t gotten sick, I would have gotten out of school two years earlier. S.C. at the time, had eleven years of schooling. They added a year and my class was the first 12 year schedule.
    If I hadn’t failed the first grade, I would have actually gotten out of school two years earlier.
    I wasn’t ready to face the world at that age.

    Liked by 5 people

  9. Coffee.

    The building where we have our work space is “open” 24/7 — meaning that the lobby is open and those of us with key cards can access the robotic-voice elevators (“going up”) to get to our work cubbies. But that doesn’t always mean you’ll have A/C or heating. Today all of that will be shut down for the holiday so I’m guessing all of us are working from home or other places today. I certainly don’t miss rushing about for the forced morning commutes.

    Coffee.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Yeah, Chas, I don’t know that you’ve mentioned that (at least not often, I don’t recall it either).

    Those events make one ponder anew God’s ways.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Her worker arrived. Relief. You have to understand that when she is not here, daughter stands in the dining room, next to the living room (where I am) and chatters non stop at me or toward me. Nothing nice This while others are doing school work. Because she is currently mad at her worker (remember she kicked the worker the other day), she retreats to her room while the worker is here. So the worker is paid to read books, play on her phone, watch movies, etc, while being a wall to keep daughter from constantly interrupting daily life on this side. When daughter is doing that, we are extra watchful of baby. So, when daughter was leaving for her interview, one of the concerns was when would the worker arrive. But it is all good now.

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Tomorrow, husband has a meeting with the person in charge of an assisted living facility in Boise. Yesterday, I read about a guy who confessed to raping two nonverbal women in an assisted living facility in Boise, several years ago. It is a risky thing, but so is her walking up and down the highway where the ex prisoners are released.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. I heard a spot of weather news this a.m. that said it feels like 15° with wind chill. My knees are feeling it. But I did get out yesterday and clear an area in the carport to help the workers. That may have upset my knees. I had a call from a worker who said additional material is ordered and may arrive late today so work is planned for tomorrow. And so it runs into my jury duty day. Not what I wanted, but it is what it is unless I call in this evening and they say they have enough without me. That has never happened, but with so many sick with the flu, maybe that ups the chance. Not that I want anyone go be suffering with the flu.

    And now to try and find a sale on copy/printer paper for the office. I’ve bought most of the new season supplies but Art told me to wait and try to find a better deal on the paper. As you can imagine that is always a major expense each tax season.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I have an aunt, my father’s baby sister, who just turned 100. My brother went to see her, but she did not seem to know who he was. He had asked me to go, but I was needing to be home. This is the longest living relative I have known of.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. And it’s the Navy, not Trump that selected him for the honor.

    “This will be the second ship named in honor of Miller for his actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.”

    —-

    “The USS Miller, a frigate, was also named in honor of Miller. Miller also received a Purple Heart Medal, the American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal. Miller died in action in 1943 after a torpedo hit the ship he was aboard in the Gilbert Islands.

    “Doris Miller stood for everything that is good about our nation, and his story deserves to be remembered and repeated wherever our people continue the watch today,” Modly said in a statement.”

    Liked by 2 people

  16. My only living uncle just turned 90–and out of nine who made it to adulthood in my parents’ families, one made it to 80, and now one to 90. Two made it within two or three months of 80, and my mom made it to a year and a half from 80, but only two actually made it there, and one of those reached 90. (Quite unexpectedly. Medically there are at least three reasons he “should have” died quite some time ago.) It’s a blessing to still have him, and I was able to talk to him for a few minutes.

    DJ, as an only child, I think that losing your parents fairly early in life is particularly sobering. I lost both before I was 40 (16 and 36), and I was still single for several more years, but with lots of siblings. I’m still amazed when I meet someone who is 50 and still has both parents, even though I’ve known people past 70 who still did. When I met my husband, he was 50 and he’d lost his first wife, but he still had both parents and both parents-in-law; I was younger and had lost both my parents and my stepdad.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. My grandparents, mostly, made it to their 80s(?) — I’m always amazed when younger colleagues talk about their grandparents. My last one died when I was still in college and my dad died just as I was starting college.

    Like

  18. Typical frustrations trying to work on what is a holiday for everyone else. No government or private company folks to be found anywhere for a story I’m trying to do for tomorrow.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Janice, be in awe that God is using such useless, boring people for His purposes. He has equipped for what He wants done. And pray that He continues to bring wisdom and patience and love.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. I think it’s appropriate to name a carrier the USS Doris Miller. But people who don’t know will think “Doris” is female. I heard the word but didn’t believe what I heard.

    Mumsee. Lots of things I haven’t mentioned. I had no reason to tell that I my stomach is scarred with a knife cut and three tube inserts. It is covered by a bathing suit and neither I nor anyone else thinks about it.

    Like

  21. I know I was about to die that day. I suspect what happened that an angel reminded God that he has plans for Caden Muller, Charlie Harris, or one of the other grandkids, and If I die, they won’t happen.

    LOL
    I Know, not really funny. But I said that to emphasize that I know that is one of two miracles that allow me to be here today.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. DJ, the last of my grandparents died ten years before I was born. I had rarely even seen photos–in fact, once I got the family photos after Mom died, I had to figure out which of the photos were of my grandparents, and I initially guessed wrong for my maternal grandparents. I think I may have seen family photos once in my life, and not enough to know who anyone was. I suspect it was too painful for Mom. Her dad died when she was a teenager, her mom when she was across the world (in Nigeria) in her twenties. She just didn’t talk about them much, and definitely she didn’t sit down with photo albums and reminisce. The photos were in trunks that weren’t opened. Even the Christmas that I was in college, that she told my sister and me that she’d open the trunks when we visited her for Christmas, when it came time to do so, she couldn’t / wouldn’t, but made excuses.

    I know looking back that I had classmates in grade school tell me that a grandparent had died, and I probably came across as completely uncompassionate. Thing is, I had nothing at all to draw on in terms of knowing what that relationship was, except the mere technical detail. I didn’t know aunts and uncles and cousins, and grandparents were completely theoretical. I don’t think it really even occurred to me that a lot of kids actually knew their grandparents. My experience with aunts and uncles and cousins were that they lived a long way away and you didn’t even know what they looked like. Grandparents were even less “real.” I could understand the sorrow of losing a pet, even a fish or a hamster, but grandparents were just that abstract to me. I think I was a teenager before I realized that to some kids a grandparent was really important. Up till that time, they’d been kind of like Santa Claus.

    My girls knew their grandparents well, and hopefully that will translate well to good relations for their own children.

    Like

  23. I never knew my maternal grandmother, she became ill, some kind of cancer, and died when I was very little and we were living in Hollywood — my mom had been taking care of her in our apartment in those final weeks, she’s buried in North Hollywood. I think that’s when, prompted by my questioning, my mom first laid it on me that we will all, her included, die. What!? This was not good news in my little world.

    My maternal grandfather, Grandpa Charlie, and paternal Grandmother, Grandma Dena, were regular visitors during the winter months — and we’d stay with them in Iowa when we traveled back to the family homeland. Most of the uncles, cousins, etc., were in one of two places, LA (after having migrated from Iowa or Minnesota) or northwest Iowa, so I knew them all growing up.

    I have my grandfather’s old hand-carved wooden “hook” cane, it leans up against my fireplace (this Christmas I tied a red-and-black piece of buffalo checked fabric ribbon on it, sitting there it always reminds me of the final scene in Miracle on 34th Street). If I am remembering the story right, he’d met Geronimo at some point, he was a nursery man, a large, gentle guy who was very quiet and reserved. He also gave me my first Bible, a white zip-around children’s edition. His name is signed on the title page. He died when I was 12 and I was always sorry I didn’t know him better (I was very shy then; my mom kept trying to get us to bond, but it was difficult through the shyness, I think).

    Grandma Dena, my dad’s mom who raised 3 boys on an Iowa farm, was a bit more chilly and my mom would always fret when she came to visit. Out came the heavy-duty furniture polish and rags. She apparently was quite the housekeeping critic.

    Liked by 3 people

  24. I’m exhausted. Four grandkids for the entire day. We went to the church playground. Then found a door open so we could explore the church. The 3 year old and the 1 year old will be coming to BSF with me. Pray that it goes well. They have never been in any sort of class before.
    We saw their classrooms and they liked them. Then we came home and had pizza. We also looked at the junior high and high school classrooms which the older two would be in if they decided to come.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. After lunch we went for a hike in the woods. Pushed the stroller up and down hills. After we returned their mom came home from work. She was so tired I sent her into a bedroom to lock the door and get some rest while we kept playing.
    Did I say that I am tired???
    Tomorrow I speak at the women’s Bible study.

    Liked by 5 people

  26. I remember Grandma Dena had this old-fashioned wringer thing in her Iowa basement. Except I don’t have a basement. A washboard and a tub in the backyard would at least bypass any and all plumbing. Plumbing and I don’t seem to get along at all.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. My paternal grandparents died before I was born, and my maternal grandmother died when I was four. Although I don’t have any specific memories of her, I do remember loving her and being loved in return. My maternal grandfather died when I was 14, so although we did not live in the same state, I had enough visits with him to have somewhat of a relationship with him. We also exchanged letters from time to time.

    On holidays, it was only my parents, my older brother, and me. I longed for a larger family. Raising my daughters with involved grandparents who lived nearby was such a blessing to me, as well as to them.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. DJ – What you wrote about your mom’s cleaning before Grandma Dena came to visit reminded me of something a lady in my previous church had said. Her MIL was a perfectionist about cleaning, while Joy was not. The MIL would actually comment on some things not being cleaned or dusted to her standards.

    One day, after years of being bothered by this, Joy told her MIL that she (Joy) makes MIL’s son happy, and that is all that should matter to her. The MIL never said another word about Joy’s housecleaning. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Kizzie, I didn’t have grandparents and didn’t know my aunts and uncles . . . but I had older brothers who came home for family holidays, and that always made those days special. I say now that my adult brothers were a bit like young uncles when I was growing up. I don’t remember when they lived at home (just the youngest of them and a foggy sense of the others being in and out and maybe going on vacation with us); the first of them joined the army when he was 17 (and I was barely three) and the second of them went to college the year I entered kindergarten, so most of my childhood memories of all of them except the fourth were of them coming by for visits and those family holidays.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. I remember my mother in law coming to help when second son was arriving. I had no idea why she was there and did not know what to do. And I am not a house keeper. Anyway, I came into the room one day and she was standing on the end of the couch dusting a light bulb. I knew from an earlier conversation when they complained to husband about soap scum where the bar of soap was in the bathroom, that I was not a housekeeper. Years later, when she came to Germany to visit us, I told her I was much more comfortable with who I am and she was welcome to clean anything she wanted. Sadly, she declared she was no longer concerned with housekeeping and we went for lots of walks with the children instead. It helps to grow up and not take offense when none is intended. Or even if it is.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Mumsee, when I was single I used to have a friend who was much more concerned about housekeeping perfection than I was. In those days (single days), I’d do what I could to prepare for company, and if anything was left over, I’d throw it in my bedroom and shut the door.

    Only this particular friend would open the door (without asking) and laugh about how messy my bedroom was. It embarrassed me, and somehow I never paused to consider that I was being a much better hostess than she was, a guest. If I’d invited her to look into my bedroom, she would have been laughing with me at how I conducted the finishing touches. As it was, she was laughing at me and not with me, and going places she had not been invited to go. I did choose not to take offense, but it probably would have been better to tell her that she was out of line, because good manners are a useful skill. Sometimes it’s best to say, “I’m not really offended, but you need to know that I shut my bedroom door on purpose, and I want it to stay shut.” Or I suppose it would also work to lean something large and clanky against the door . . .

    Liked by 1 person

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