42 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 1-17-19

  1. I already said “good morning once”.
    I was helping Elvera get out of her “Always” panties that she wears during the night.
    Because they were wet.
    So? I said “step out”.
    remanded me that many years ago, my sister called her panties “step in’s”.
    Do any of you remember that?
    In those days, women wore dresses all the time and those were the only thing they “stepped in” to.
    Though I’ve never heard anyone else say, “step ins”. But no reason to.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I just saw on TV that the Range Rover can climb a 48 degree incline.
    I need to get one of those.

    Seriously:
    I had to buy a new battery yesterday. I doubt I really had to. All I needed was a boost but my old battery was 5 years old and the guy was a good salesman.
    But he told me something that I had not considered, and it seems logical to me.
    My Mercury has not been up to highway speeds in over a year now.
    He said that the alternator does not do a good job at the lower speeds. It needs to run at high speed occasionally.
    But it is a problem. Running two miles at 35 mph all year doesn’t do it.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Morning! It is dark as pitch outside right now. Must be overcast because I don’t see any moonlight nor stars out there!
    Chas you should get Chuck to take that car out on the highway ever so often and “blow out the dust”…that is what my Dad would always say 😊
    “Step in” makes sense as that is what we Mom’s would tell our kiddos when dressing them after their baths…oh those were the days…I kind of miss them…but then again…maybe not 🙃

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Good morning!
    I have heard undies called step ins probably when I was a child. My parents were older when they had me so I heard some of the older expressions. I also have probably seen the expression in historical fiction.

    The tax office is getting lively again. We can’t file online until the 28th, but those who have their things together can go ahead and have an appointment to get ahead of the rush of what will be a crazy crunch year.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Those birds (yellow-shafted northern flickers) are looking at each other. Both are males, and apparently one is a trespasser, or the other thinks he is, or they were just establishing territories and both trying to claim this area. Funny thing is it was taken in fall, maybe October (fall color was really late this year) and they wouldn’t have been nesting. Some birds choose mates in fall, stay with them all winter and already “know” them by spring; other birds stay on their territories year-round. But one still doesn’t associate territorial displays with fall!

    I was on the walking trail, which has a bit of paving off to the side in one direction leading to the next street over and connecting that street to the trail for the benefit of those who live on that street. A woman got chatting with me and asking me what I was photographing (cedar waxwings) and she told me about the pair of red-shouldered hawks that nest locally, and we compared bird notes. And then she continued on and walked onto this connecting trail to go home, but she quickly came back to the path and over to me and told me about flickers doing “some sort of mating dance, I think.” So I went with her, and sure enough these boys were having at it. I was able to tell her what was going on, having seen it once before and then researched it. I had two flickers in my backyard facing each other; periodically one of them would bob its head up and down and dance, and then the other would. I assumed it was courtship, and I took several photos and even a short video or two. But when I pulled it up onto my computer, I was surprised to realize both were females. (The males have the “mustaches” seen in this photo, and the females don’t. In the red-shafted northern flicker, the mustache is red, and the birds are also red under the tails and wings, where yellow-shafted are yellow.) When I googled the behavior, I found that when a flicker trespasses onto the territory of another flicker, the bird of its own sex confronts it and dances, and usually one bird leaves, but occasionally they fight. In most birds, the trespasser is more likely to be the one to retreat (unless the resident bird is young or weak), and that’s probably the case with flickers, too. At any rate, that is what is happening, and we watched the males for several minutes until a couple on bicycles rode down there and the birds flew.

    If you look at the toes of the bird in the rear (right), you can see that he is moving.

    Interesting sidenote: If you research the breeding habits of various animal species, you will often discover they are physically capable of mating quite early in life, but the presence of older members of that species keeps them from doing so. A one-year-old red-winged blackbird male, for instance, isn’t yet glossy black (he’s black, but not sharp black and not glossy) and he may not have fully developed epaulets (the red and yellow patches on his shoulders). He may choose a territory and try to defend it, but a fully adult male will probably drive him off it, especially if he chooses a good spot. If he ends up with a territory at all, it won’t be a good one, and females probably won’t choose his territory and thus choose him. If he does somehow manage to get a mate, she’s likely young and inexperienced, too, and they are unlikely to be successful in bringing a nest of young to maturity–they simply don’t know enough yet to nest in a good spot (concealed from predators and safe from other dangers such as flooding, near to good food sources) and to be good at nest defense and feeding the young. Likewise, year-old white-tailed deer bucks can successfully mate, but they are nowhere near as large and powerful as they will be as full adults, and the only way a yearling buck is going to get a chance to mate is if there are no bigger bucks around (as in a deer farm) . . . or when big bucks are fighting each other and he sneaks in and mates with the female–but he may well get gored by one of the big guys if he does that and they see him! Bald eagles and elephants and elephant seals are several other species that are physically capable of reproduction for several years before they are likely to have a mate. If illness or hunting wipes out a good percentage of the species, they have a “back-up” of younger animals that are eager to breed–but not necessarily with good results. Areas in Africa that have killed off mature African elephants have found that the young males that are less mature are also more destructive when there aren’t older males around to keep them in line. In many species, females breed younger than males for the first time, largely for that reason, though they may or may not have breeding success on the first attempt when they are young and inexperienced at caring for young.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Never heard the term ‘step ins’, but it makes sense.

    I have heard the excuse about the alternator for some people’s speeding. 😀

    Like

  7. Mr. Energy would tell you five years is a good time to replace a battery, so I think you made a good call, Chas. But having your son take the car for a drive now and then, just to blow out the carbon and make sure all is running well, is a good idea, too.

    Weird weather. Mr. Energy/Fit was out running during the pause (in which I escaped to Zumba). I beat him home and was reading the newspaper when I heard a roar to the north.

    It sounded maybe like rain, but maybe it was the heater coming on?

    I looked south, out the slider, nothing happening out there.

    But the roar built. I got up, opened the front door and monsoon!

    In the time it took me to walk two rooms south, it started raining in the back yard.

    Which reminded me of Hawai’i where it would be raining on one block, we’d go around the corner and no rain.

    Or, it would rain out of clear skies which never made any sense.

    Anyway, it poured so long, I got concerned and went looking for my jogger–not knowing which direction he went.

    Sure enough, by the time I got home, he was in the shower.

    You just can’t win . . .

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Never heard of step in’s. Have heard of running at highway speeds to clean out the carburator. Never heard of going out to rescue a runner from the rain.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Driving home from work last night it was coming down pretty good — but I turned a corner toward home and suddenly — no rain.

    But it is raining again this morning, started several hours ago before dawn, and now I have to get ready to go to the teachers’ rally on one of our main streets (but not far away).

    I found another pair of boots under the bed I think I’ll wear today, the ones I’ve been wearing for 3 days were feeling uncomfortable after that long. They’re not cushioned, kind of the cowgirl style boots but waterproof, and because they have a small stacked heel I think any serious walking was starting to grate on my feet by Day 3.

    These other boots (all my boots are several years old, just haven’t had an opportunity to wear them for a few years in this drought) are Keens snow/rain boots and have nice, heavy flat lug soles on them. They’re also lined with faux sheepskin and are a bit shorter than the other ones so maybe that’ll make them a more natural choice for all the walking I suspect I’ll have to do out there today.

    Chas, we have televised police car chases here in California, they’ve become one of the most-watched events on local stations. TV news cameras will follow them for hours, sometimes hitting speeds close to 100 mph, across all the freeways (we start to moan if they’re coming “our” way and could wind up something we actually have to cover). Rush hour usually slows them down, but these criminals often just find ways to zoom up onto the shoulder of the roadways and get past it all.

    But new tires are needed once the spike strips are laid out to stop the bad guy.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. I bought my 1995 Corolla in 1999; it had a bit of corrosion around the battery but it worked OK. To be on the safe side, in a couple of years I had the mechanics test it, and they said it was great. I think I did it again a couple of years later. Finally when I had owned the car at least five years (I moved to Nashville in ’03), I thought this battery really must be at the end of its life, and so I had the mechanics test it and probably replace it, and they told me yeah, it was time. Assuming it was original to the car–as seems likely–I got a really good life from that one.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Well, even if it wasn’t original, but two or three years old, that was a good battery.

    I also had light bulbs in my Nashville bathroom–standard old-fashioned ones–that I put in when I moved in (I bought a new light fixture) in a room I used multiple times a day, and only in my last year did they burn out one by one. So they all lasted six and a half to seven years. One never really knows how long something will last, though with elements involving safety (like car batteries), better safe than sorry. (Saying that as someone who was locked out of my car just yesterday because of a dead key battery.)

    Like

  12. I got a new battery last year but when they said I needed one I was surprised. “But I *just* got one.” Then I realized it had been a number of years ago …

    Like

  13. What? Key “batteries” die? I’ve been using mine for 10 years. But I do have a spare … Still, it’s hanging on a hook in the kitchen which would do me little good.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I found this:

    https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/how-long-does-a-key-fob-battery-last
    ________________________

    … A key fob battery will usually last around three to four years before it will need to be replaced. Not having a fully functional key fob can lead to a lot of frustration and stress. In some cases, it will be impossible for a person to get into their car without a working key fob. When the time comes to get a new battery, you will have to take some time to research exactly what you need. By getting an idea of what is needed, you will be able to find the right battery in no time at all.

    Usually, getting the battery out of a key fob can pose a bit of a problem for an inexperienced car owner. Some key fobs will snap apart, while others will have a screw that will need to be taken out. Attempting to do this on your own may cause you to damage the key fob, which will cost you even more money to fix. Many of the key fobs out there are quite expensive due to how high tech they are.

    When your key fob battery is bad, here are some of the things that you will start to notice when your key fob battery is going bad:

    *The car will not unlock
    *It is taking a lot more effort to get the key fob to work
    *The buttons on the key fob will only work on occasion

    By noticing the signs that your key fob is giving you, it will be easy to replace the battery and restore its functionality. Make sure that a high-quality replacement battery is replaced correctly or just have an experienced mechanic inspect and replace the key fob battery for you. …
    __________________________________

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s raining here again.

    Those header birds look cuter on my tablet. The phone screen did not reveal as much personality. We had a chance to see two sea gulls at the beach in a squawking fight. I had never seen or heard that much commotion from gulls and really wondered what prompted that argument.

    Like

  16. Twice now we have found our new to us car with the windows down all the way and the moon roof opened. Our new employee looked that up yesterday and found that you can make that happen using the key fob. I suppose it is for occasions when the car is parked in the hot sun and the driver wants to let some of the heat out of the car before getting in. It is disturbing to think that we might do that by accident when it is raining outside. At least it was not raining yesterday when a preparer who was leleavinthe office called to ask about our car. The other time it happened in our carport after Wesley had been driving the car.

    Like

  17. Today is the 25th anniversary of the Northridge (CA) earthquake.

    Shortly before 4:30 am on 1/17/94 I woke up to hear 14-month-old KJ fussing. It was Mrs. B’s turn to get up with her, but for some reason I got up instead. I picked her up and took her out to the recliner chair in our apartment’s living room. Moments later everything started shaking and rumbling. Power went out so I couldn’t see what was happening but I could hear things falling and shattering. I think it lasted about half a minute but it seemed a few minutes.

    After it was over Mrs B picked her way in the dark though the stuff that had been dumped on the floor to join me in the living room. After we got done exchanging “Are you all right?”s and “I’m okay”s, the next thing she said was, “I don’t want to live here any more”. We had been talking about moving to Michigan some day, but the earthquake gave us a kick to start planning the move, which happened a year and a half later.

    A tall 6-drawer chest facing my side of the bed tipped over onto the bed, dumping drawers out. It was cheap assemble-yourself particle board furniture, so not too heavy, but had I still been there I would have at least been bruised and scratched. KJ still loves hearing the story about how her well-timed fussiness saved me from injury.

    We were in Woodland Hills then, just a few miles from Northridge. The quake was named for Northridge because the worst damage was there, but it actually originated deep beneath the Reseda neighborhood where I grew up. When I saw the spot marked on a map in the LA Times I thought, “That’s exactly where we rode our bikes around a big vacant lot.”

    The quake measured 6.7 on the Richter scale, killed 57 people, and caused $40 billion in damage.

    (Michelle and DJ, notice that last comma? 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

  18. Apparently you aren’t supposed to have your key fob and your cell phone near each other (such as together in the nightstand or the purse or your pocket), since they can interfere with each other and speed the key battery’s demise (and for all I know also increase the frequency at which you need to charge your cell phone). Anyway, I was out for lunch with a friend, and when I tried to leave, I couldn’t get into the car. A month ago it gave us a “key battery low” message on the car screen, but it did that once before (last time we replaced it) and that time there was a second notice a few weeks later; we bought the new batteries with the first warning, replaced them with the second.

    This time there was no second warning.

    My friend saw that I couldn’t get into my car, so she drove over, and I called my husband from her car. (Which was nice partly because if I wasn’t sitting in her car I didn’t have anywhere to put my purse and camera while I called–a Prius is rounded and slopy, and we’d had rain and the car and the ground were damp.) My husband is a research king, and so he told me to hang on and he’d call me back. He knew there was a way to get into the car and drive it if the battery was quite low, and he researched it and called me back and told me. Then after I got home, he changed the batteries.

    Those of you with key fobs might want to check to see if your car has a back-up method, in case you are ever in a parking lot in the rain unable to get into your car. It’s good to know in advance. My husband knew there was a way, but having had the car close to ten years and never using it, he didn’t remember what it was.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I remember that earthquake well, My friend and her family live in Panorama City and everything came crashing down as they raced for the kids’ room, stepping on broken glass in the dark. They were without power for several days, as I recall.

    I spent the morning interviewing shop owners where stuff had just flown off the shelves and dumped all kinds of things (I remember one local liquor store where bottles all shattered on the floor). It wasn’t as strong where we were, probably 50 miles south of the epicenter, but it was strong enough to get most of us up out of bed very quickly with much alarm.

    Just saw an alert of more evacuations in the Hollywood hills, huge areas of mud are on the move under homes there.

    I was drenched covering the rally, took several videos that I tweeted out, interviewed a couple teachers and after about an hour as it was winding down I skedaddled. The rain wasn’t quite “driving” but it was strong and steady.

    I thought about taking a shortcut as I was walking back to my car but it would have required navigating a downward slope filled with landscaping wood chips. Had I slipped, I would have tumbled right into the pathway of the Del Taco drive through line. I wisely (I think) decided to walk around even though it got yet wetter (if that were possible by then).

    And my key fob thankfully worked!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I was working around in my word processor and ran across this. I wrote it at least a decade ago and I think I posted it. For your amusement if you care.

    The Truant Dental Floss

    Last night I went to brush my teeth
    The way I always do.
    And then I have to work the floss,
    Before the job is through.

    But Lo! It isn’t there I see.
    Now just where could it be?
    I know, it’s with my shaving stuff,
    I’ll find it easily.

    I fumble through the drawer below,
    Stuff for my face and hair,
    But vainly for my dental floss
    It clearly isn’t there.

    What now, sez I, what can I do?
    I must call nine-one-one.
    Some thief broke in and stole my floss,
    Though nothing else is gone.

    In panic now, my floss is gone,
    Oh my, what can I do?
    I know! I’ll just use my wife’s Glide
    ‘Cause every piece is new.

    It puzzles me, I just can’t sleep,
    All night I turn and toss,
    What could have happened to that
    Stupid roll of dental floss?

    Come dawn, now through bleary eyes,
    Say! What is this I see?
    That truant roll of dental floss,
    Just staring back at me.

    That Earhart girl, Virginia Dare,
    Did Oswald act alone?
    Those statues now on Easter Isle,
    Gigantic blocks of stone.

    The Stonehenge., Oh, so many more
    That puzzle mankind so;
    And how that floss got with my socks,
    This world will never know.

    Liked by 8 people

  21. LOL the floss poem. Very lyrical and with a surprise, happy ending. 🙂

    One of our residents posted this today on FB about growing up in the 30s. Sorry for the all caps, I don’t have the time to edit that. 🙂 But I thought it was kind of fun.

    _____________________________________

    KIDS NOW HAVE MANY THINGS TO OCCUPY THEMSELVES WITH.DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION BACK IN 1929-1940 WHAT DID THE KIDS DO FOR ENTERTAINMENT? WE LISTENED TO SPOOKY GHOST STORIES ON THE RADIO AT NIGHT. PROGRAMS LIKE INNER SANCTUM, THE WITCHES TALES AND THE SQUEAKING DOOR AS WELL AS THE SHADOW KNOWS. IN SAN PEDRO WE HAD THE HARBOR AND OCEAN TO DO THINGS LIKE PIER FISHING, SURF FISHING AT CABRILLO BEACH. SWIMMING AT CABRILLO BEACH, BRIGHTON BEACH IN TERMINAL ISLAND, THE B.A.B. BEACH AND THE WEST BASIN. WE HAD SEASONS FOR KITES, YOYOS. SPINNING TOPS AND SLIDING DOWN GRASSY HILLS ON CARD BOARD BOXES WHEN THE GRASS WAS TALL AND GREEN. WE MADE COASTERS FROM 2X4 BOARDS AND WOODEN BOXES WITH SKATES FOR WHEELS. WE PLAYED BOTTLED MILK TOP GAMES. WE PLAYED RIGHT HAND LEFT HAND GAME….WE PLAYED MONOPOLY, CHECKERS, CHINESE CHECKERS, PLAYING CARD GAMES LIKE CASINO, CRAZY 8, WAR, SOLITARY AND OLD MAID.FOR HALLOWEEN WE ALL MADE OUR OWN COSTUMES. WE WALKED ON WOODEN STILTS AND MADE PEA SHOOTERS FROM TUBE VEGETATION AND USED PEPPER TREE PELLETS. WE HAD WARS WITH RUBBER GUNS AND SLING SHOTS AND USED GARBAGE PAIL COVERS FOR SHIELDS. PLAYED ON SAND PILES ON VACANT LOTS. IT WAS THE TIME OF PENNY CANDIES AND WE WOULD RUN THE ALLEYS IN SEARCH OF EMPTY BEER AND SODA BOTTLES AND REDEEM THEM FOR CASH. WE ALSO TURNED IN DEAD AUTO BATTERIES FOR 25 CENTS EACH. CANNED SODA AND BEER WAS NON-EXISTENCE THEN. WE PLAYED KICK THE CAN AND OTHER STREET GAMES AS WELL AS BASEBALL AND FOOT BALL ON EMPTY LOTS. WE WENT TO THE POLLYWOG POND ACROSS FROM THE LOS ANGELES SHIP YARD WHICH LATER WAS RE-NAMED TODD SHIPYARD. WE PLAYED ON RAFTS AND MADE BELIEVE WE WERE PRATE AND TOM SAWYER.THE SCHOOL GAVE US VEGETABLE SEEDS TO GROW IN A GARDEN.SEEDS FOR TOMATOES, GREEN BEANS, EGG PLANT, GREEN PEPPERS AND RADISHES AS WELL AS CORN. EVERY SATUAURDAY AND SUNDAY WE WENT TO THE MOVIES WHICH WAS 5 CENTS FOR KIDS. OTHER GAMES THAT I CAN’T RECALL AT THE MOMENT. NOW KIDS HAVE MANY THINGS TO KEEP THEM OCCUPIED, THINGS WE NEVER HAD OR COULD AFFORD.
    ___________________________

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Donna, I was born in 1930, so I was part of that generation. Only we didn’t have money to buy some of those things. A thumb and forefinger served as a gun when we player cowboys and native Americans. or cops & robbers. one would be Lone Ranger and someone else the bad guys.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. I have a step-nephew that got a job rebuilding those freeways after the Northridge. He made a lot of money, especially since the contractor was getting a bonus for every day the job was done ahead of schedule. So they worked day and night on rotating shifts. I hope they did a good enough job that the bridges do’t collapse prematurely.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I believe I am seeing some cultural appropriation in that first grade class.

    Our seventeen year old is hispanic. Somebody gave him a large garish sombrero. Another gave him a poncho. He is known by a foul derogative name for hispanics. I would call it bullying but he is using it and promoting it himself. I guess he is racist.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.