42 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 8-2-16

  1. Take your phone and stuff with you when you go over to the coffee shop, Kim.

    I am the only person in North Carolina who has ever moved during the time when license plate renewal was due. NCDMV doesn’t know how to deal with it.

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  2. Exhausted at the speaker’s conference (and of course I woke up at 4!). Am giving some sort of speech in a few hours, have no clue as to where to begin!

    It’s all Christians. Grace abounds.

    πŸ™‚

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  3. The header photo is a double-crested cormorant (“double-crested” because of a couple of plumes it grows during breeding season that apparently aren’t usually even very conspicuous then). It doesn’t have waterproof feathers, and like the anhinga it has to hold out its wings to dry after it has been in the water. Cormorants were very common in Florida, and typically were hanging out with brown pelicans.

    Usually I avoid manmade structures in my photos (including telephone wires, houses, etc.) as much as possible unless my photo is of a barn or someone’s house or whatever. Since birds live among people, it’s hard to be so scrupulous as to avoid fence posts, barn roofs, etc. in a bird photo. I also got a closer photo of this bird that shows only the top of the post and has a better look at the bird’s blue eye. But in this case I thought the various colors on the post pair well with the blues and purples in the sky. This is a signpost out in the water, some sort of instruction to boats, and it was taken from the boat.

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  4. I have the CD. I came into the office today and noticed I had a CD in the player. It is from The Essential Johnny Cash disc 2 second song. I have never liked the beginning of it so I always skipped over it until today.

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  5. Early one morning, late one night–last night I couldn’t sleep so I turned on the TV and played Ancient Aliens. I don’t know why but for some reason the voices put me back to sleep except this time it was about the moon and I couldn’t fall back to sleep.

    They were discussing that because of the depth of the craters on the moon that it must have a hard outer shell. They said it must be hollow because when they dropped debris on it, it rang. They talked about how perfectly spaced between the sun and earth it is. They talked about the diameter and how it is the perfect shape to give us solar eclipses. Then they talked about how intelligent life placed it there. It must have been Ancient Aliens. Certainly couldn’t have been God now could it?
    NASA is planning to land on the moon again in 2017

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  6. Nice photo — I love harbor shots with birds perched on docks, boats & wharf pilings. We have red buoys that the sea lions like to all pile onto to sunbathe and nap.

    I’ve heard that song before, way long ago. I’d guess it is from the late 1960s? with the references to political folk music & the draft.

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  7. Yep, Peter, everything is black except the face. When they grow their breeding plumes, some are black and some (according to photos I’ve seen) some grow white plumes. The juveniles are more brown than black. They’re not my favorite birds, but are a bit interesting.

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  8. If those dog laws applied to cows and sheep and goats and horses and pigs, all of America would be vegetarians. A farmer may occasionally bring in a chilled newborn to give it a fresh start but only for a few hours. They certainly are not bringing their herds into the house because it is too warm outside or too cold outside.

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  9. California is considering a law that homeowners have to bring in any nearby coyotes if the weather is outside a certain range considered “room temperature.” The argument is over exactly what temperatures need to be included, or the bill might already have gone through.

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  10. Wait, in Idaho non-vegetarians eat horses? Say it ain’t so. Somehow that is illegal, too, even shipping your horses to another country to become dog food.

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  11. A lot of horses are shipped to Canada or Mexico to be made into dog food or people food. Which means the animals must endure a long miserable trailer ride, often with dead or damaged animals next to them. It would be much more humane to allow the butchering of horses locally. But people do home butcher their animals at times.

    I would hope California is also looking into requiring homeowners to house cougars. It gets mighty warm out there. Poor fellows….

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Ah yes, the new header photo. I think that was one of my husband’s favorites, because he said it feels like you’re up in the sky with the birds.

    These are magnificent frigatebirds. We had an adult female in flight up last week; it’s the bird with the seven- to eight-foot wingspan, usually seen flying (although we did see some perched in a tree on an island) and mostly a Central to South American species. The male has an expandable red throat pouch but is otherwise black (the bird at far right is an adult male); the female has a black body and black head but some white behind her head (top center), and the juveniles have white heads and necks/throats but are otherwise black (the other two birds in the photo). Apparently this is not a family but they just happened to all be close together among the larger group. (They only lay one egg and the male leaves after about 12 weeks but the female stays with the young for the better part of a year. http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/magnificent-frigatebird ) You can see the long hooked beak, forked tail, and extremely long wings.

    After the initial sighting of one female from the boat, we saw quite a few other frigatebirds (though none such a great sighting as that first one). As we approached islands we saw them in groups, mostly in the air. On the way back to the main island on our second boat tour, before we saw the dolphins, we spotted a group of 15 or 20 of these birds (these among them) flying and diving low over the water. The source linked above tells me they take food from the top of the water, barely touching it, but there was no visible food present. At any rate, not only did the captain angle the boat that way so we could get closer, but for the first time I saw him take out his own camera, with a very long bird-friendly lens. (He might have taken it out earlier and I never saw, but I suspected most of what we saw, he saw every day, but this was special even to him.) Since it wasn’t breeding season, I didn’t see the male’s throat pouch at all; in one photo I saw a hint of red on his throat, but I couldn’t even find that photo again when I was looking for it.

    We stayed near them for several minutes, with the mix of huge birds, bright blue water, cloud-littered pretty sky, and island backdrops being good enough for the animal channel. I think our boat tour ended up being longer than the advertised maximum because there were (for summer) such good bird sightings that day, and then the dolphins showed up. Not huge numbers, maybe just one or two, but we did see dolphins and a better sighting of them than the first day when we saw only dorsal fins.

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  13. My phone is back on slow speed so that tends to keep me off the internet. I had to go grocery shop this a.m. since supplies had dwindled. I hope I can find time to cook the fresh things before they go to waste. Sometimes it seems it would be less wasteful to do a daily stop by the grocery store.

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  14. That former header pic (now the 2nd photo) looks like a totem pole on mobile πŸ™‚

    Trying to read a fascinating coyote study but now have to go to a crime scene since our cop reporter is off all week

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  15. If it’s supposed to get really cold, then the government issues a stock warning , telling farmers to make sure their animals are in the barn. But, since most of the hog farms are factories, the animals never leave confinement, which seem less humane to me. So the warning is for cattle and horses.

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  16. I sent the new header for two reasons: (1) to show how large the flocks of frigatebirds were that we saw (notice there are additional birds in the trees as well); this wasn’t a random bird here and there but a good number of them and (2) I think it’s funny. As far as I can tell, every bird in the photo is a magnificent frigatebird . . . except that lone white ibis in the middle who feels like he took a wrong turn at Tampa.

    This photo was also taken from a boat (all of today’s were), and we’re looking ahead at an island.

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  17. My youngest just messaged me two photos.
    One of them is of all four of my children together smiling with arms around each other.
    Made me cry
    My goal as a mom was and is, for my children to be lifelong friends and this picture shows that
    Ages 32 to 40

    Liked by 4 people

  18. I’m always amused when I see costs of an average wedding–amused because it’s possible to have one so very much cheaper. Of course, we avoided all of the biggest cost: renting a venue, offering a full meal, and alcohol. But extravagant gowns and other costs can run it way up too–unnecessarily. Anyway, according to “the Knot” (which probably has reasons to prefer higher averages, and whose readers just might spend more than non-readers . . . though I copied a dress found on the Knot for my own fairly inexpensive dress), the average wedding in 2015 cost $32,641. (Ours five years ago cost less than 10% of that.) That wasn’t the most amazing statistic, though: The astounding catering cost of $273/ person! That does not include wedding cake or the venue, just the meal.

    Sorry, but that is utterly ridiculous. If you want only immediate family at your wedding and feeding all of them the week they are in town costs that much per person, oh well. But when a wedding costs so much that you can’t invite friends from church or neighbors you’re close to, it costs too much. And when a per-person cost is enough to feed a small family for a month, it costs too much. Feeding a meal is a nice gesture if you can afford it (having friends and family make the food)–we didn’t feel like we could afford it, and so we didn’t–but it shouldn’t be seen as essential.

    And $30,000 plus can be better spent in other ways than on one extravagant day. Keep it under $10,000 (preferably under $5,000) and stay out of debt, or put the rest of the money you would have spent for a down payment on a house.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. The new pic makes me think someone fired a gun.

    Annie was stalking something in the backyard this morning, I couldn’t see what it was until a butterfly fluttered away from her (yay). Escape. Annie got up and slouched back toward the house, defeated.

    Spent a good part of my day standing on a thoroughfare median (thankfully there was some shade) near a crime seen for an officer-involved shooting. Lots of TV folks there (the reporters are usually primadonnas — not all of them though — in their skin tight, high-fashion dresses and heels. But the camera and tech guys are always very friendly & down to earth).

    Anyway, done with that.

    Back to the coyotes (there’s another city meeting on that tomorrow morning).

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  20. Donna – Please tell me that Cheryl’s comment about California considering a law for homeowners to bring coyotes in the house if the temps are outside a certain parameter is a joke. It seems like a joke, but these days it’s hard to tell.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Yes, Karen, I made that up. πŸ™‚ Doesn’t it seem a logical extension, though, and just a slight exaggeration of some actual CA laws?

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I don’t think most people around here have large enough barns for all of their stock. They are expected to find an out of the wind spot and huddle in. They have very tough hides and put out a lot of heat. As long as they have food and water and can get out of the wind, they seem to do well. I am told it is more important to see that they can get out of the sunshine in the summer as they overheat with that.

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  23. Well, one of the things they usually see about an abused dog is that “it had no food or water!” Hmm. Misten gets fed just twice a day (in the summer just once, as she isn’t interested in breakfast in the hot months, and after she has turned it down for a week straight, I stop offering it–this is actually her first summer to have just one meal a day since we moved to Indiana, probably because she generally gets more exercise in a bigger yard, but this summer she is only getting fed at 8:00 at night). So if the do-gooders show up during the daytime they will find her without food. Oh no!

    Furthermore, when I put her outside, they will find her without water. Why? Because the sparrows find it and foul it within 10-15 minutes. Not only is it undrinkable, not only do I have to wash her water bowl, but she ends up being “without water” and I don’t realize she is without water because I actually gave her some. Before I discovered that pattern, she might be outside for three hours and I didn’t worry about her since she had water, but I’d go outside and her water would be brown from the dirt of sparrows bathing, and with poop in it too. So now I put her out without water, but Iknow she doesn’t have water, and I don’t leave her out more than an hour in the cool part of the day, or 20 minutes in the warm part of the day, without opening the door and asking if she wants to come inside. She coimes in and drinks, and then sometimes asks to go back out. Or she comes in and doesn’t drink but just lies down.

    But if anyone were to come check on her welfare, and she happens to be outside, most likely she will be outside without food and water.

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  24. How would you fit hundreds of cows in a barn anyway, and who wants to gather in the bitter cold? Seems like cruel and unusual punishment for the poor horses used to get the cows in.

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  25. In this area most farmers don’t have the cattle out in the open pasture in winter, but in the lot near the barn. There are not a lot of large ranches in Northeast Missouri.

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  26. I also have a new computer and now all my files are on it. So nice to have a help desk to take care of these things. I took him some chocolate as a thank you. We do pay for their time, but not much.
    This computer is refurbished and the a key only works when it wants to. Oh, well

    Liked by 1 person

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