Our Daily Thread 1-18-14

Good Morning!

And Happy Saturday! 🙂

On this day in 1778 English navigator Captain James Cook discovered the Hawaiian Islands, which he called the “Sandwich Islands.”

In 1788 the first English settlers arrived in Australia’s Botany Bay to establish a penal colony. The group moved north eight days later and settled at Port Jackson.

In 1896 the x-ray machine was exhibited for the first time.

In 1911, for the first time, an aircraft landed on a ship. Pilot Eugene B. Ely flew onto the deck of the USS Pennsylvania in San Francisco harbor.

In 1919 the World War I Peace Congress opened in Versailles, France.

And in 1964 the plans for the World Trade Center in New York were disclosed.

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Quote of the Day

“The contest for ages has been to rescue liberty from the grasp of executive power.”

Daniel Webster

Seems like it still is.

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Today is Heather Payne’s birthday, from PointofGraceMusic.

Today is also the birthday of composer Cesar Cui. From Selecteum des Arts et des Sciences CCU

And it’s the birthday of composer Alexis-Emmanuel Chabrier too.

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Anyone have a QoD?

And here’s a picture of Janice’s kitten Bosley.

bosley

88 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 1-18-14

  1. I dub Bosley the official blog mascot.
    Evening everyone. It has been a quiet Saturday. I spent a couple of hours at school putting names on new books and getting ready for two new students.

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  2. I am awake. I was up past midnight and Amos took mercy on my and let me sleep until almost 8. Last night we went to see When the Saints Go Marching In at Cockroach Hall. It poked fun at a lot of things Old Mobile, like back in the 80’s when that big group of Protestants out on Cottage Hill put up all the billboards along Airport Blvd saying that Mardi Gras was of the Devil. One character was a Sorority Girl at Alabama and about to make her debut at the Camelia Ball. Her mother had had to take to selling RESIDENTIAL Real Estate because her husband the Attorney had started taking too many pro bono cases. He had faked a skiing accident in Aspen so he could get back to Mobile in time to be “queen” of the Comic Cowboys.

    I discovered last night that I live South of the Salt Line, which is taken from a 1984 novel by Elizabeth Spencer. ” It is an imaginary line about 75 miles from the Coast that runs East and West through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. It is another world It is more Southern than the Deep South. It’s where the fiery Mediterranean temperament==French , Spanish, Greek- clashes with the cooler Anglo attitude which migrated from the Bible Belt. It’s where the descendent of slaves struggles to maintain his rich African culture.
    It is where your automobile rusts from the salt air, the house paint peels, and ladies no longer perspire, but do serious sweatin:’ (I disagree with this).
    When a Yankee (that’s anyone North of Birmingham) moves South of the Salt Line, he learns to conserve energy to endure the year-round Gulf Coast humidity. He talks more slowly. To avoid dehydration, he mixes cool summer drinks all year long. On the Coast we drink iced-tea in the dead of winter, and Gin and Tonic in January is never considered gauche. Our converted Southerner joins in at Mardi Gras to nurture the eclectic Mediterranean culture he quickly perceives as worth of preservation.
    Through it all he learns to cuss and complain, the salt, the sand, the heat, and this *&^% humidity.”

    We went with a group of friends so it was fun. I saw on Facebook this morning that they shut Callahan’s Irish Social Club down sometime in the wee hours of this morning. I was tucked safely in my bed.

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  3. Thank you, AJ, for posting Bosley’s photo. This is the first of two cat beds we are receiving from the person at work. I probably need to attach some pink ribbons to Miss Bosley’s throne, make that Queen Bosley. Sometimes I have been calling her Kittina Bozalena.

    A J’s cat should be our mascot! But Chas’ pet rock truly ROCKS, too.

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  4. A cat in the house could mean nothing but trouble. Just ask those children in the famous book by the expert: Theodore Geisel, AKA Dr. Seuss. It documents what happens when a cat wearing human headgear enters the domain of said humans. So, Mumsee is correct to be alarmed at a cat in the house. Those people who let them in to take care of the mice should realize that a cat outside prevents the mice form entering in the first place!

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  5. Cheryl, I prescribe a dose of doggy breath to help with the cat allergies.
    🙂

    Misten is so beautiful. As a child I once visited at someone’s home where they had a collie. It was the first time I remember wanting a pet. It seemed like a dream pet, and of course Lassie programs on tv reinforced the longing. But then stray cats entered our lives and ended up being my consolation. Dogs just need to purr and then they’d be purrfect.

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  6. Dogs don’t need to purr. They come running and jump up and down, and they notice if you’re carrying something so they can trip you up.
    Also, they protect the house from other critters like stray cats and squirrels. They are especilygood for young boys who can chase and wrestle them.
    They especially love to play “keep away”.
    NO Kidding. A dog can become part of the family. At best, you share the same residence with a cat..

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  7. Bosley! Eeeeeeee. She’s so cute on her fuzzy, baby-blue cushion. 😀 😀

    Annie hijacks the dogs’ beds a lot, she likes to curl up right in the center of the gigantic “floor pillows.” Leaving no room for a dog, of course.

    I slept in today which felt wonderful.

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  8. My Boy loves me. He and Lulabelle always meet me at the door. Mo does not recognize me as deserving to breath the same air as she does despite the fact that I gave her the liquid off the can of tuna the other day AND carried her from the bedroom to the top of the dryer so the dogs wouldn’t bother her.

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  9. Keva loves us both, but so does the cat. The cat comes when we open the door and runs off with Keva to play. We’ve never fed him at the door, so he’s not looking for food…

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  10. Well, Misten does what I term the dog version of a purr. If you pet her late at night when she’s a little drowsy, she does a very low growly sound that says, “I really like that!” So is she perfect? (No, she isn’t. But she’s a very good dog.)

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  11. We locked our cat in the office last night–she yowls so much, demanding me to get up and feed her–not to mention hogging my side of the bed–that we gave up.

    We all slept better.

    I’m coming around to the no pet zone of happiness these days . . .

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  12. Bosley really likes my husband. When he begins unlocking the door to come inside, Bosely will jump out of my lap to go see him. When husband was trying to put socks on to go to work, Bosley got on top of his feet to nap rather than nap beside me. That is saying she has a lot of love because my husband has stinky feet. I told husband Bosely must think I have really bad breath if she prefers his feet as a nap mat. I think because she was somehow parted from her mom and sibs at such a young age that it makes her feel closer to us. Husband allows her to play more roughly with him so he is more like a favored sib and I am more like mama cat to her.

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  13. One of the activities for Sunday School is for the children to think up a mnemonic sentence to help them remember the order of the Ten Commandments. Those are first letters of a group of words in a sentence to aid memory. Just wondering if anyone here has any memory helpers for the Ten Commandments?

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  14. gorgeous in Ukarumpa too, green hills everywhere. No church today, they want us to go to a valley church. I will go to a praise time tonight and prayer time this afternoon. Time to make lasagne to fill my freezer before school starts. Someone made cottage cheese for me so I’m all set.

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  15. We took son to the Idaho Youth Challenge. It looks and sounds like just the thing. A lot of good people who care about children and education. Enough to quit their day jobs and take on this challenge. Turned out it took us closer to six hours than the expected two but it was all good.

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  16. OK. Start praying either for me or for BG. I have let her take my truck and go pick up a girl friend and go to a bonfire at a guy’s house. Lots of other children there and luckily I graduated from high schooll with the dad.

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  17. She just sent me a picture of the mom. Smart phones can work in the parent’s interest as well. She has until 10pm Central to call and tell me she is leaving. She will have to drop her friend off and then be home by 10:20

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  18. Chas, I can see prayers starting to be answered. She is becoming a good girl. For a while she was out of control. She is much more respectful these days and is a lot better.

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  19. Yup, it is Bridging Two Hearts. I am now loading it on my kindle since I always download to my computer. What a fun way to finish off my school break. Amazon had it for 99cents, so you should all get it now.

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  20. I just got back from a concert by a husband and wife team named Jenny and Tyler. Has anyone ever heard of them? They play mostly contemporary/alternative Christian music, but cover some secular songs as well. Their latest is a project whose proceeds go towards organizations that fight human trafficking. They played some of those dongs, including their rendition of Simon and Garfunkel’s “Sound of Silence”. I’ve always liked that song, and their version was almost better than the original. Check them out: http://jennyandtyler.com/

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  21. so that comment worked, but not the real one.
    Just finished reading Bridging Two Hearts, clever title and fits well with the ending. I liked the admirals wife, she added spice and perspective. I felt like Michelle knew each person she was writing about, so she brought them to life for us. I will even reread it.

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  22. I agree Jo. I appreciate the time and research Michelle puts into her books. I can’t stand it when things aren’t real or realistic – it makes me question everything else in the story. It’s definitely on the re-read shelf. I also Googled the Coronado bridge – it’s huge!

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  23. Guess who is up and going to church with her Mommy? She has to. She has to drive. I have lost a contact in my left eye–that means it is in there but I can’t see and I can’t get it out. I have been trying since 7 am. I can see out of my right eye, but not my left.
    Eventually it will work itself out but couldn’t it do it on a better time schedule?

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  24. A question for our resident writers & editors: If a young, aspiring writer refers to her love of writing as her love of “wordcraft”, which would you consider her use of that word to be? . . .

    a. clever/creative

    b. poetic

    c. pretentious

    Non-writers/editors may chime in, if they choose. 🙂

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  25. Karen, a google search of the phrase turns up a game, a book, and a few blogs. It isn’t a phrase I would use, but she probably means she is creative and clever. I would say she is pretentious, of course I am not one to brag on myself (at least I hope I am not). If YOU say “Kim, has a way with words, it is almost an art form with her” then I am flattered. If I say it, I am bragging on how clever I am and being pretentious.

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  26. I’d say “wordcraft” is a good word, and suggests more than just putting words on paper to communicate something. A person who writes textbooks on algebra may be a writer, but probably not a wordcraft.

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  27. Kim, that happened to me once when I was wearing contacts. I finally was able to get to it, but it took a while. Somehow they slip off to the side or below or on top and out of sight. Arrgh. Doesn’t happen often, but it kind of freaked me out, I wondered it it could slide all the way around to the back of your eye! (It can’t, at least I’m pretty sure it can’t.) 😮

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  28. I guess I’m biased, because I know the person who used the word, & in her case, I’d call it pretentious. And I feel a bit guilty about that, because I like to give people the benefit of the doubt, but I’ve seen enough from this young lady to know she has a high opinion of herself, & thinks she’s pretty clever.

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  29. Kim, I could not locate my glasses right before time to leave for church, so I was having similar difficulties as you were having. The worst part for me is not being able to read the words to the songs on the screen.

    Wordcraft works for some types of writing in my opinion but not for others. Maybe for writing songs or ads. Ibuse to try to write a little concrdte poetry which is where you write the poetry to fit into a picture (made of the words) of the subject of the poetry. To me that is wordcraft.

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  30. Wikipedia has a good concrete poetry explanation if you want to see what it might look or sound like. Would post a link but Smartphone is having issues.

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  31. I have a couple questions for anyone interested in answering them. First, how familiar are you with the Harry Potter books/movies? And second, what is your opinion of Christians partaking of the series? Caveats? Dangers? No problem under given circumstances?

    (I guess that’s more than a couple questions.) 😉

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  32. 60 degrees and the blessed sun is shining. I am so happy sitting on the patio and reading.

    6arrows I was adamantly opposed to Harry Potter until I read them. They are about good over evil. More later

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  33. 6 Arrows, those books started appearing as my son was growing up and part of the first target audience. I did not encourage my son to read them partly because we did not know where the stories were headed. Secondly, time for reading better literature would have been diminished. So while at home and homeschooling we did not venture into those books. Recently my son told me he had read them. So that would have been as a college student. I did not feel badly that he read them at that age. I suppose it is a cultural thing and he now has one more thing in common with his peers. I have not wanted to read them myself though.

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  34. I don’t know about HarryPotter, but I highly recommend The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings series for any age. “Hobbit” is more a children’s book, but you need to read it before LOTR or you won’t be familiar with Hobbits. It’s interesting in it’s own right, and without it, you won’t be familiar with Gullum and The Ring..

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  35. I have (almost, 315 of 365 pages) finished reading Things That Matter by Charles Krauthammer. I like Krauthammer and his book was interesting. However, it is misnamed. “Things that matter” is an opinion. And, in my opinion, some of the entries were not that important. e.g “Life by Manuel”, a dissertation on living by various manuals, brought on by the alleged “parenting skills” in the Woody Allen-Mia Farrow custody fight. Which fight eluded my attention in 1991.
    The book is a collection of his previous articles about various subjects. I enjoyed reading them, but it is a rather difficult read in that there is no continuity. That is, each article is separate from everything else. You could easily start at the back of the book and read forward.

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  36. The Harry Potter books/movies never interested me (so I didn’t read/see them — a co-worker was a big fan, though, she devoured each book as soon as it was released and saw all the movies).

    I suspect much of the ruckus made over them in some Christian quarters when they were so popular, though, was a bit overdone and counterproductive.

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  37. Harry Potter – the first book was very captivating. It had a lot of fun things and got ahold of your imagination. I think that I only read the first three or four. What I found was that each one got deeper and deeper into evil and demonic things. Very scary. I felt that she captured you with the first one and then took you somewhere you should not be. Thus I have not read the rest. It was interesting to me that I went to see the first movie with my son and his college roommate and the roommate got up and left and did not stay and see the whole thing.

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  38. Kim, you mentioned that your husband had severe back pain. You also mentioned an operation. I don’t have a doctorate in any field, especially medicine. However, I would try several things before I let someone cut on my back, unless it was a specific identified muscle problem. I have a Bro-in-law who gets some satisfaction from a chiropractor, and I have heard that acupuncture helps others. I would try that before going under a knife.
    Also, there is an article in this month’s Purdue Alumnus about research on spinal cord injuries. It says:
    “The toxic, called acrolein, is produced in the body after nerve cells are injured, triggering a cascade of biological events thought to worsen the injury’s severity. The drug hydralazine, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for hypertension, has been shown to be effective in reducing acrolein levels in the body.”
    The article continues, but that is the important part.

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  39. Kim, cold laser (low intensity) therapy has been shown to help as well. We use a Bioflex laser (bioflexlaser.com) in our office and have helped many people. I work for a chiropractor and we also have a massage therapist and an acupuncturist. One therapy will help one person and another therapy will help someone else. My husband loves the laser – he responds very well to it. I couldn’t find a place close to your area that had the laser we have, but it might be worth looking into. The biggest drawback that I have seen is the cost.

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  40. He has a titanium fusion. I am going to mention accupuncture. The problem is that he has 30 years of medical experience so he “know more than I do”. 😉
    Our Deacon at church (an Anglican Deacon is different that a Baptist Deacon) told me about the accupuncturist he uses. He has a PhD in Physical Therapy and a degree/certification in accupuncture. He is also the nephew of my GP.

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  41. If you read all the Harry Potter books, Harry who is good triumphs over the “Dark Arts”. Back when the books came out I was Mrs. Espicopal Church Woman and doing one Kay Arthur Bible Study after another. I would not let my child trick or treat and I was opposed to anything having to do with witch craft. We were discussing them in graduate school education classes at a Jesuit College. One of my classmates told me to READ the book for myself before I passed judgement and offered me hers to read. I have read them all and do thing that they grow with the orignal target audience and maturity level helps you discern right from wrong.

    I believe Michelle has shared her opinion of them in the past. They might actually be old news now and disdained.

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  42. I have found some goodies in Karuthammer.
    “Whatever the wisdom of the Iraq War in the first place, when Obama came into office in January 2009 the war was won. We had a golden opportunity to reap the rewards of this too-bloody war by establishing a strategic relationship with an Iraq that was still under American sway. Iraqi airspace, for example was under U.S. control as we prepared to advise and rebuild Iraq’s nonexistent air force.

    With our evacuation, however, Iraqi airspace effectively belongs to Iran – over which it is flying weapons, troops and advisers to turn the tide in Syria. The U.S. air bases, the vast military equipment, the intelligence sources available in Iraq were all abandoned. Gone. Now we are trying to hold the line in Jordan.
    Obama is learning very late that, for a superpower, inaction is a form of action. You can abdicate, but your really can’t hide. History will find you. It has found Obama.”

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  43. Here is my final thought on the subject…I had a Bible teacher in high school. He said he read a book 3 times. First time for content, second time for pleasure, and I forget why he read it a third time. I suppose that some wouldn’t make it to Level 2 depending on content. Maybe you should check the book out of the library and read it yourself for content and see if it is something you would or wouldn’t let your children read.

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  44. 6 Arrows, some scattered thoughts on Harry Potter. First, I have read them all, though not “as they came out.” The first was much better than I expected, with some nice, imaginative elements. One of them (I think it was #4) was really bad; I read later that she didn’t let her editor touch that one, and it really showed.

    I haven’t been inclined to reread any. I watched the first movie, and I was distracted by the fact that my group had a very young child in it (four, I think), and there was no way I’d take a young child to a movie so intense. But I thought the movie really dragged and wasn’t interesting. I’ve heard that subsequent ones are better, but I have no desire to test that assertion.

    I’d be inclined to allow a discerning teenager read them, and talk about them. I don’t think the book glorifies evil, and the “magic” used in the book is fictional. Harry and his friends are a certain kind of being that has a certain kind of power that we do not have.

    But I have two things I’d want to discuss with my own child, if she were reading the books. One is that concept that magic exists in fantasy and witches and such people are make-believe with some good and some evil. In the real world there is such a thing as “witches” and insofar as they can conduct “magic,” they are doing so with Satan’s power. Here is where I simply wish she had named her characters something other than witches and warlocks, because I’d want to explain that witches are usually just make-believe, but whether in make-believe or in the religions of witchcraft, witches are actually using bad powers; they aren’t innocent or funny. Again, I think it’s more a matter of terminolofy. With this caveat, I have little problem with the kinds of magic employed in the books. The “Halloween” aspects of it are more like grade-school stuff when we were in school, not deep, dark stuff.

    Here’s the second element, and to me actually more dangerous: Harry is his own authority. Again and again, adults in the books tell him or his friends not to do a particular thing. Sometimes the adults are bad, and sometimes they are wise, but repeatedly Harry is forbidden to do something, he does it, and the results are good. I think this gives a really bad message. If you want to have the characters left with no choice but to do the thing forbidden (they are drowning or locked in a cabin and it’s life or death, or they do it accidentally), and have the good result be stronger than the bad result, OK. If you want to have them act in disobedience, and in spite of themselves it works out in the end (the bad guy chases them because they made the stupid choice, but they get away), OK. But don’t have the act of disobedience be the defining moment that saves everyone. Life rarely works that way, and it’s a really bad life lesson to teach. It’s even worse when it’s subtle and kids don’t understand the lesson, but simply pick it up over time. I don’t think adults should write fiction that’s thinly designed morality plays, but neither do I think that bad choices should be what is taught.

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  45. Thanks much for all your answers to my Harry Potter questions! I don’t have time to comment further, but I appreciate your taking the time to respond. 🙂

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  46. Hey, thanks everyone for your kind comments! I read them on the phone while my husband drove me between parties this afternoon and was able to put the link up on my FB page.

    I’m honored and gratified that you recognize all that research–especially having to get three different massages . . . 🙂

    As to Harry Potter, I mostly agree with Misten’s owner on the quality of the books and particularly her second point. I hated the fact Harry always got away with breaking the rules and my daughter heard about it a great deal!

    The fourth one, or so (I can’t keep them straight no matter how many times we’ve seen the movies. I only read the books once), was a disaster with 100 pages that easily could have been cut out. Even children I knew recognized that was one was overpadded.

    I read them as they came out both because of my job but also because I was having trouble with my daughter. Harry Potter provided a “neutral” ground on which we could work out our relationship issues during her challenging junior high years.

    Indeed, I even wrote a blog post entitled Harry Pottery and the end of my daughter’s Childhood!

    Looking through the blog now, I see it spells out my feelings pretty well: http://wp.me/p3HcoH-6J

    I’m pretty liberal about children and books. The only kid author I wouldn’t allow in my house was Phillip Pullham–because his expressed goal with his books was to convince kids to not love God. Otherwise, I’ve allowed them to read anything. Some books I’ve insisted they read along with me–so I’ve either read them aloud when the children were young, or read them in tandem.

    Movies, we’re been more careful about their ages and if in doubt have watched with them. My reasoning on that is when you read a book all the imagination you can bring to it is what you’ve experienced yourself. When you see a movie, someone else’s eyes are imprinted in your mind. That could be dangerous.

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  47. Yes, you obviously had to research those massages very carefully, Michelle! It was a fun book and felt like the characters were personal friends of yours. Well done

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