105 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 2-27-21

  1. Good Morning Everyone. Up early and will be out of the door soon. I am showing my aunt’s house at 8 am and then driving to Perdido Key and will be showing property from 10 to 1.
    Some of the properties I had requested are already under contract

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  2. Interesting mix of conversations last night.

    Re: children in church: We let our toddlers play quietly or look at books or color until they were school age. Then they had to listen to the sermon and “take notes”. The oldest focused on the sermon. The girls either took notes or doodled. I read or heard that doodling while listening helps the brain remember better. I have no problem with children doing quiet things like coloring or drawing during a sermon. We would all be surprised at how much they hear and remember.

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  3. As for what I’m reading: I found a series about famous blacks in America. It’s a fictionalized account of their lives. Right now I’m reading about Harriet Tubman’s childhood. I believe the books are based on historical or (auto)biographical accounts.

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  4. Good morning. It’s foggy here. I chose not to go on the prayer walk since my sinuses seem a bit stirred up. I was glad to know at least two people would be walking and they can walk faster without me along.

    My brother had to pick up Art this a.m. to go to the office since Art’s car that he retrieved from the repair shop is at the office. That saved me from having to drop Art off at the office. I have not driven on the expressways here in a long time and hope to stay off of them if possible.

    At one point, Wesley had a very large drawing pad that he took everywhere. He was very content to draw while in church. I don’t think the pastor cared much for it, but it worked for us.

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  5. As I was saying, I do not care for seeing children using devices during the church service. The worst thing I have seen was a man, an unemployed pastor, who would read the newspaper throughout the time of my pastor’s sermon. He must have been resentful of not having a preaching position so acted out in that way. He really set a bad example for any children who happened to notice.

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  6. Morning! I love the cardinal photo up there…aren’t they just the most stunning creation? Brings a smile to the face every time!
    I am a note taker during church…perhaps it’s beginnings was the doodling as a child during church but I know it just helps me with memory of the subject.

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  7. Wow, Janice, that seems very disrespectful of that former pastor and maybe things like that are why he is ‘former.’

    My daughter in TN has sent pictures of many, many cardinals at her house this year. It seems to be a banner year for them down there. They sure make for nice photos.

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  8. I am currently reading a Maeve Binchy novel, A Week in Winter and a book written by Ben Sasse. I enjoy the novel and have found the other book interesting. You have to always keep in mind a politician’s purpose for writing is usually being elected again and/or movin’ on up. With that in mind, it is enlightening. There is always something to learn.

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  9. The photo reminds me that Christmas will come again.

    I suppose my note-taking is related to my job, in a large way, but I also remember being an avid note-taker in college.

    I’ve appreciated the work that Dr. Fauci has done throughout this pandemic, and sometimes that meant delivering a lot of hard truths.

    But I also think that now, please, let’s not dismiss any kind of optimism out of hand after all we’ve been through. I saw someone on the CBS national news last night warning of yet another surge coming our way, saying “We may be done with the virus, but the virus isn’t done with us!” Someone else said we need to beware of optimism.

    I’ve posted the Makary column here before, I think, and sent it to a couple of my friends. I don’t know if things will roll out as well as he predicts, but much of what he says also makes sense — that with the vaccines, we are very close to turning the corner and, with a few bumps in the road still likely, we can — finally — look forward to an end to this and perhaps sooner rather than later.

    https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/bill-maher-dr-anthony-fauci-downer-marty-makary-coronavirus

    _______________________________

    Maher rips ‘downer’ Fauci, praises Dr. Marty Makary: ‘Can we be a little happy?’
    ‘I don’t want to wear masks forever!’ the HBO star exclaimed

    “Real Time” host Bill Maher took some shots over the pessimistic tone that’s been set in combatting the coronavirus pandemic despite all the progress the country has made over the past year.

    Maher even singled out for criticism Dr. Anthony Fauci, one of the most prominent figures in the Biden administration, claiming the doctor was “always a downer.”

    Instead, Maher said he prefers the upbeat approach of Dr. Marty Makary of Johns Hopkins University, who has called for schools to be reopened.

    “Can we be a little happy?” Maher began. “Can we be a little happy about where we are COVID-wise as opposed to … It’s just like they really don’t want you. I think it’s counterproductive. I really do. The constant gloom and doom and it’s always a new strain from Satan that’s coming. …

    Maher quoted Makary, a Fox News contributor, who recently predicted, based on current trajectories, that “COVID will be mostly gone by April, allowing Americans to resume normal life.”

    “I don’t know who Dr. Marty Makary is and I don’t care. … I love him,” Maher reacted. “I think he’s right. …
    ____________________________

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  10. On Facebook, MakeItMan once posted a photo of the artistic doodling he had done during the sermon that Sunday morning. 🙂 (He’s talented!)

    *******
    Yesterday afternoon, I had my follow-up appointment with my surgeon. Everything is healing nicely. He said that the pathology report on my removed gallbladder showed that it had been chronically ill, and that it was causing some digestive matters that will most probably clear up now. I should be able to eat whatever I want, but of course, if I find that a particular kind of food gives me trouble, I should avoid it. I am relieved that this is over. Just waiting for the largest of my four incisions to heal more. (It is fine, but still sensitive.)

    *******
    Funny snippet from my conversation with Nightingale over dinner last night:

    Boy and Gabby were playing upstairs while she and I had a “fancy” dinner downstairs. She made her delicious seafood and pasta dinner, and served it on our special plates, with a glass of Chardonnay for us each. In the midst of this fancy dinner, she did something inappropriate – I forget exactly, but I think she let out a loud burp. In mock indignation I said, “I can’t take you anywhere!”

    Then I thought about it and pointed out that since I don’t drive, “I literally cannot take you anywhere!” We had a good laugh at that.

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  11. Good morning. I have been out playing in the snow and up riding my bike. Now it is time to get to Saturday morning cleanup.

    When my children were smaller, maybe two or three, I would do a bit of drawing on the program if they were too distracted. I learned early with current fourteen year old that that was not good for him. Nor was sitting near any other child who was doodling or reading or playing on a device. If he is allowed to sit and play with his hands, look out the window, watch the clock, he hears the message. Often laughing appropriately or expressing obvious connection, even answering questions from the pulpit. But with those other distractions, he is completely eaten up and nothing gets through at all. The idea for me was they can learn to sit still for forty minutes or whatever. Twenty in some cases. Makes for much nicer car rides. Even across the country when they don’t need to be entertained but can entertain themselves.

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  12. So yes, I’m choosing to be “a little happy” at this stage. True, case numbers (apparently, from what I heard last night) are going up again in some places; but seriously, if enough folks are vaccinated quickly (12% had been vaccinated as of last Wednesday in our local community), it seems only logical (based on “THE SCIENCE” which everyone likes to quote now) that this thing will be gone at some point and perhaps in the relatively near future.

    The doom and gloom dragging on like it is isn’t helping anyone’s outlook. Sure, continue to be careful, it’s not over yet. But is is so terrible to realize that there’s at last a light at the end of the tunnel that may be closer than we think? (no, not a train!) haha

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  13. I agree, always down, down, down by the President and Fauci. I am not asking anyone not to speak the truth, but there are ways of speaking that don’t lead people into despair.

    As far as beaches go, I live close to many beaches. I live in the Land of 10,000 Lakes and those are just the bigger lakes. We used to have a beach about four miles away. It was, unfortunately, bought by someone when a mining company sold the land. It took the locals (to the disgust of the new landowners) a long time to realize their public beach was no longer public. It is only a few miles more to a more developed campground and public beach, but spoiled people can be quite stubborn. I, myself, used to join another mother there almost everyday. My children learned to swim there.

    A woman from the local YMCA had a swim class there through community education. I enrolled my two older daughters, but took them out after making a complaint to the school. That was on the day when I watched the teacher take the neighbor boy out over his head and tell him she was going to let go of him and make him swim to shore if he did not do what she was asking. The kid was screaming at the top of his lungs. My children had never been afraid of water and I was not going to let this woman make them afraid. I taught them myself after that. I was not the best teacher, but they could swim enough to not drown and later all three had swim classes in school. They had to catch up on some of the types of swimming, but they were just fine. I think everyone should know how to swim enough to stay afloat. That is just a survival skill.

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  14. Mumsee – In your opinion, can sitting still include doodling, drawing, or coloring? In my own opinion, I think it can.

    I know responsible adults who “need” to do something like that to stay focused, and it helps them absorb more of the message. Some who take notes do so not necessarily to review them later, but as their own way of doodling with words, so to speak.

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  15. I once had a VBS student who was so disruptive that I asked the pastor to come into our class and help just with him. The pastor was no help at all, which I should have known. I learned to put a blanket on the floor under the table and we all sat under that table for the lesson. I still remember the excitement from this child in learning about the resurrection. He was not from our area, but visiting someone, so I have no idea how anything went with his life. Children are all so different.

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  16. Kathaleena – My dad’s father was a tough German man. He decided to teach my father to swim by taking him out in a boat and then throwing him overboard. Dad started to drown, and his Uncle Billy jumped in and saved him.

    As an adult, Dad was a strong man and no wimp, but he kept a fear of water to the end. In their backyard pool, he would always be in an innertube or some kind of floating circle, bobbing around.

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  17. As long as my children were not disturbing others, they were fine. Our church has busy sheets with bible type puzzles etc. that they have available for children. I was also one who handed over the bulletin (and whatever other papers we were given) to the children for doodling purposes. Sometimes I am bored to death over sermons, so I am not sure why I wouldn’t expect my children to be, too. Some sermons could be cut by a half and say what is being said. I do agree with mumsee, that all children must learn there are times to be still and, yes, they can do it for long enough for a sermon.

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  18. Kizzie, of course that stuff is fine, depending on the child. I just found it unnecessary for most of my children most of the time, including thirty or so foster children. And dangerous to some, including fourteen year old. So, in my opinion, just like “don’t offer my children candy, please”, “don’t offer my children paper and crayons when we come into your church”. I would prefer they sit quietly, as they can.

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  19. Yes, Kizzie, I have heard of parents or other doing that. It is so unnecessary in my opinion.

    Of course, sometimes parents only need to give their children ‘the eye.’ Then there are the others…

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  20. I have one child, youngest, who cannot swim and cannot float. We have had her in swim lessons and taken her to the pool and rivers and lakes ourselves. But she just cannot float. I had heard of people before who could not swim and knew one girl at Scout camp who could not swim, but I had though it was because nobody taught them. Maybe some just can’t float and can’t swim. She almost can in the hot tub. I suspect a lot of it is just plain fear.

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  21. CBD, you will be interested to know that one continues in transit and is on target to arrive Tuesday. The other is in Chicago, working its way over.

    Lions to all.

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  22. When I was very young and we were still living in the Hollywood area, my mom signed me up for swim lessons at the local park pool..

    On the first day, sensing I was extremely nervous, the instructor, probably some college-age kid, put his hand on top of my head and forcibly held me under water.

    Well, that didn’t go well, as you might guess.

    I didn’t learn to swim until I was in 7th grade after that episode. It was terrifying (and my mom was furious, we never went back).

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  23. Learning to swim for me came during a summer class sponsored at the junior high school, we were maybe around 10 or 11 so I guess we weren’t actually in 7th grade yet — my next-door neighbor, Shirley, and I signed up for it (or rather our parents signed us up).

    The cool thing about it was there was so little pressure, we spent much of the early classes just kicking across the pool using paddle float-boards, back and forth; then, occasionally the teacher would suggest we hold onto the side of the pool, lie on our backs, relax, and just “let go” to float.

    One day, it worked, and it was so easy, I was ecstatic.

    Shirley never did learn, however — but the nice thing about that class was the low-pressure approach. Kids, like me, who were pretty highly motivated (but still nervous and, in my case, were coming from an earlier bad experience) seemed to be more comfortable in that environment.

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  24. My father taught my brother and me to swim. We had season passes to the county pool for one summer. I did not learn proper strokes but could swim under water, breast stroke, on my back, and float. I even jumped from the high dive a few times holding my arms out (Ouch) so I would not go down far. I was afraid I would not bring myself up from the deep quickly enough. I remember my fear while walking out on the high dive. As I walked I was thinking I could fall off this thing, and then I realized, Oh, I have to jump off this thing. I was so in the moment with each step. My mother never learned to swim and I don’t think I ever saw her in a bathing suit.

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  25. This morning I was transferring ground French coffee from the large Sam’s warehouse bag into a smaller bag I use every day. I spilled a small amount on my jeans near my knees. I brushed most of it off but it left a few brownish residue spots. Miss Bosley has taken a liking to those spots. I hope the residue is not enough to hurt her😳 I know I have to keep her from smelling my morning cup, but I thought it was only curiosity driving her nose. Maybe she really would drink it!?!?

    Like

  26. The header photo needs no introduction, a cardinal in snow.

    One of my first “bird” memories is of a cardinal. It was perched on our back fence and I asked Mom what kind of bird it was, since it was so pretty. That was the only cardinal I ever saw in Phoenix, because it’s not really in their range, but after that sighting, I often colored a cardinal at the top or bottom of a school paper.

    In Chicago I saw an occasional cardinal, once a year or less. In Nashville my first winter a flock of six or eight males often came to my yard, and several years I saw a male feeding its baby in my yard. But overall I didn’t see them frequently.

    When we were getting ready to move down here, I saw a cardinal on someone’s bird feeder and looked around the neighborhood and thought, This is perfect cardinal territory. They nest three to twelve feet off the ground–in shrubbery more than in trees–but their chances of a nest being undiscovered by neighborhood cats is low in an area where the only shrubs are an occasional hedge. Here we have a lot of natural undergrowth and lots of wildflowers that offer food for birds (seeds and caterpillars). So it couldn’t be a better spot for cardinals. Indiana is one of seven states, all contiguous, with the cardinal as its state bird.

    If I take a two-hour walk, it’s almost certain I will see several cardinals. I’ve had times when I’ve had 10 or 12 cardinal sightings in half a mile. In spring when they start setting up territories, when one male sings two other males may come to attack him, and off to the side sometimes two or three females are chasing each other. The area is perfect for cardinals . . . but that also means we’re saturated with cardinals. It’s hard to make room for the new offspring!

    And that means that when I go out for a walk in winter, I can specifically look for cardinals to get a photo of cardinals in snow, as I did on the day I photographed the header. I got several cardinals that day, but this one is my favorite–all that fluffy snow and a splash of bright red.

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  27. Our church has ‘age appropriate’ packages available for children if the parents want to grab one in the foyer. The older children have sermon notes where they can fill in the blank while listening and drawing/colouring. Some parents chose this option, others don’t.

    I remember ‘driving’ a pair of my mom’s nail clippers over everything I could reach – she had given them to me to help keep me still during the service. I also loved smoothing the fur trim of her coat over and over again 🙂

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  28. Chas, have you been out for a walk yet? I will be checking the weather where you are. Time for you to gain some weight, my friend. You can drive to a nearby place in the middle of the day to get takeout. I am sure that you have some favorites. I know you didn’t do a lot of things because it was too difficult with your sweet wife. I think a slow walk on your flat street would be good. What do you think? Not sure about the weather and snow there, but I will be looking it up. 🙂

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  29. Thanks for the concern Jo. I haven’t been taking care of myself, I’ll admit. I need to take your advice. Can’t walk far but I need to get out some.
    I’m eating farely regular. a lady comes in three days a week and leaves a couple of dishes for me.
    But it likely isn’t enough.
    I just filled up at dinner. But I’m not sure potatoes and wieners is what I should have.

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  30. Eat what you like, but explore take out in your area. In my small town there were wonderful take out menus. I don’t think I ever got anything, oh, my friends did, they had a favorite restaurant. My last morning there, after my covid test and getting the negative results, I took my self out to eat at IHOP. It was so nice to have a good breakfast and just rest a bit in the midst of all the packing and such.

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  31. Today i was able to watch the PBS show about Nancy Zieman who had a sewing show. I met Nancy when she attended church with us. She offered some sewing classes at a local mall in one of the stores. One was on fitting patterns and I used her advice to use the same pattern for my daughters and only adding length. She probably saved me a lot of money with just that trick. One of the guests on her show lives in a small town near here. Her name is Mary Maluri and she also has had some classes. She also has many patterns and pattern books she has written. The program about Nancy features her and many others who are family, friends and co-workers of Nancy to tell her story. She passed away a couple of years ago.

    Nancy experienced Bell’s Palsy when she was 14 months old. Half her face was paralyzed, yet she did television shows for more than 30 years. As she was relating the difficulty of going to school and being on television with her paralysis, I thought of you, Kizzie. I did not think too much about when I saw Nancy at the time. She always just seemed so confident. She was really just starting her business, but I had no idea of that either. I think we so often miss the pain and fears in others. She trusted the Lord through a whole lot of pain. She suffered from cancer later in her life, but did the show until she just couldn’t. The show remains on PBS with reruns right now. I don’t know if any of you have ever watched her show, which was on Saturday mornings.

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  32. Our church is cancelled for tomorrow due to Covid. We had already decided we would not go, since I know someone who tested positive. A couple of others who sing were quarantined, as well. I think it was the prudent thing to do.

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  33. Maeve Binchy. I had forgotten about her.
    Note taking? I take notes all the time. I have notebook after notebook full. I take notes when I am in a class and when I am talking to someone about something important. I may scan through them later if it’s something I really need to know or am being tested on but o never “study” them. It’s how I process information.

    Swimming. I am not a strong swimmer. My mother was terrified of water and I wasn’t even allowed in the bathtub as a child. My dad was good enough that the Navy wanted to send him to the Naval Academy based on some test scores and his swimming ability. He said he was too ignorant to know what he was being offered.
    I never had swim lessons. I was just in the water with various aunts Once at a Shriners convention my dad stood on the side of the pool and TOLD me how to swim while some man on the pool was helping me learn to swim. Then someone thought it would be funny to sneak up behind him and push him in the pool. That did not end well although I thought it was funny too.

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  34. I hadn’t read one of her books for years, either, Kim. I like her characters and how they all fit into whatever story she is weaving. i happen to see this one for a good sale price for my Kindle.

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  35. Kathaleena – I have been asked by doctors if I have Bell’s Palsy.

    Bell’s Palsy usually goes away after a while, but with some people it is permanent. Good for her for doing all that she did, including being on TV!

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  36. It’s sad that any little difference can get one picked on or outright bullied.

    There is a vast spectrum of how Moebius Syndrome affects different people. Some have full lip closure, while others don’t (and the degree of how much the lips and mouth are open varies). Some have full facial paralysis, while others have it on one side. As for me, I think you all know that it affects the right side of my face more than the left, and I do not have lip closure. 😦 Some folks with Moebius look very, very different, while others are barely affected and are still pretty or good-looking, but with just a slight “difference” to their appearance.

    What amazes me is that even those who are barely affected will write about how much they have been picked on and teased. Anything outside the realm of the norm, even just a smidgen, is enough to make one a target.

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  37. We’re expected to get into the sixties today. Winter 2019-20 was mild and my husband kept track of how many months in a row (more than a year) we had months in which we reached 60 degrees or more. January broke the string, but February is getting one in. We almost made it this week, making it to 59 on Thursday, but today it gets to “try again.”

    Since we’ve had several Covid cases at church this week (nearly our first in this whole pandemic), they have gone back to earlier levels of how everything is conducted. No Sunday school or nursery today, staying in family groups for the service, cleaning after the service, and fellowshing outside . . . but the 60-degree weather is coming with a price, rain!

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  38. This may be our last week of no in house service due to Covid. After last week’s topic, it will be interesting to see if this week’s carries on a similar theme. These are difficult times for pastors. I just want straight preaching from the word.

    I heard we are suppose to hit 80° today. Maybe the Birthday Tree will have blooms after all for Art’s special day. Everything else has been late in blooming because of the cold snap, but the warm weather may put buds on double time toward turning into blooms.

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  39. Morning! Cold start to the day and we are supposed to hit 30 by this afternoon! The deer kept setting off the property alarm during the night and they are out there this morning looking for food. They are chewing the low branches of the pines and munching on snow…their coats are full and fluffy…these are the yearlings meandering about…very curious little critters they are.

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  40. Good morning. What was for lunch today, Chas? Looking forward to hearing about your afternoon walk. Nothing big. Just a little movement. You will feel better, and maybe build up that appetite a bit.

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  41. Went to church in Virginia this morning, excellent sermon as always.

    This is eternal life, that they may know you the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. Jn 17:3

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  42. Janice – What was your concern about last week’s sermon? I know you mentioned it, but I’ve forgotten exactly what you said.

    Like

  43. On Rants & Raves, I said that Chickadee is still “incommunicado”. My fear is that she is in a deeper depression.

    When she hadn’t replied to our invitations for a Valentine’s Day dinner, or to Nightingale’s suggestion that she come over and “babysit” me for a couple days after I got out of the hospital (which I didn’t need after all), my thought was to try to set up a different day for a visit, because getting together once a month is our habit, and usually, if one day won’t work, we agree on another. But Nightingale thought that that would be “pushing”. She said the same thing when I pointed out that we would be going right by the McK’s apartment house on our way to and from my appointment with the surgeon and maybe could stop by briefly to drop off her Valentine chocolates.

    (Interestingly, or strangely, in the almost seven years that Chickadee has lived with them, we have never been inside the apartment, not even at the door. When Nightingale picks her up, she texts her that she is there, and Chickadee comes out.)

    I do understand Nightingale’s position. On one hand, pushing Chickadee to get together with us if she is not up to it or interested would merely push her further away. But on the other hand, I feel like not making any contact is causing her to “float away” from us even more.

    Wisdom needed, for both Nightingale and me.

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  44. I’m going to aim for a return to indoor, in-person church next week. It’s going to be a little strange feeling; some of our congregation have shrugged off the issue of the virus and have been going all along, some have become sick, but have recovered. The rest of us have been more conservative in our approach and have been either lives-streaming or going to the outdoor service at our sister church from time to time (but they also had the virus sweep through that group as well).

    Our sermon today is on 2nd Peter as we make our way toward the end of the NT and our whole-Bible survey (a book a week).

    Chas, so glad you got to church, it must feel good for you to be back. What was the sermon on?

    My dogs are loving their new orthopedic beds and (I think) enjoying their new haircuts and being so clean and un-mangey looking. I was thinking Cowboy was gaining weight but no, it was just a heavy undercoat. He’s thin again (not too thin) and his face looks brighter. Best dogs ever.

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  45. Well it looks like my aunt can buy her motorcoach in time to go traveling this summer. It is a VA buyer which is nice. Her first husband was retired military (she was a widow) and my uncle was retired military. I hope they enjoy the home. There are 5 military bases within a 30 or 40 mile range of Pensacola and you can’t set a VA loan accepted. I’m glad she was willing to accept one.

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  46. Kizzie, last week’s sermon was about Judas being on the wrong side of history and it worked up to the Southern Baptist being on the wrong side of history because of its beginnings with those who were slave owners being able to become missionaries. That was what caused the breakup of the Baptists. It was a different kind of sermon which felt worrisome to me. It did not have as much scripture used as is typical. The sermon today was about the outcast that Jesus ministered to, and leaving the flock to go out and seek the lost.

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  47. Ditto Mumsee’s comment,Kim.
    I didn’t take a walk, I tried to take a nap but couldn’t go to sleep. So” I’m sitting at the computer.

    She only sat in the big chair. She didn’t contribute anything to the social atmosphere around here. She was just here. That’s all.
    But i miss her something awful. I really do miss her

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  48. You should. Two people torn asunder is painful. But she is safe and she is happy and you arranged for her last days (of the past couple of years especially) to be as comfortable and easy as possible. Rest. I am glad you got out this morning. That is enough for today.

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  49. Chas – In my own way, I understand, as well as I can. Sundays are often hard for me, as it was a day when Hubby and I would be hanging out for the whole day together. Today, I am watching a movie, as is my habit for a Sunday afternoon (and was our habit to do so together when Hubby was here), and it has turned out to be the kind of movie that Hubby would have very much enjoyed, which has had me crying a couple times.

    (Btw, as I think I said another time, I hesitate to mention my own situation now because I don’t want to turn the attention to me. But it also seems natural to express an understanding of what it is like to be without our beloved spouses.)

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  50. Janice – Were you more comfortable with today’s sermon?

    Your pastor may have preached last week’s sermon because of the controversy going on right now in the SBC. Maybe he wanted his congregation to have more of an understanding of the history? Just a thought, since I don’t know him or your church.

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  51. Chas I am glad you are here. We pray for you continually and ask our Lord to comfort you ♥️

    This has been a very chilly day…23 degrees with wind blowing making it feel oh so much
    colder…an indoors day for me!

    I worked out on the elliptical then darned some socks for the husband. I am working on a stitching project while watching “The Untouchables”. My Dad loved that show….

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  52. Karen, don’t hesitate to mention our situation.
    That’s what we are here for.
    As for me? It had to happen. Both can’t go out at once. It almost never happens that way outside of tragedy. It works better this way. Jesus said there is no marriage in Heaven. I understand, but I do hope we know each other.

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  53. Hi Chas, I understand that church was enough for today. I just want you to get used to going outside again. You have being caring for your sweet wife for so long and always had to think about what she could do. Now you have to find a new way. Going outside helps me to praise Him for what I see. and I love to hear the birds singing.

    Grateful for an unexpected holiday today.

    Liked by 2 people

  54. Oops, did not mean to hit that arrow!
    The sermon last week seemed connected to the controversy. It did sort of leave us hanging without the ‘But God . . . ‘
    I think Debra made the point that since Judas hung himself did that mean Southern Baptists should also? It is all something to wait and see what happens, just another thing to add to the big jumble and sifting, sorting, and shaking of life now. It is almost time for my Sunday prayer call which is pretty much devoted to praying for our church and other churches across the globe. Timely♡

    Liked by 1 person

  55. I need to get outside, too. But it’s still really cold here. I’m hoping it will be warmer when I go back to help with the twins and I’ll be able to take them for long walks. The fresh air will do them good!

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  56. We had a good sermon today that touched on the danger of heresy within the church.

    Atheists aren’t really a significant antagonist. It’s the false teachers who make their way inside the church to teach and to influence who are the much more dangerous foe.

    Our minds go first to the slick televangelists who influence so many on the airwaves, but the danger is there for all churches.

    Liked by 2 people

  57. Indeed. I am just in from building snowmen so you know it is warm here. I booted thirteen and fourteen out to do chores while I was doing mine and building snowmen. They did chores, they did not build snowmen. I have dealt with many children. Very few have refused to build snowmen but I got several of them. That is okay, they have other qualities.

    Liked by 2 people

  58. I made the best salmon patties tonight. I don’t measure what I put in them so they are always a little different each time. I used canned salmon, 2 eggs, some plain yogurt, oatmeal, rosemary, basil, celery seed, dill seed, black pepper, and turmeric. Sauteed them in extra light olive oil.

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  59. I enjoyed a phone call with Wesley this evening. He had baked some sour dough bread that did not rise as much as he had hoped for. He said the starter was not happy with him since he had neglected feeding it as much as he should have this past week. I have never made sour dough but I have made something similar that was a sweet friendship bread.

    Liked by 1 person

  60. We watched NCIS tonight. A previous show had a nursing mother, a lady Muslim USA agent, and a woman Fire Chief who looked like she might be an LGBT lady. It was like the producers decided they needed to meet a quota of people groups they represent on their show.

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  61. I also found a good one of me by a gal who took lots of pictures of the book parade. I spent time today going through all her pictures and found both of them

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  62. I have this country song going through my head for a couple of days. “Alone In This World Without You”
    Jo could have that in another context.
    But I still have that. I reach over to grab. It’s a reflex. I don’t think about it until I find nobody there.

    Liked by 2 people

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