82 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 1-23-21

  1. King survived heart attack, stroke and lung cancer in recent years, but earlier this month, it was announced he had been hospitalized due to COVID-19. COVID has surpassed cancer, heart attack, and stroke to become the leading cause of death in this past year.

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  2. And Hank Aaron died. A baseball legend and a really big deal here in Atlanta. A person who worked in our office used to drive a used car that was originally owned by Hank Aaron.

    I am trying to order funeral flowers but no one answered my call. I can’t stay on hold forever. Now it is time to get ready for prayer walking. I suppose the floral industry is quite busy these days.

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  3. Good Morning! That is a nice photo up there…not certain what it is but that in flight moment is oh so graceful!
    Something prowling around outside has Lu uneasy…but she is staying put on the front porch 😊
    Larry King was easy to listen to and had an easy way about him. Of course my first thought when hearing of someone’s passing is …I pray they knew our Lord….He knows… ♥️

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  4. Good morning.

    I am thinking the pic is either a heron or a sparrow.

    Pretty active over on yesterday’s thread over night. You people could have stopped by and held a baby or two.

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  5. Larry King never publicly professed to knowing the Lord, although we never know what happened at the end of his life. I hope he did come to a saving knowledge of Christ. He certainly had the opportunity.

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  6. When ordering flowers I usually do a Google search of the local florists, then choose one near my friend’s home.

    The florist’s Internet site will usually tell me all I need to know. Sometimes I just do it all on the site.

    But I like to buy local.

    I usually call, tell them why I’m ordering flowers, give them a financial limit, and let them choose what to put in.

    It’s worked well so far.

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  7. I’m “attending” a conference this weekend via Zoom on “Healing Generational Trauma.”

    Sobering stats last night:

    Dr. Shannea Anderson, trauma specialist, Thousand Oaks, peer-reviewed studies reported:

    25% of the US population ages 18-24 was suicidal in June 2020.

    In April 2020, looking over the previous 30 days (the beginning of the lockdown):

    70% of Americans were reporting moderate stress
    27% reported severe stress

    The total suicide and child abuse data is hidden.

    The only people in the US who are thriving during the shelter-in-place were those who went to church each week. Their suicide rate is 6xs lower than the rest of the country.

    Okay, it is a Christian conference, but the stats were really disquieting.

    They are particularly concerned about the child abuse because it carries life-long implications. Children are only showing up in the ER when it’s so bad they need medical care. What is happening at home that no one is seeing?

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  8. Michelle, the population 18-24 already, before the pandemic, had high rates of mental health issues – there had been article after article on the astronomical rates of poor mental health in that age group. The pandemic did not create that problem.

    Total statistics on child abuse are always hidden. My experience in West Africa taught me very strongly that when societies do not have the resources to be able to detect and remove children from abusive situations the lack of statistics on child abuse does not mean child abuse doesn’t happen. Rather, it means it is happening unchecked. There was nothing I could do for the children I saw suffering, because there was no system in place to be able to trigger to address it. Conservatives in the West are often very protective of parental rights, and very resentful of state interference in child care. The reason child abuse goes underreported right now is because schools and daycares are closed, yet how often have teachers been portrayed as snitches for the left? How many times in my youth did I hear the horror stories of the parents who had their children roved for disciplining their children physically? How often did I hear the lament that the government was interfering too much with the family? It turned out, as I discovered only yesterday, that one such family that was reported on here in Ontario that had their children temporarily removed for corporal disciplind, were membership of a cult that among other things, pressures its members to not seek medical care – but when the story was reported in my youth, they were portrayed as Christians and martyrs by conservative media. When I grew up, I read story after story of adults who survived to tell the torment they suffered at their parents’ or guardians’ hands, and the worst thing to them was the adults who knew about it but did nothing. The dilemma has always been there. If the state interferes, they risk encroaching on parental perogative, if they don’t interfere, they risk leaving children to be tormented. The pandemic has only made plain what has always been there.

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  9. Chas, yes, they did have generational trauma in your day, and no people did not just move on. I have seen it in my own extended family. My great uncle was just a couple of years older than you, and he didn’t talk about the terrible beatings his father inflicted on him until near the end of his life. My grandmother told him on her deathbed that she and their mother had both witnessed the beatings and felt terrible about them but couldn’t do anything to stop them. Just because something is not acknowledged, does not mean it was not a problem. Too much got swept under the carpet then. See my post above about child abuse still existing even where it is not reported.

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  10. Michelle, re child abuse: I wouldn’t be surprised if numbers are up a bit in 2020, since it was a stressful year for most people, and people were together more than usual.

    However, I admit I’m a bit uncomfortable with the discussion, and this is why: Too easily it becomes a conversation about how keeping kids out of school is bad for their mental health and dangerous for their bodies (child abuse). And I’m quite uncomfortable with the concept that children are better off in school under the care of “professionals” than in their homes with their parents and families–and that parents need the eyes of government (schoolteachers and others) to make sure they aren’t abusing their children.

    It also assumes that children are worse off overall, and my hunch is that isn’t true. Families have more time together right now. And while child abuse numbers might well go up with the extra togetherness, other numbers might have gone down. Bullying, for instance, almost certainly has had a downward turn. Child molestation numbers are likely down too (though live-in boyfriends are responsible for a huge percentage of such numbers, so it’s possible the numbers haven’t declined).

    BTW, I had heard that suicide levels were expected to rise but that the numbers showed they didn’t . . . don’t know if that’s true or not.

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  11. Roscuro and I cross-posted, on opposite “sides” of the discussion, but not necessarily a case where one is right and the other is wrong. BTW, I definitely do believe in communities holding parents accountable for how they treat their children. I just am discinclined to believe that most public schools are saviors of their community’s children.

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  12. Cheryl, Q.E.D.

    The problem with prioritizing parental rights is that parents, like those who are government positions, are sinners. Thus, there needs to be always a balance. Make parental rights paramount and you get the situations seen in the Middle East and Central Asia, where parents see their rights as comprehending life and death over a child who dishonours them, even in defiance of modern day laws forbidding such honour killings. Make government rights paramount and everyone knows the consequences of that. But in order to achieve that balance the problems must be dragged out into the open and talked about.

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  13. It’s a rainy morning in the port of los angeles. Finally.

    I was sorry to hear about Larry King, had heard a week or so ago that he’d been hospitalized with Covid; I remembered he’s had a heart issue and perhaps other serious conditions (I’d forgotten about the cancer). All coupled with his age of 87, getting Covid would have been serious, indeed.

    I was lying in bed reading (on the iPad) late last night when in the glow of the e-reader screen I saw a long-legged spider walking across my stomach. I whacked away at it, almost hurting myself. I must have gotten him. Right? I’ve noticed a couple spiders in the house lately, in the bathroom specifically, nothing scary, just the usual garden-variety types that I always assume are beneficial for killing other things like mosquitoes (even though it’s not mosquito weather yet).

    I have a couple cards to get out, one to the woman whose name I drew for our ‘outreach’ assignments at church. She and her husband have had Covid but were recovering at home. Maybe I should send a little cheerful bouquet? Michelle inspired me with all her tips for ordering those.

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  14. Roscuro, the problem with NOT prioritizing parental rights is that God gave parents responsibility for their own children. Community responsibility is, and must be, secondary.

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  15. Called a dog park friend, a couple from church and FB msgd back and forth with my friend in the Valley. And I broke down some empty amazon boxes, I still have a big chewy.com box on the front porch I need to unpack (dog and cat food) and break down.

    I should probably check in with my cousin today, too — and I need to go to the pharmacy to pick up a prescription, so I can ask them about the vaccine availability plans. I do need the 2nd of the shingles vaccine so I may just get that when I’m there today.

    Another couple in our church have tested positive for Covid, they’ve been going to the “looser” service where masks are “optional.” Sounds like there are some ramifications from that starting to spread now. 😦 Our pastor also got the virus, but is back in the pulpit now. I never understood the church doing a “mask-optional” service, but they also offered a mask-mandatory service earlier in the morning. I think since our elders were so deeply split on the matter, they decided to try to provide options for everyone. It always seemed really unwise to me, though.

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  16. I was never able to order flowers in that town. My brother was in the office today so I thought he might have better luck ordering through the office. He has traveled a lot in his former work as a pharmaceutical sales person so he found a small shop in a nearby town that gave personal attention. Her charge was a lot less and it seems that she is Christian. I am glad to give her the business. She does home decor and florist work.

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  17. And my elder texted me, he’s going to be taking a yearlong sabbatical from the elder board but will still be involved and present in church, of course.

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  18. A friend brought me a salad from a chain called Newks. It was really good. I wonder if they are in other locations in the states? I had never heard of them. Since I am not out and about much there is a lot around us that I know nothing about.

    The prayer walk was pleasant this a.m. although it was pretty chilly. I had on a pair of thick jeans with a knit sport hoodie with a cotton fleece hoodie over that and finally a fleece vest over those two layers. I did stay warm!😀

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  19. I just returned from a brisk 4 mile walk alone….I do believe I needed to be alone…with the Lord. Neighbor didn’t respond to my text about taking a walk so off I went. I did make the mistake of topping off my walk with a loop around the park…deep icy drifts on the east part of the park…that was a work out! 🏃‍♀️
    Janice I grew up eating deviled ham. Horning’s Meat Market down the street made the best deviled ham and my Mom was more than pleased to purchase something her little girls would eat! 😊

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  20. My knee is bothering me again today, just back from the grocery store which was crowded. Shopping was a chore with the knee hurting more again.

    I may need to get another one of those shots and then revisit getting back into Physical Therapy again if my insurance will cover it.

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  21. Dj did they have you wear a knee brace? My sister has had two surgeries on her knee and is looking to have a third…such a pesky injury. But she does say that when she puts the brace on at least she can walk a bit better….her’s was the meniscus..and she tore it once again chasing her dog!……. hoping your knee feels better…elevate and ice?

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  22. Agreed, Roscuro, 2:57. But you hear people talk about such things as that people should need a “license” to have a baby, and there’s already a tendency to interview parents before they leave the hospital with their new baby, and so forth. And you also hear people outraged because parents are able to choose to homeschool, or to spank. I have heard people speak as though the government “grants” authority to parents (and they grant too much) . . . as though the children really “belong” to the government and the government can and should decide how they are reared.

    No. The government is in place to punish wrongdoers. That includes punishing people who do wrong to their own flesh and blood. But the government has no authority in a household unless there is good reason to believe a crime has been committed. And yes, unfortunately that means they will sometimes get involved “too late.” That is the nature of living in a fallen world. Watching over households in which crimes have not been committed won’t actually keep children safer, and doing so overreaches government authority.

    Personally I think a community where family and friends come alongside parents who don’t always know what they are doing and who sometimes make the wrong decisions is a better shield around most households. The idea that children need to be “in school” as a way to keep them safe from their parents is dangerous on several levels–one being that it is only a step removed from making it illegal to homeschool. But it also suggests that teachers are more likely to have children’s best interests at heart than parents are, which quite frankly is not true in most situations. Also, we now have had several generations growing up with the whole idea that “strangers” are dangerous . . . do we really want to go down the route of an assumption (in teachers’ minds and then indirectly in children’s minds too) that parents are dangerous?

    Yes, with the assumption of innocence and of loving parents comes some risk. But it seems safer on so many levels than the alternatives, suspicion of parents and a belief the experts are better suited to care for children than their parents are.

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  23. That is Charleston’s King Street. The story is split between Charleston and the town Kim lives in. Since I’ve been to both in the last four years, it was a fun read, though I’m sure it was inaccurate about Kim’s town.

    It always sort of ends that way, doesn’t it?

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  24. I figured out how to listen to the church service here. And then I figured out how to download the powerpoint slides. They even had a list at the beginning of who had returned and I was next to the top. I missed that part of the service as I forgot at first.

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  25. Therapist didn’t want me to wear a brace as it’s important to keep the joint moving as naturally as possible — but he did suggest a knee compression sleeve (to keep swelling down) and I wear that on most days which helps

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  26. Chas, yes it is Charleston’s King Street. My irritation was over how they ate crabs. Ours are more like Maryland crabs than Alaskan King crabs and when A jubilee (not Jubilee- used so many ways in the wrong context) happens it is usually in the early hours of the morning in the hot summertime when there is no oxygen in the water and the fish, crabs, etc fling themselves up on the beach. It only lasts a short amount of time. I have NEVER experienced one.
    Janice, yes Neal’s is all over the place here. I can think of 4 that I can easily go to for lunch.

    Rostropovich and Cheryl, I have mentioned before how the hospital “harassed” Little Miss’ parents about how many wet diapers she had when she was a newborn to the point her mother gave up trying to nurse her and put her on formula. I had made up my mind to go to the next check in with her (her mother died when she was a teenager) and tell them to LEAVE HER ALONE!!! She was and still is an excellent mommy. The only complaint I have with anyone regarding Little Miss is someone had taught her that a trip to the store means she gets a prize. “You buy me that MiMi?” Mickey Mouse shaped ice cream sandwiches cost more than regular ice cream sandwiches 😃 Of course she got them so I am as guilty as the rest of them.

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  27. I have a new Facebook friend! The lady doing the funeral arrangement. It appears this is her new business, from hobby to pro. From a small glimpse through Facebook posts it looks like she may have been a teacher who has ventured into something new so she can stay home and take care of someone. I am so thankful my brother found this person. She is a blessing from God. ♡

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  28. Morning! The pines are covered with freezing fog and there is a low frosty cloud covering the forest this morning…brrrr
    Kim you are the funnest Mimi….oh the memories being made in the heart of that little girl ♥️
    And a sweet connection the Lord has brought to you Janice…I had a similar friend request yesterday from a gal I had been aquatinted with for quite some time. She once worked for my friend who closed her shoppe yesterday and we bumped into each other as we visited friend’s shoppe one last time. This gal once walked with our Lord in relationship but has since fallen away…oh the wonder of what the Lord has ahead of us….

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  29. Those of us who have seen innocent parents have their children stripped naked to be checked for bruises because of someone’ vindictiveness; who have seen teacher’s molest and abuse children, have know children abused by foster parents or shifted numerous times throughout their childhoods for no reason (13 times for a 16 yr. old we knew) are not so trusting of the government’s capabilities in keeping children safe. Yes, thank God for good social workers. There are children who need to be removed. The narrative that Cheryl brings up is dangerous, however, to future families.

    Children belong to the Lord. I do not like to hear the phrase they belong to their parents or to society, as a whole. All of us should be looking out for them as much as possible.

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  30. My mother loved minced ham sandwiches, which seems very close to deviled ham, which I had never heard of. She made her own by grinding the ham up and adding mayo or Miracle Whip and the juice from sweet pickles. Maybe she ground a sweet pickle with it, too. I found it funny when my SIL would buy it from the Deli when my mom went to live there. SIL was not working, but apparently found it difficult to make. I am not sure if the deli version tasted the same or not. I was not a fan myself and dislike sweet pickles. It is always fun to learn about foods around the country or world.

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  31. Cheryl, those ‘people’ you speak of are not the government, are they? Just private citizens airing their opinions. For every horrifying anecdote of state interference there is another horrifying anecdote of people looking the other way and leaving children to be tormented. Anecdotes make bad arguments.

    So, what does the Bible say? The emphasis on parental authority over their children in the modern evangelical church reminds me of another modern evangelical emphasis, that of wifely submission. Both emphasis are made out of fear, the one out of fear of government interference, the other out of fear of feminism. But, it is being pointed out by wiser heads than mine, that the emphasis on wifely submission has been warped out of balance and that there has failed to be an equal emphasis on the simultaneous command that husband must live their wives as Christ lived the Church. Thus, twisted and heretical doctrines such as making the husband High Priest of the home or heretical doctrines such as the Eternal Subordination of the Son have crept in through the fear of man, or, in the case of the evangelical horror of feminism, the fear of women. As Proverbs (29:25) says: “The fear of man is a snare, but the one who trusts in the Lord is protected.”

    Similarly, the fear of government interference in the family has lead to child abuse being covered up in homeschooling families and in churches. There has been an emphasis on parental authority without an equal emphasis on the commands that father’s must not exasperate their children. The New Testament was written under the government of the Roman Empire, and the Roman rule, as Nebuchadnezzar’s vision foretold, was a rule of iron. Yet what do the writers of the New Testament say about how to regard the government? “For rulers are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad. Do you want to be unafraid of the authority? Do what is good, and you will have its approval.” (Romans 13:3) Peter expands on that thought (1st epistle 2:13-17):
    Be subject for the Lord’s sake to every human institution, whether it be to the emperor[c] as supreme, or to governors as sent by him to punish those who do evil and to praise those who do good. For this is the will of God, that by doing good you should put to silence the ignorance of foolish people. Live as people who are free, not using your freedom as a cover-up for evil, but living as servants of God.”

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  32. I asked my pharmacist — I was there yesterday to pick up a prescription — about the vaccine availability there. She just said they expect to have it “in the coming months” (that plural form of month wasn’t encouraging, but I realize she was being careful and only knows so much herself). She was the pharmacy would get the word out widely, regular customers would receive emails. She did say her parents went to one of the drive-up mass sites, but she said most folks really do want to get the vaccine “locally.” My concerns about the drive-up sites is how it can be assured that the appropriate followup shot would be available in a time frame that’s appropriate. Then it’s a second trip out there …

    The closest place to me would be the Forum in my old hometown. But for now, I guess I’ll wait it out a bit longer, hopefully the process will become more streamlined (and more locally available) in the coming weeks.

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  33. The modern church has used its freedom to cover up the evil of child abuse, so we should not be surprised if the authorities are now suspicious of the church. The church had been warned from the beginning not to do that. Peter goes on throughout the epistle to emphasize that it is not persecution if you are being punished for doing wrong and if you are doing right and being persecuted then you should rejoice, in which saying he is merely echoing the words of his Lord and ours. Jesus was unequivocal that those with earthly power were not the ones to be feared: “Don’t fear those who kill the body but are not able to kill the soul; rather, fear Him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell” (Matthew 10:48). How often has the fear of government interference lead modern Christians to hide things, to essentially lie, to turn a blind eye to crimes against the vulnerable? The encouragement in the modern church, which I have been raised in since a child, to fear above all things the interference of government in our lives is a fear that God’s word commands us not to have.

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  34. Roscuro and Cheryl – I haven’t caught up with the rest of the comments, but I want to share this article that I saw recently. The headline refers to “helicopter parenting” but is really about others being the helicopter, and parents being arrested, or children getting in trouble, for things they shouldn’t have been arrested or in trouble for. Pretty disturbing.

    To be clear, I’m not sharing this to say that our governing authorities should completely stay out of parents’ and children’s lives, but to show how crazy things are right now. It’s very sad for these families.

    https://reason.com/2020/12/31/the-10-worst-helicopter-parenting-hysterias-of-2020/

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  35. Heb. 11:14-16 “A Heavenly Country” is our sermon title today (service is still about an hour away, ‘virtually’).

    We’re getting close to wrapping up our book-a-week survey of the entire Bible designed to help us see Christ in all the Scriptures.

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  36. NancyJill – I used to be a fun Mimi, but not so much these days. I would love to be the grandmother giving my grandson cookies or ice cream whenever I babysit, but I babysit (which I now refer to as childsitting) way too often, and Boy is overweight. I do slip him a treat occasionally, but not too much and not too often.

    (Boy does get “goodies” from his mom, but she is careful about how much and how often. And his dad and other grandparents indulge his too-large appetite with junk food each visit. So the kid is not deprived, that is for sure.)

    When he was little, I spent hours sitting on the floor playing with him with Duplos (the larger Legos for little ones). Before we introduced the Duplos, there was a toy that we gave him on his second Christmas, when he was only a little over a year old, that he loved, and would play with (with me) over and over again. One time, Nightingale had gotten home from work, and he insisted on still playing with Mimi with that toy for a little while. 🙂

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  37. Kizzie, I read the link and I thought some of the concerns raised by it were absurd:

    – A journal article that urges pregnant women not to drink coffee is a threat to parents? What happened to the free exchange of ideas – the researcher had a right to write the article, just as women have a right to consider his advice and accept or reject it. It is not even as if the anti-coffee opinion was the only one the journal printed, as the letters with opposing views demonstrate.

    – An article warning about marijuana edibles being handed out a Halloween is somehow threatening parents’ autonomy? Ever since I was a child there have been cautions issued to parents that not all people who provide candy during Halloween trick or treat are well intentioned. That is the first time I have seen such a warning interpreted as somehow infringing on parental rights.

    – The others are cases of over zealous citizens seeing imaginary problems and triggering the authorities to come and investigate. The authorities have an obligation to investigate reported incidents. When the authorities, namely law enforcement, do overreact, it is an example of the kind of overstepping their bounds that the protests last summer were over. Police reform is something I’m sure everyone could agree on the constant necessity for – John the Baptist certainly could when he told the officers coming to be baptized by him that they shouldn’t threaten anyone with violence and be content with their wages. But the Bible still tells us not to fear them, even though it recognizes where they may be tempted to be corrupt. The fact that in the first century AD, the same concerns existed about law enforcement not overstepping their authority demonstrates that such concerns are not evidence of the world getting pretty crazy now.

    That kind of a link is pretty much designed to stir people up to fear and hostility, contrary to what Christians are supposed to stir one another up to, which is love and good works.

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  38. Kizzie you are making sweet childhood memories for Boy…even though at times he would not believe all of them sweet! 😊
    When my grandkids were little they loved coming to Genny’s house and making cookies, gingerbread houses, playing in the forest, riding bikes, snuggling and reading books at bedtime. That didn’t last nearly long enough. They don’t like coming here anymore…they are busy with school, friends, outside sports activities…we are now an afterthought and I sadly believe they groan when they “have” to visit us. So it goes. I pray one day they will want to see us and visit..and talk about life and the Lord….in His Hands….

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  39. That is one of the sadnesses in my life. My dad is ninety years old. We made the effort every year to pay him a visit while children were growing up, other than the two military overseas assignments, and he came to visit us in Germany, twice. And Greece once. But now, the adoptive children have probably spent more time visiting him now that he is unable to travel than the bio children have. Of course, the adoptive children have also visited us more than the bio children have. Interesting how that goes. They all think family is important and are strong family advocates, but…. Daughter tries to arrange a camping trip with us once a year and that is nice. And we used to go to Boise until the last time that was so sickening. And she tries to get up once a year but with her children getting motion sick and our house full of extras….Oldest has come by here a couple of times but second, we have not seen in around seven years (though husband has stopped in there a few times, both in Kansas and Florida) and youngest we have not seen in closer to ten years and he declined visits from dear old dad when he was in the area. We did see him for a day at a family reunion about eight years ago. I don’t mind them not visiting me, I understand. I do not get them not visiting their grandfather. We always made a point of visiting their great grandma when she was alive, as well.

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  40. Roscuro – I understood the article not to be only about threats to parents, or impinging on their rights, or about parental autonomy, but about how ridiculous some people can be, along with actual threats or impingements.

    You are right that the problem is usually due to overzealous/nosy people getting the authorities involved (which is the craziness I referred to) rather than the authorities going after these people on their own. That was the point, I think, and that once the authorities are involved, justice does not always follow.

    As for the one about coffee, I think the point was that the author of that study (who cherry-picked his data from only 48 studies out of over 1000) was putting more guilt on pregnant women who already have enough to feel guilty about, to push his own anti-caffeine agenda.

    The point about the Halloween one was that that warning was stirring up probably needless fear about something that is highly unlikely to happen.

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  41. Roscuro – And if you thought that I had shared that article to stir up fear and hostility, then I apologize, and regret sharing it. But that was not my personal intent.

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  42. NancyJill and Mumsee – Praying for those relationships to be reconciled and revived. So sorry for the heartache you must feel.

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  43. Kizzie, I am not too worried about it. Just thought it odd. I am in regular contact with all of my bio children. And I understand the busy ness of young lives.

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  44. Kizzie, no I did not think that was your intent in sharing it, rather that it was the intent of those who compiled it. Each of those were individual stories, that happened at different times, in different places, for different reasons, random, scattered events. As historian Carl Trueman said, “History, humanly speaking, is a tale of incompetence and thoughtlessness, not of elaborate and sophisticated cabals.” But compiling those random incidents together, stripping each of their immediate context, makes it look as if some force is working together to strip liberties away. People begin to think there must be something bigger going on than meets the eye and feel a bit fearful, a bit like taking shelter. They became a bit more vulnerable to believing in plots and conspiracies among the powerful.

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  45. Had a little stir at our virtual church service today (which also has members of the congregation attending live). The elder giving the opening prayer prayed that the current resident of the White House ‘not be there long.’ The issue of imprecatory prayer came up later during the Q&A segment. Our pastor said his usual prayer is for the person to be converted – but he said should that not occur, it’s not unbiblical to pray the ruler not be in power for long.

    Some people muttered amen when the prayer was said, but I thought I may have also heard a gasp or two.

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  46. @ 5:35
    I believe that it’s improper to pray personal beliefs in a public prayer. A public prayer in one in which every one in the congregation can say “amen”.
    I wouldn’t pray against anyone in a public prayer.
    Not even Hitler.

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  47. Public prayer is leading in worship of God, not stating political viewpoints. Pray for our enemies, pray for our loved ones, pray for our neighbors. Pray that they would know God and be known by Him.

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  48. The elder praying began by mentioning the issue of abortion, if that helps in context. I’d prefer our pastor’s approach, pray first for conviction and conversion.

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  49. I sent in a small order to our store and they should deliver tomorrow. Of course some of my things they either didn’t have or it wasn’t clear what I wanted. So they called me. But I had a lot of difficulty in understanding the fellow. But I knew that I didn’t want jalapenos in place of olives.

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  50. very quiet and interesting. So my small store order got delivered, but it wasn’t so small. Those three cartons of milk turned into three cases of milk. Wow, I will be giving away some milk when quarantine is over.

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  51. I’m thinking of calling them and seeing if the milk can be returned. I looked at my receipt and that was 100 dollars worth of milk.

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  52. That is quite a lot of milk. They had to think there was something suspicious about the order. Just glad they did not do the jalapenos like that!

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