61 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 5-29-20

  1. Good morning, all. Expecting three of the young men to rendevouz in town this weekend. One is coming up to introduce his girlfriend, one is coming up because he wants to show us his new truck, and one to see the other two. I do not know if the two without the girlfriend will be staying here or not. The one with the girlfriend is staying in his fifth wheel as he knows we won’t let him cohabitate in our house. And he will probably bring his dog and knows we do not care to have his dog chasing our cats and chickens and such. Some of my grown children bring stress, others don’t. Should be interesting whatever.

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  2. Good morning. I hope these Friday funnies bring some mirth to your day.

    English is funny. “Mirth” and “dearth” rhyme though they are spelled differently and bring opposite feelings. (Why doesn’t “dearth” sound like “dear”?)

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  3. The header is, of course, the eastern screech owlet, in the tree with a sibling and a parent. Doesn’t its garment look like wool felt rather than feathers? I was glad this one moved away from its sibling, since initially they were scrunched up next to each other and I couldn’t see the rear one’s face at all, and couldn’t see this one’s much. But then it moved to another branch with its eyes wide open and gave me some good shots. This is my second favorite shot; I got one that shows its claws well, but it’s a vertical shot and I try to send AJ horizontal shots when I can.

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  4. Peter, ‘dearth’ probably did sound like ‘dear’ at one point. That is one way they can reconstruct historical accents, observing how words were spelt. Take the word ‘night’. At one point the ‘ght’ was pronounced. This is still the case with the regional Scots ‘nicht’, the closest modern equivalent to the original pronunciation of ‘night’. The same goes for all those other ‘ght’ words: knight (the beginning ‘k’ was also pronounced), eight, thought, etc. The pronunciation of the words has changed, but not the spelling. The spelling is a time capsule of how English used to sound.

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  5. Such a sweet picture of that little owl. I have only seen one that young partially from it’s home in a tree. So neat to see. Thanks, Cheryl, for sharing your hobby with us.

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  6. Good morning. I went to pick up Art’s medicine at Kroger and at the last minute decided to go into the store. They don’t have arrows directing people one way through the store. They had toilet paper. I put two loaves of toilet paper in the cart and 2 cartons of eggs. A worker came up and said they limit it to one each on those items. They really force more trips to the store like that.

    I heard VP Pence is in Atlanta to speak at a memorial service for Ravi along with a discussion with small business leaders.

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  7. The little province of New Brunswick, population just over 750,000, had been successful in flattening the curve, despite being next to Quebec, which has the worst outbreak in Canada. All 120 cases in New Brunswick had been resolved with no deaths, and the province was starting to reopen, when 6 more cases popped up. They were all traced back to one doctor who had crossed into Quebec and did not self isolate for two weeks upon returning. During the two weeks he should have been isolating, he had contact with at least 150 patients and staff in a community hospital, who are all now being tested: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/health-care-worker-border-campbellton-covid-19-cases-1.5588168

    Infecting my patients has always been my greatest concern, and why I have remained almost entirely at home, except to go to work, since we were shut down in March. Only once have I ventured into town to run errands during this entire time. I think, even if churches can resume services, I will have to stay away in order to keep my patients safe.

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  8. That happened to one of my relatives, married to a doctor. He had to pack up a daughter’s apartment and then drive home, it it was a long calculated decision because they knew he would have to self-quarantine for 2 weeks for her sake.

    He did enjoy a two day drive through “normal” country away from home.

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  9. Hi, just checking in since I haven’t been here in at least a week. All is well, just busy.

    Roscuro, your observations on the words with the silent gh make me wonder if there are some German connections behind the Scottish ones, nacht for night, acht for eight.

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  10. What an adorable animal. Can I have one?

    it’s a day off for me, and I am grateful, I needed it. I slept late, even slept through the cat knocking over a full utensil jar on the kitchen island apparently. It didn’t break so she’s lucky there. She likes to pull out the small whisk as her latest cat-puzzle toy challenge. Guess the whole thing went over while she was attempting that this morning.

    Had a police car next door again late last night as I was going to bed, sounds like the one son needed to be taken to the hospital for effects of intoxication but the officer was telling the family it’s better if they take him. Not sure what happened after that as I was closing up my windows and heading for bed.

    California coronavirus numbers are still not cooperating very much in terms of any kind of steady downturn. Even so, everything’s beginning to open up now — retail, salons, churches — so we’ll see where we are in a couple weeks. Many, from the looks of social media, are fighting the social distancing restrictions, especially face masks, so I have a feeling we’ll find ourselves on a rebound and will have to pull back again. I suppose if the numbers spike it might convince some to be more cooperative. But I’m feeling it’s probably best now to still stay away from doing anything that isn’t absolutely necessary for now.

    I hope our in-person church service this Sunday goes well, it will be interesting to hear how many show up. Our 10-member elder board was evenly divided on the decision, but apparently the choice to begin meeting again on the 31st won out at the last meeting on Wednesday. Personally, I think it’s a little too soon by a few weeks. A number of churches are still holding out for a while longer. I also interviewed the local Reform rabbi who said they’re staying completely ‘virtual’ for the time being, she anticipates most of the High Holy Days in September also will be online only this year. We have an orthodox synagogue in the next town over, not sure what’s going on there – a former editor of ours & now port spokesman goes there, I’ll have to ask him when we talk next.

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  11. Kevin, there are Germanic connections certainly, but the connection precedes modern German by 1500 years. The Angles and the Saxons, who overran Celtic Britain after the Roman departure in the 5th century, were Germanic tribes. Old English (which comes from a vowel shift of the word Angle) was a Germanic language – the Old English epic Beowulf has to be translated for us to understand it. But the infusion of Norman French after William the Conqueror took the English throne in 1066 served to modify the Anglo-Saxon into the Middle English that Chaucer wrote his Canterbury Tales in, which we can still understand especially when it is put into modern spelling. In Chaucer’s day, the ‘ght’ was still pronounced. I have heard performances of the Middle English accent, and it bears a close resemblance to the Scots dialect (the Scottish would tell you there are two native languages in Scotland, Gaelic and Scots – Robert Burns of ‘Auld Lang Syne’ fame wrote in Scots):

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  12. Wesley had to learn to read in Middle English in one of his classes at Baylor. That’s what English PhD bound students do. Fun but how practical? Only for teaching upper level courses or entertainment ♡

    The Ravi Memorial service was excellent with all the presentations of the Gospel. The man who spoke after Ravi’s daughter near the beginning was Vince, the apologist who had been college roommates with a man at my church. It was an Atlanta event that someone at church shared with me. On my 3 p.m. prayer call with my ladies’ group some of the group talked a few moments about it. We spent much more time praying about Minnesota and similar issues along with all the many needs within the group..

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  13. You had one job…..

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/monkeys-steal-samples-covid-19-120029284.html

    “A band of marauding monkeys has attacked a laboratory technician and stolen three Covid-19 test samples, raising fears they will infect themselves and then spread the deadly disease to humans.

    The worker was attacked outside a medical college in Meerut, northern India, while transporting samples from patients suspected of having coronavirus. The monkeys ran off into a residential area.

    The employee is said to have been unharmed, but has angered officials after filming the aftermath of the attack, rather than attempting to retrieve the samples from the fleeing monkeys.”

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  14. Thanks, Janice, it helps to understand the situation a bit better. I had a talk with my Ethiopian son a while back and he expressed concern that he fears the police. That story confirms that the fear appears to be justified. Sadly.

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  15. My sophomore English teacher read us the Lord’s Prayer in Old English once. I wish I could remember it.

    And since the Norman Conquest, our language is more French than German. About 60% of our modern words are of French origin. And those ones we think of as “vulgar”? They’re mostly Anglo-Saxon words, or variations thereof. “Vulgar” just means “common”, the Norman nobility made them “words not suitable for polite conversation.”

    Plus, have you noticed how many foods are different than the animal? “Ox” is Anglo-Saxon, “beef” is based on the French word bœuf. We eat porc, but it comes from swine, etcétera (which is a word from French).

    I love language.

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  16. Peter, one of the language documentaries I watched years ago pointed out that we used the Anglo-Saxon words for the animals and the French word for their meat, as the Saxons were the peasant herders who tended the animals, while the Normans were the nobility who consumed the animals. So much historical information is encoded into language. I love to read books about language, when I can find them – linguistics is never a very large section in a typical library.

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  17. On Janice’s link, one thing that keeps going through my mind is the training I recieved in my first nursing course. We were given crisis prevention training to use with patients who were became violent, learning practical skills such as how to break a chokehold. One of the things we were trained in was safe methods of restraint, and it was burned into my mind that facedown restraints were unsafe and never to be used. I still have the written information:
    “Some restraints are more dangerous than others. For example, facedown (prone) floor restraints and positions in which a person is bent over in such a way that it is difficult to breathe, are extremely dangerous. This includes a seated or kneeling position in which the person being restrained is bent over at the waist and any facedown position on a bed or mat.
    “Restraint-related positional asphyxia occurs when the person being restrained is placed in a position in which he cannot breathe properly and is not able to take in enough oxygen. Death can result from this lack of oxygen and consequent disturbance in the rhythm of the heart.
    “Staff members must be especially careful not to use their own body in ways that restrict the restrained person’s ability to breathe. This includes sitting or lying across a person’s back or stomach. When someone is lying face down, even pressure to the arms and legs can impact that person’s ability to breathe effectively.
    “All of these positions may interfere with a person’s ability to breathe. While they are different, these positions share a common factor. When forcefully maintained, each of them could prevent the diaphragm (the largest muscle if respiration) from working. If the diaphragm is not allowed to move down into the abdomen, breathing is seriously restricted. In fact, when a forcefully maintained position hinders both chest and abdominal movement – the result can be fatal.”
    I took that course 12 years ago. It should be common knowledge by now.

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  18. Roscuro- yes, I know it. You just have a better way of expressing it. The common folks used the common language, the nobility used the French words. So the phrase “Pardon my French” when swearing is rather ironic.

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  19. My husband and I just returned from a walk on one of our local trails, probably three miles and two hours or a little more. And in that time we saw three species of woodpeckers, at least three hawks, a mother wood duck with two babies, a female merganser, a yellow warbler, a cottontail rabbit, a fox squirrel chasing another, a beaver feeding in the water and then collecting plants to take home, a box turtle (my first to see here but my sixth species of turtle here) and a softshell and a painted turtle, two species of swallowtail butterflies, and multiple other more common bird species (including cardinals and red-winged blackbirds and blue jays) and a couple of other butterflies.

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  20. DJ, yes. I have known about it for a while, and see its influence on Youngest in-law, whom I suspect to be familiar with the forums that have hosted it, as he knows how to access the dark web where 8chan is. It has diversities of interpretation of the conspiracies, so not all it’s proponents are necessarily Trump supporteers, for example – YIL certainly is not, but he touts many of the theories of QAnon, including the one about a powerful ring of child abusers. World linked to an long form article by The Atlantic on it last week: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2020/06/qanon-nothing-can-stop-what-is-coming/610567/

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  21. While at Covenant one of the professors noted that Wesley was gifted in linguistics and recommended him for a special summer program that he did not choose to pursue. It would have been interesting to see where that would have led him.

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  22. My daughter called and then brought the youngest two grands over. She got Lucy to sleep and then went to work while I watched them both. Do you know how hard it is to watch active children while you are fasting???

    Kevin, no report on the screaming I heard.

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  23. Thanks roscuro, I saw the Atlantic link also in the piece I saw this afternoon (on Get Religion where Terry Mattingly was discussing in — I don’t think I’d heard of this before).

    Janice, I’m seeing on CNN that Atlanta is seeing some unrest?

    It’s going to be a messy weekend.

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  24. The Atlanta police chief’s words are well taken.

    But I don’t think it will make a difference in the protests.

    I’ve heard a couple comparisons to 1968 today and it’s probably appropriate in some cases. It was a year of upheaval in U.S. culture and politics, I was a teenager at the time and remember it well. It’s disheartening to see that race relations are still so volatile and close to the edge. I suspect understanding this is a “black thing,” if you will, and understood fully only from that first-hand cultural and racial perspective.

    The new video, by the way, indicates that some of the other 3 officers weren’t only watching but actually may have been active participants at some point.

    But even the indictments won’t be enough to quell the unrest.

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  25. Headline: Protesters in Atlanta mount the CNN sign in front of the network headquarters in Atlanta, on Friday, May, 29. WGCL

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  26. Dj that is the first I have ever heard of the “political cult”..and of course it would involve anyone who would support President Trump. Qanon even has a Wikipedia page explaining what is about. After reading it half way down the page I gave up…it’s all so very strange and at times I felt as though the “leader” doth protest too much…. 😳
    So now rioters in Atlanta are protesting CNN?

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  27. I don’t know that they’re protesting CNN, but since the network is headquartered in Atlanta they’re among the central locations.

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  28. A Christian friend was saying it’s time to man the decks of the sinking ships. I suggested organizing a band and rearranging the chairs, just a little bit, here and there — 6 feet apart, anyway.

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  29. yup, I am beginning to wonder when and where I can get a haircut. My gal cut my hair right before all of this happened. But then she was hoping to have a shoulder replacement, I think. So I am not sure if she will be able to open again. I am good at cutting my bangs, but the rest is getting rather long.

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  30. Jo, take free advice for what it’s worth, but when circumstances change, and your need for nourishment changes, it’s probably safer to eat something.

    Liked by 1 person

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