26 thoughts on “News/Politics 5-23-20

  1. ———–

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  2. Rules are for the peons.

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  3. Thank you Capt. Obvious….

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  4. Isolation is taking a toll in SF.

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  5. Candace comes out swinging….

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  6. School is in journalists.

    Pay attention, you might learn something….

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  7. In the county north of us, Mendocino, friends have been concerned about violence. Four women have already been murdered by their husbands/boyfriends. I don’t think there have been any COVID deaths.

    Their rules are now more relaxed than our county’s.

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  8. Thinking of the nine year old autistic child in Florida. His school/ activity place was closed and it was probably very difficult for his mom to deal with him. Killing him was not the answer.

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  9. Suicide and domestic violence do seem to have increased since the Covid shutdown but I wonder if its a lack of imagination or lazy thinking to solely blame a shutdown.

    Suicide is usually an part or a result of a mental illness. The covid shutdown provide a stresser that triggered a suicide. Perhaps if we as a society treated mental illness like a physical illness prior to the shutdown problems would be less or minimal. Finances are a frequent trigger especially among the middle age. With an adequate safety net, a shutdown wouldn’t include a financial trigger. A simple universal basic income would ensure financial stability lessening the mental strain. Don’t blame the shutdown blame the lack of an adequate social safety net.

    Similarly domestic violence victims were already in a harmful situation prior to the context. Why didn’t they leave? Frequently its fear and lack of money. With a knowledge that finances would not be an issue, perhaps they would not have remained in that situation. Again don’t blame the shutdown, blame an inadequate social safety net.

    Instead of sinking money into corporations in the hopes it spurs employment, just give the money directly to the people — they will spend and spur employment; a trickle up effect instead of a trickle down ( which doesn’t work). Further more, with the stability of a single UBI various stop gap highly inefficient programs can be cut saving federal, state and municipal governments admistrations costs. And with the financial stress gone, perhaps health costs will go down.

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  10. Hwesseli, money doesn’t just come from nowhere that you can give some to everyone and all our problems will go away. The USA has rejected socialism on principle, and hopefully will continue to do so. Government largesse (whose money?) isn’t the answer to the problem.

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  11. Most gov’ts currently spend the equivalent of $2000 per person on various programs and administration cost. Why not be more efficient — its not an ideological argument, its actually logical. Not only do we save gov’t money, we promote financial stability which benefits mental health, family dynamics and personal safety.

    Currently, gov’ts spend vast sums of money on corporate subsidies and the military yet rarely does anyone asks where the money comes from? Its far more efficient to give money directly to the people instead of giving money to corporations and hope it trickles down as is currently the case. Its not a question of whether the gov’t has the money, they do — they just choose to spend it corporations not people. [=

    Making a benefit universal is far cheaper, more efficient, and has better results. The US gov’t spends more money per capita on health care than any other country yet does not have universal coverage and has poor results. On a logical basis, universal health care is better — ideology is the only things that prevents the US from enjoying universal health care. Similarly, most gov’ts refuse to consider a UBI because it doesn’t fit the neo-liberal capitalist ideology that dominates economics. In a weak moment my economists friends will admit a UBI makes sense yet they can’t endorse it because….capitalism.

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  12. It’s time to impeach this guy.

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  13. Uhhhh…..

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    “Huh, Jordan D. Haynes, 27, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is described as “a generous young man with a delightful grin.” News reports, however, also describe a Jordan D. Haynes, 27, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, as a murder victim found in his car.

    But was he infected with COVID-19 when he was murdered? Then it counts.”

    https://twitchy.com/brettt-3136/2020/05/23/its-best-to-take-a-closer-look-at-the-new-york-times-front-page-full-of-coronavirus-obituary-snippets/

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    Count it!

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  14. Data collection on the go always has its issues — nursing homes are under counting, Florida and Georgia are probably under counting but they clearly don’t know what they are doing and perhaps they are over counting elsewhere. By any standard 100,000 is a large number of people to die of a disease in less than three months.

    Not sure if this is hypocrisy or just irony. After demanding churches reopen because they provide an essential service, Trump spent the weekend golfing. He obviously doesn’t a believe a word he said; if he truly felt it was essential would he not be in church? People do ignore advice even those who give the advice ignore it. For those of us who live in a winter climate — the first real summer weekend makes it difficult not to go out to nearby parks and beaches.

    Ramadan finished last night. Normally the mosque parking lot would be massive open air potluck/buffet with a children’s activities etc. However, the mosque has been mostly closed for the last three months. Quietest Eid/Ramadan since I moved to the neighbourhood. Islamic prayer is supposed to be communal but they haven’t question the government orders. In some countries, they would adapt by praying in the parking lot but even that’s not happening.

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  15. So Trump was right again.

    The experts?……. Not so much.

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    “Well, I think the 3.4 percent is really a false number,” Trump told Sean Hannity. “Now, and this is just my hunch, and — but based on a lot of conversations with a lot of people that do this. Because a lot of people will have this and it’s very mild. They’ll get better very rapidly. They don’t even see a doctor. They don’t even call a doctor. I think that that number is very high. I think the number, personally, I would say the number is way under 1 percent.”

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    “Several studies have suggested that Trump was right. But, now here’s what the CDC is saying about the fatality rate the coronavirus:

    0-49 years old: .05%
    50-64 years old: .2%
    65+ years old: 1.3%
    Overall ages: .4%”

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  16. Per capita are the only numbers that matter HRW.

    But yet I never hear you saying anything about the others, not even the countries with more than and nearly double the US numbers. But then you do have an agenda, don’t you….?

    Orange Man Bad…..

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/

    (based on population data from The CIA World Factbook).

    Belgium (791.76)
    Spain (573.38)
    UK (558.95)
    Italy (524.58)
    France (415.90)
    Sweden (391.87)
    Netherlands (338.01)
    Ireland (309.86)
    USA (288.74)
    Switzerland (226.80)

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    And when you take out Democrat run NY, which horribly skews the US numbers, the US looks even better.

    Downstate NY (1,771.86)
    Belgium (791.76)
    Spain (573.38)
    UK (558.95)
    Italy (524.58)
    France (415.90)
    Sweden (391.87)
    Netherlands (338.01)
    Ireland (309.86)
    USA sans downstate NY (233.44)

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  17. CBS caught faking the news again….

    Using an image from Ukraine in 2016 to push their Covid 19 story now.

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  18. Without comment.

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/500-doctors-tell-trump-to-end-covid-19-shutdown-warn-it-will-cause-more-deaths

    “500 Doctors Tell Trump To End COVID-19 Shutdown, Warn It Will Cause More Deaths”

    ““We are alarmed at what appears to be the lack of consideration for the future health of our patients. The downstream health effects of deteriorating a level are being massively under-estimated and under-reported. This is an order of magnitude error,” says a letter written by Simone Gold, a California emergency medical specialist, and signed by hundreds of doctors.

    “The millions of casualties of a continued shutdown will be hiding in plain sight, but they will be called alcoholism, homelessness, suicide, heart attack, stroke, or kidney failure,” the letter says. “In youths it will be called financial instability, unemployment, despair, drug addiction, unplanned pregnancies, poverty, and abuse.””

    ““Because the harm is diffuse, there are those that hold it does not exist. We, the undersigned, know otherwise,” the letter concludes.”

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  19. My comment wasn’t about Trump — it was about the limitations of data collection and the realization of +/- 100 people in a death toll over 100 000 is insignificant since 100 000 is a large number to die in only three months. This isn’t a competition — when you are looking at these kind of numbers in only three months, lets forget about per capita etc and agree that this is too many people.

    As for per capita — the higher nations are densely populated with an older population, its only natural their numbers are higher. Similarly the Nordic numbers (and the eastern Europe — less densely populated and younger) are much lower (except Sweden). If you treated the Europe as one country the per capita would be similar to the US.

    In addition, Europe is about a month ahead of the US in terms of the trajectory of the disease, the US per capita death rate has been steadily moving up and passing European countries. Looking at the number of resolved cases and serious cases, its clear most of Europe is near the end stage whereas the US numbers suggests a longer distance to the end. Listing the US below Spain etc also neglects to mention the OECD countries below the US — Canada, Germany, Finland, Norway, Denmark, Austria, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea.

    Removing the NYC from the stats is a nice trick to improve the US stats but the comparison would only work if you removed the hotspot from each nation — Milan from Italy, Brussels from Belgium, Madrid from Spain, London from UK, Amsterdam from Netherlands. I don’t have the data set but I imagine the numbers would change in a similar manner for these countries.

    An interesting thing to observe is that even when NYC is removed from the US stats the US ranking in the death per capita chart doesn’t change. Switzerland is at 220 per million and Canada at 170 per million, Without NYC, the US is still above both at about 235 per million. The hither land can’t blame NYC. Newsweek just reported that Montgomery Alabama no longer has any ICU beds available yet the state insists on reopening — the point of the shutdown was to flatten the curve and not overwhelm the health care system. By opening too early, the health care system may start to show strain even outside NYC.

    After saying lets forget about per capita I wrote four paragraphs on it, I do like numbers…..but lets agree the numbers anyway you write it are not good — for the US, for Canada and many other places — Brazil, India, Russia. Personally, I’m disappointed in the complacency and the talk of reopening in Canada has not been preceded by testing — we need to test more before we do anything else.

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  20. CNN caught editing clips.

    So yeah, more fake news from the worldwide leader.

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  21. From the former president of CBS

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-liberal-leaning-media-has-passed-its-tipping-point-11590430876

    ___________________________
    OPINION COMMENTARY

    The ‘Liberal Leaning’ Media Has Passed Its Tipping Point

    A return to balance would be commercially unviable. The best solution may be an honest embrace of bias.

    By Van Gordon Sauter
    May 25, 2020 2:21 pm ET

    … To many journalists, objectivity, balance and fairness—once the gold standard of reporting—are not mandatory in a divided political era and in a country they believe to be severely flawed. That assumption folds neatly into their assessment of the president. To the journalists, including more than a few Republicans, he is a blatant vulgarian, an incessant prevaricator, and a dangerous leader who should be ousted next January, if not sooner. Much of journalism has become the clarion voice of the “resistance,” dedicated to ousting the president, even though he was legally elected and, according to the polls, enjoys the support of about 44% of likely 2020 voters.

    This poses significant problems not only for Mr. Trump but for the media’s own standing. If Mr. Trump prevails in November, what’s the next act, if any, for journalists and the resistance? They will likely find Mr. Trump more dangerous and offensive in a second term than in the first.

    More important, how will a large segment of the public ever put stock in journalism it considers hostile to the country’s best interests? Unfortunately, dominant media organizations have bonded with another large segment of the public—one that embraces its new approach. Pulling back from anti-Trump activism could prove commercially harmful.

    … The media seems uninterested in these issues of bias. But wouldn’t a softening of its editorial orientation bring new readers or viewers? Probably not. The growth of new customers would be more than offset by the defection of outraged members of the current audience. The news media seems very comfortable with its product and ability to sell it.

    There’s probably no way to seal the gap between the media and a large segment of the public. The media likes what it is doing. Admires it. Celebrates it. There is no personal, professional or financial reason to change. If anything, the gap will expand. Ultimately, the media finds the “deplorables” deplorable. …

    … Journalism affects social cohesion. Convinced of its role and its legitimacy, however, the media doesn’t seem to much care. And the other side can certainly enjoy throwing rotten tomatoes at distant targets. …

    … But America won’t reunite until far more people can look at a news story in print or on the screen and, of all things, believe it.

    Mr. Sauter was president of CBS News, 1982-83 and 1986.

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