36 thoughts on “News/Politics 8-17-19

  1. Here’s what happened.
    There was a guy who had billions of dollars. Nobody knows how he got it but they know that he had it. He and lots of unknown friends had lots of sex orgies. Sometimes with willing participants, but not always. Why a man with that much money and influence should go to illegal measures, I don’t understand. But It appears that he did many times.
    He evidently ran up a large number of illegal charges against himself and would likely involve many well know personalities.
    But he is eventually caught and jailed. Awaiting a significant trial
    He had left a long, evil trail during lis life. It involved lots of people, innocent and guilty. The innocent want some money. The guilty want all of this to go away.
    He is in prison. He has, in the past tried to kill himself. So he was put on “Suicide Watch”.

    But later, he was taken off suicide watch and put into a prison cell.
    He had a cell mate, but he was removed for some reason.
    The cells have constant watch by jailers, but they were working long hours and were not around.
    There are cameras available, but for some reason, none were working.
    He had no belt, or other device to hang about his head except a bed sheet which, I understand, is as strong as paperr towels.
    So? He attached this around his neck and tied the bed sheet to the top bunk and hanged himself.
    In doing so, he broke some bones in his neck that are usually associated with a blow of some sort.

    All these coincidences come together to snuff out a life that lots of important people wanted dead.

    All of this leads us to think that he had some help. But that presents it’s own problems. E.g. How did someone get into his cell without anyone else knowing about it?

    We may never know.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m sure Omar will blame Trump, but this was built by Democrats. Note that CBS does it’s best to excuse Dems for this, and blame racism instead, of course….

    https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2019/08/15/minnesotas-5th-congressional-district-listed-as-worst-di-struct-for-black-americans-to-live/

    “Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District, represented by Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, was listed this week as the worst congressional district in the country for black Americans.

    The financial website 24/7 Wall Street compiled a list of the 30 worst districts for black Americans by using data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Specifically, the list-makers honed in on metrics like median-household income, homeownership, unemployment, poverty, and educational achievement.

    The numbers produce a stark picture of the 5th Congressional District, which encompasses Minneapolis and several surrounding suburbs.”

    ——

    “While the 5th District is represented by Omar, a progressive Democrat freshmen lawmaker, there’s only so much she can do on her own to improve disparities in her district, the authors of the list say. Large-scale improvements take the backing of several lawmakers.”

    ———

    More excuses, just like with Cummings district.

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  3. And speaking of Cumming’s district……

    More progress, but none of it is because of anything Cummings and Democrats are doing.

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  4. Sorry Grandma. She hates Jews more than she loves you.

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  5. Ah yes….

    Moving the goal posts. It’s no longer Russia, Russia, Russia!……. Now it’s Racist, Racist, Racist….

    These new whimpering cries from the left are simply an admission that they’ve got nothing.

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columnists/new-york-times-chief-outlines-coverage-shift-from-trump-russia-to-trump-racism

    “New York Times chief outlines coverage shift: From Trump-Russia to Trump racism”

    “Dean Baquet, the executive editor of the New York Times, said recently that, after the Mueller report, the paper has to shift the focus of its coverage from the Trump-Russia affair to the president’s alleged racism.

    “We built our newsroom to cover one story, and we did it truly well,” Baquet said. “Now we have to regroup, and shift resources and emphasis to take on a different story.”

    Baquet made the remarks at an employee town hall Monday. A recording was leaked to Slate, which published a transcript Thursday.

    In the beginning of the Trump administration, the Times geared up to cover the Russia affair, Baquet explained. “Chapter 1 of the story of Donald Trump, not only for our newsroom but, frankly, for our readers, was: Did Donald Trump have untoward relationships with the Russians, and was there obstruction of justice? That was a really hard story, by the way, let’s not forget that. We set ourselves up to cover that story. I’m going to say it. We won two Pulitzer Prizes covering that story. And I think we covered that story better than anybody else.”

    But then came the Mueller report, with special counsel Robert Mueller failing to establish that the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with Russia to fix the 2016 election. “The day Bob Mueller walked off that witness stand, two things happened,” Baquet continued. “Our readers who want Donald Trump to go away suddenly thought, ‘Holy @#$%, Bob Mueller is not going to do it.’ And Donald Trump got a little emboldened politically, I think. Because, you know, for obvious reasons. And I think that the story changed. A lot of the stuff we’re talking about started to emerge like six or seven weeks ago. We’re a little tiny bit flat-footed. I mean, that’s what happens when a story looks a certain way for two years. Right?”

    Baquet used the gentlest terms possible — “the story changed” — but the fact is, the conspiracy-coordination allegation the Times had devoted itself to pursuing turned out to be false. Beyond that, Democrats on Capitol Hill struggled to press an obstruction case against the president. The Trump-Russia hole came up dry.”

    ——–

    Pulitzers for fake news.

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  6. Crickets…….

    ————

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  7. The press sees nothing.

    —————

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  8. Amash the traitor exposes his true colors.

    ——————

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  9. The enthusiasm is definitely stronger on one side.

    ——————

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  10. Now Biden’s crowd……. of 30 people, got together down the street.

    https://www.eagletribune.com/election/new_hampshire/biden-campaign-holds-rally-down-the-street-from-trump/article_0db9dc34-9feb-50cc-8b66-8c717e76d87c.html

    “While thousands packed the Southern New Hampshire University Arena to hear President Donald Trump speak, about 30 supporters of Joe Biden gathered at the Portland Pie Co. to talk about the former vice president’s campaign.

    Stuffed in a small room with six tables, munching on several types of pizza, campaign members discussed Biden’s qualities with interested voters.

    “We are here because we are standing up to hate just down the road,” announced Biden’s New Hampshire Organizing Director Peter Dougherty, 28, of Manchester. “This is our moment, our chance. We need to talk to people now about what (Joe Biden) can do.”

    High energy and chants of “Go, Joe! Go, Joe!” could be heard throughout the restaurant from supporters and interested voters of all ages.”

    —————

    🙂

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  11. I don’t think the new Racist, Racist, Racist! tactic is working as planned, especially among the targeted audience. 🙂

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/washington-secrets/zogby-poor-performances-of-democrats-boost-trumps-approval-to-51-up-with-blacks-hispanics

    “Zogby: ‘Poor performances’ of Democrats boost Trump’s approval to 51%, up with blacks and Hispanics”

    “President Trump’s approval rating has edged up, driven by long-term confidence in his economy and boosted by the lackluster performances of the two dozen Democrats trying to beat him in the 2020 election, according to the latest Zogby Analytics poll.

    The contrarian survey, provided exclusively to Secrets, pushes back on some other recent polls showing a surge in Trump’s disapproval rating.

    Namely, it found that recent issues portrayed as trouble for Trump haven’t hurt him and that he is growing in support among Africans Americans, Hispanics, independents, and younger voters.”

    ——————-

    Ha! 🙂

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  12. Chas, if there is a drop of at least four feet in a hanging, the weight of the person will fracture their cervical vertebrae when they reach the end of the noose: https://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Hanging. After Epstein’s first attempt, he was found on the floor of his cell with bruises on his neck, which indicates he knew to jump from a height but his noose had not held on that attempt. Sex offender suicide is a common occurrence. One study found that 14% of living sex offenders (meaning the ones who were successful are not part of the statistic) reported attempting suicide before or during incarceration: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1079063212447201?journalCode=saxb

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  13. I believe there were cameras but only to film the hallway — still, those are being reviewed by Epstein’s attorneys to see if they reveal anything interesting.

    For now, barring more evidence to dispute the scenario, it would appear to have been a suicide — allowed to go forward in what was a very poorly run facility, clearly.

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  14. DJ, sleeping on night shift is far more common among institutions than is admitted to the general public. I speak as one who has witnessed it for myself, in places where I have been in clinical training during night shift. It is totally against the rules and to do so does endanger their licenses to practice, but it is done regardless, and because everyone is compelled by intense peer pressure to participate, no one will tell.

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  15. Here’s a piece about resisting conspiracy theories. . .

    “Not only are conspiracies notoriously difficult to execute and maintain over time, but they also often turn out to be non-falsifiable.

    I once spoke with a sincere Christian friend who was convinced the coordinated terrorist attack on 9/11 was a U.S. government-controlled operation. But when I began raising questions, problems, or pointing out what I believed were inconsistencies, he would easily reply, “But that’s what they want you to believe.” In other words, any skepticism or evidence I raised against the conspiracy theory turned out to be part of the conspiracy theory itself. In a sort of diabolical, twisted use of logic, evidence against the conspiracy turned out to be evidence for the conspiracy. In this way, conspiracy theories are often presented by adherents as non-falsifiable. You can’t prove them wrong. But if you can’t prove them wrong, how do you prove them right? It seems you either buy into the theory wholesale or you don’t. In questioning the theory, it only shows you have been blinded, hornswoggled, and taken in by the media and government propaganda.

    This kind of reasoning undermines rational thought, our intellectual obligation to weigh evidence, and, in the end, our ability to think critically. As a Christian, if you sincerely believe in these outlandish conspiracies, you are undermining your witness for Christ, undercutting your own case for the resurrection and giving people a reason not to listen.”

    https://www.str.org/blog/why-you-should-resist-conspiracy-theories#.XVgvtehKiM_

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  16. Aj

    The NYT is simply embracing capitalism. Now that the Mueller report has come and gone and the narrative has become tired, the NYT needs a new story line to gey its target demographic to read and buy. I’m sure FOX has had similar discussions….thd Birther story is dying lets try Obam is a Muslim, that should keep the eyeballs on the screen. Its free market capitalism at its finest…..creating a product people will buy.

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  17. DCI – P stands for Defence of Children International – Palestine. It does receive support from the PFLP.

    PFLP withdrew from the PLO in 2015 due to a lack of elections. Its famous for 1970s hijacking and later used suicide bombers, it longer uses either. Unlike Fatah, it does not recognize Israel and favours a one state solution and unlike Hamas its a far left secular party. Most its founders were Arab Christians and it continues to receive most of its suppprt and popularity from the Christian minority winning municipal elections in the Bethlehem area.

    They are considered a terrorist organization by the West (most Palestinian political parties are) but have been relatively quiet instead focusing on rebuilding grassroots support in the West Bank. Given the choice of political groups in the West Bank and Gaza, its interesting the ladies choose to work with a secular group with Christian ties. At least their opponents can’t say they are hanging out with Islamic terror groups. Further evidence to my contention that theu are the Muslim moderates conservatives keeping demanding to step up and lead the Muslim community.

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  18. As to the Obama birther story, as I explained to friends who lived with me in Hawai’i, in 1961, Hawai’i was an expensive 8-10 hour flight by prop plane to California.

    At the time we lived in Hawai’i, and I presume now, Honolulu was where the entire Pacific Islands came for medical care. It was a long way away from anything.

    Assuming Obama was born in Kenya, how would his mother have gotten there? And who would have paid for it?

    The story makes no sense.

    Does anyone really think her parents, who were not wealthy, would have paid to send their daughter half the world away to give birth when the finest hospital within thousands of miles was less than a mile from their home?

    When they, who lived in Hawai’i 35 years later, sat back and thought about it, they had to agree it made no sense.

    Let it go.

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  19. Further to HRW’s observations on the PLFP, whose founder, George Habash, was a Palestinian Christian, it was the Palestinian Christian population who were among the first organizers of opposition to Jewish settlement in Israel during the time of the British Mandate. They edited the leading publication, Filistin, against the British occupation and Jewish resettlement, while the Palestinian Christian Matiel Mogannam was a co-founder of the Palestinian nationalist organization, The Arab Women’s Association. Lest it seem surprising that the PLFP should be involved in terrorist activities in the 1970s, do not forget that Sirhan Sirhan, the assassin of Robert Kennedy, was by birth, a Palestinian Christian. The Palestinian-Israeli conflict is more complex than Muslim vs. Jew.

    There is no doubt that anti-Semitic propaganda is a problem among Palestinians. As my Middle Eastern History professor pointed out, the Palestinian anti-Jewish rhetoric is mainly resurrected European anti-Semitic conspiracy theories – Mein Kampf and The Protocols of the Elders of Zion were books he saw for sale in Palestinian bookstores. As I have observed in connection to the Poway and Pittsburgh synagogue shootings, that same kind of resurrection of anti-Semitic conspiracy theorizing is found also among white supremacist nationalist groups in the West who claim to be Christian, such as the Christian Identity movement, which has a history of committing anti-Semitic terrorist attacks in the U.S.: https://www.adl.org/resources/backgrounders/christian-identity. The resurgence of nationalism has also meant a resurrection of anti-Semitic propaganda.

    The nationalist movements of Europe in the 1800s, from which the antisemitic conspiracy theories used in the Russian pogroms and Nazism first arose, prompted the Zionist movement movement to seek to create a Jewish nation in response. The founders of Zionism, who were European Jews, were made to feel that they would never be accepted by European nation-states that emphasized a common French, or German, or Italian, or Russian ethnicity as the basis of their existence, thereby relegating the Jewish ethnicity to a secondary status in European nations. The irony is that the modern Israeli government is doing the same thing to the Palestinian Arabs, both Christian and Muslim, who live in Israel as was done to the Jews in Europe in the 1800s, by declaring that Israel is a Jewish nation-state, thus relegating ethnic Arabs to a secondary position within Israel and further denying any hope of Palestinian Arabs and Jews sharing the same national space: https://www.swp-berlin.org/en/publication/israels-nation-state-law/

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  20. Roscuro,

    Why is it you use the term “a secondary position within Israel”.

    Those Arab citizens can vote, and are represented in the Knesset. They have the same rights as other citizens.

    Also this is inaccurate.

    “George Habash, was a Palestinian Christian”

    A left wing Palestinian terrorist who hijacked (and was the mastermind) a plane and also claimed to be Christian. You seem too willing to forget his crimes and that he worked against a two state solution to the conflict. He’s not really helping your point.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Habash

    “Black September
    The PFLP ignored tensions with the mainstream leadership of Yasser Arafat’s Fatah faction, and instead focused on bringing about revolutionary change in Jordan. Habash expressed the opinion that what proceeded was not “only military but also psychological warfare” and one had to “hold the Israelis under permanent pressure”.[9]

    In the 1970 Dawson’s Field hijackings, Habash masterminded the hijackings of four Western airliners over the United States, Europe, the Far East and the Persian Gulf. The aircraft were forced to fly to a World War II airfield in Jordan, the passengers and crews were disembarked and the planes were then blown up.

    The Dawson’s Field hijackings were instrumental in provoking the Black September crackdown, which came close to destroying the PLO. The hijackings led King Hussein of Jordan to carry out a major offensive against militant strongholds in his kingdom resulting in the deaths of thousands of Palestinians.[10] In autumn 1970, Habash visited Beijing. After Black September, the PLO fedayeen relocated to Lebanon.

    In 1972, Habash experienced failing health, and gradually began to lose influence within the organization. The Palestinian National Council’s (PNC) adoption of a resolution viewed by the PFLP as a two-state solution in 1974, prompted Habash to lead his organization out of active participation in the PLO and to join the Iraqi-backed Rejectionist Front. Only in 1977 would the PFLP opt to rejoin, as the Palestinian factions rallied their forces in opposition to Anwar Sadat’s overtures towards Israel, pro-U.S. policies and fragmentation of the Arab world. During the Lebanese Civil War that broke out in 1975, PFLP forces were decimated in battle against Syria. Later, the PFLP would draw close to Syria, as Syria’s government shifted, but PFLP involvement in the Lebanese war remained strong until the U.S.-negotiated evacuation of PLO units from Beirut in 1982, and continued on a smaller scale after that.”

    ——————-

    And why is this Christian leading a secular Palestinian Marxist–Leninist and revolutionary socialist organization?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popular_Front_for_the_Liberation_of_Palestine

    “The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) (Arabic: الجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين, al-Jabhah al-Sha`biyyah li-Taḥrīr Filasṭīn) is a secular Palestinian Marxist–Leninist and revolutionary socialist organization founded in 1967 by George Habash. It has consistently been the second-largest of the groups forming the Palestine Liberation Organization (the PLO, founded in 1964), the largest being Fatah (founded in 1959). As of 2015 the PFLP boycotts participation in the PLO Executive Committee[9][10][11] and the Palestinian National Council.[12]”

    ——

    “Formation of the PFLP
    After the Six-Day War of June 1967, ANM merged in August with two other groups, Youth for Revenge and Ahmed Jibril’s Syrian-backed Palestine Liberation Front, to form the PFLP, with Habash as leader.

    By early 1968, the PFLP had trained between one and three thousand guerrillas. It had the financial backing of Syria, and was headquartered there, and one of its training camps was based in as-Salt, Jordan. In 1969, the PFLP declared itself a Marxist–Leninist organization, but it has remained faithful to Pan Arabism, seeing the Palestinian struggle as part of a wider uprising against Western imperialism, which also aims to unite the Arab world by overthrowing “reactionary” regimes. It published a newspaper, al-Hadaf (The Target, or Goal), which was edited by Ghassan Kanafani.”

    —————

    He’s a terrorist, no matter which god he claims is his.

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  21. And there is nothing Christ like or Christian about mass murder.

    https://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Columnists/Our-World-Habashs-last-laugh

    ” Habash, the founder and commander of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine was a repugnant, fanatical, mass-murderer. Habash’s terror specialties included airplane hijacking, hostage taking, massacre, assassination, and suicide bombings. Far from an Islamic supremacist, Habash was a Christian. One of Habash’s signature tactics was his use of Nazi-style “selections.” After his henchmen hijacked passenger jets, they would walk among their hostages, separating the Jews from the non-Jews, or sometimes the Jews and the Americans from the non-Jews and non-Americans. They would let the non-Jews and non-Americans go, and hold the Jews and the Americans hostage. Habash was not simply a sworn enemy of the Jewish people, Israel and the United States. He was also the enemy of the Hashemites in Jordan. In August and September 1970, Habash conducted five sensationalist airline hijackings. The hijacked aircraft and his Jewish hostages were sent to Jordan. Habash’s hijackings were a central component of the PLO’s campaign – backed by Iraq and Syria – to overthrow the Hashemite dynasty and to replace it with a Communist Palestinian Soviet-satellite state. The PLO’s aims were only scuttled because Israel answered the late King Hussein’s pleas for help and stopped the Syrians and Iraqis from invading Jordan. “

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  22. She identified him as such….

    “George Habash, was a Palestinian Christian”

    So do the links from Wiki. He claimed he was (dead now), and identified himself as Christian. He wasn’t Muslim, or Christ like. But he was a terrorist. On that, all parties agree, in varying degrees, though some seem to think they can justify his crimes against his fellow man.

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  23. The word “Christian” is often used in a more cultural sense than a religious sense. I doubt Roscuro meant that he was a born again Bible-believing Christian.

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  24. The Real, in Middle Eastern culture, one is born into one’s religion, as much as one is born into one’s ethnicity, even more so, since both Christians and Muslims are both generally ethnically Arab but seldom intermarry. For Western thinkers, who are accustomed to the idea that religious affiliation is a choice, it helps to explain that there are essentially two kinds of Christians in the Middle East. Those who are Christians by birth, and, a smaller group of those who are Christians by choice. Members of the first group may be members of the second group, but the second group also includes converts from the other Middle Eastern religions, mainly Islam and Judaism, who tend to be much quieter about their faith due to the great stigma there is in converting from the religion into which one is born.

    Members of the first group, those who were born and baptized as infants into the Church, who are not a part of the second group who are Christians by faith often bear very rotten spiritual fruit, just as the apparently Christian nations of Catholic Europe did in the Middle Ages. The horrible history of the civil war in Lebanon during the 1980s shows that cultural Christian political groups in the Middle East are as capable of committing brutal atrocities as any radical Muslim group – the words Sabra and Shatila are still bitter reminders for Palestinian refugees in Lebanon of what Maronite (a branch of the Catholic Church) Lebanese were capable of committing (https://www.globalresearch.ca/israeli-crimes-against-humanity-remembering-the-sabra-and-shatila-massacre/5545969).

    In Middle Eastern culture, as it was in Europe before the 120th century, relegating a minority religion to a secondary status is part of the status quo. The Lebanese Civil War was in part triggered by the fact that while the Maronite Christians had ceased to be a majority in Lebanon, they still held the presidency and the majority of legislative positions in the government that was set up while under French administration – during the years of the French Protectorate in Syria, the French split off The Lebanon, a majority Maronite area, from the rest of Syria, but then added several other areas that were majority Muslim to form what is the modern state of Lebanon. The Maronites felt threatened by their gradual loss of majority status in the years following Lebanon’s independence and formed militant groups, such as the Phalange, whose violence against the Palestinian refugees served as the final trigger to the brutal Lebanese Civil War.

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  25. Israel is following the pattern of both former European culture and the old Islamic Empires in treating Arabs, both Christian and Muslim, in treating the ethnic/religious minority differently. In fact, Israel is very like the Ottoman Empire in not conscripting its Arab citizens into the military, as the Ottoman Empire did not conscript Christian or Jewish citizens of military age, instead charging them the jizya tax. Voting is not the only way to measure equality. There are other ways of denying certain groups full integration into society, ways that often lead to a minority becoming exasperated, like the Jim Crow era in the U.S., due to the kind of discrimination that takes place on a day to day, local level – https://urj.org/what-we-believe/resolutions/israeli-arab-citizens:

    ‘Yet like every democracy, Israel faces challenges in living up to its ideals. In particular, despite improvements in the lives of Israeli Arabs, too often the Israeli Arab reality falls short of the values of equality espoused in Israel’s founding document. According to a July 2008 report released by the Association for the Advancement of Civic Equality in Israel (Sikkuy), the gaps in health, housing, education, employment and welfare between the Arab and Jewish sectors in Israel have increased in recent years.[1] These gaps are a function of many historical and political factors involving not only decisions of the Israeli government but also those of local Israeli Jewish and Israeli Arab leaders regarding prioritization and allocation of resources. Fifty percent of Israeli Arabs (and 65.7 percent of Arab children) live below the poverty line, while that percentage decreases to 15.7 among Jews (and to 31.4 percent for Jewish children). Jews outpace Arabs in life expectancy and have lower rates of childbirth mortality.[2] The 2007 Sikkuy equality index reported that Israeli Arabs received “only 71 percent of the education resources due to them, based on their relative share in the population; 64 percent of what they are eligible for with regard to job-creation and training; and only 49 percent of their share of welfare funding,” and found large gaps in mortality rates and life expectancy, poverty, state employment, and other measurements.[3]’

    The Likud government currently in power in Israel has ties to ultra-Orthodox Jewish parties, with which it forms a coalition goverment, and a fundamentalist rabbinate religious court which is even denying Jews who have lost their ancestral records (such as through the Holocaust) the right to call themselves Jews: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/16/rabbis-block-marriages-israeljewish-identity-human-rights. In a political climate where even those who identify as Jews are being denied the right to be married by radical rabbis, other ethnic and religious minority groups will and do face discrimination.

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  26. The Troubles in Northern Ireland were supposed between Catholics and Protestants, but neither side committing those atrocities were actually Christian in the sense that we think of Christian.

    In his book, Kingdoms in Conflict, Chuck Colson wrote about how some of the Catholic and Protestant terrorists would get saved in prison, and would then make peace with their now brothers-in-Christ.

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  27. Kizzie, the analogy to The Troubles has crossed my mind. But sometimes the line between cultural and faithful Christian was blurred by supporters of one side or the other in that conflict. For example, there were Christians in the conservative and fundamentalist circles which I grew up in who wholeheartedly supported Ian Paisley, the man called the Butcher of Belfast for the way he stirred up violent anger amongst Protestants toward Catholics (the former pastor who resigned from the tiny church my family attends had met Paisley and obviously hero-worshipped him, insisting Paisley was really a very loving man). Paisley was a pastor of a Free Presbyterian Church as well as being a political figure, and when, in the 1990s, he formed a coalition with the leader of the Catholic party Sinn Fein, thereby bringing to an end The Troubles, his own church excommunicated him because he did what he had agitated against for decades before.

    Palestinian Christians belong to a number of different denominations. I would say that those belonging to the more historical denominations, such as the Melkite Greek Catholic Church (Melkite is the historical denomination of Palestine) are more likely to be cultural Christians than those who are members of a modern denomination, i.e. Protestant or Baptist, who may be convert either from an older denomination or from Islam.

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  28. I raised the issue of PFLP’s religious affiliation as it discredits the narrative the ladies are somehow supporting Islamic terrorists. Almost every action Ive seen so far has led me to believe they are moderate Muslims accepting of a secular society.

    The Christian Arab acceptance of the PFLP reflects its secularism. Furthermore its leftist orientation appeals to Christain Arabs as it advocates it end to corrupt aristocrat conservative Muslim regimes such as Saudi Arabia. Unlike the conservative Arab monarchies it supports Assad not ISIS or other Islamic groups in Syria. (The Baathist regimes in Iraq and Syria were far mote tolerant)

    Obviously, given their tactics, one can question their Christianity but one should also admit it does represent Arab Christians politically. And given its political role in the West Bank, why not visit the leadership. Quite frankly, I’d support meeting the PFLP than supporting Saudis in any form esp their intervention in Yemen. Something both Israel and the US support.

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  29. More Jew hating from members of Congress.

    ————-

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  30. Aj

    The jpost link is far too biased to be taken seriously. The reference to a Nazi like selection process is absurd. Any terrorist, warlord, guerrilla, bandit etc would separate any group of hostages according to nationality. You release third world nationals. You ransom off Europeans, Japanese, Koreans and rich Arabs. Those countries have a history of paying for their citizen’s release. Depending on your political aims you would keep citizens from certain countries. Finally, that leaves citizens from countries which won’t negotiate and havd no political power but have money. Its fairly well know that Australia, Canada and NZ rarely negotiate or pay ransom. Either a private ransom is paid by the family or the hostages are held for a long until time the criminals realize that its a waste of effort and release them.

    Thus, its not a Nazi like selection but a simple business process groups world wide use. The Jerusalem Post is simply trying to create an image to anger Israeli supporters. It has no credibility here.

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  31. How is that cartoon “Jew Hating” it simply demonstrates that Bibi and Trump would like the ladies not to speak up about Palestine. Pretty much the truth.

    And what relevance has a 13 yr old award have to do with the cartoon. An obvious ad hominem attempt to skewer the perception of a 2019 cartoon.

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  32. HRW, there is no doubt that the Christians of the Middle East have a very different opinion of Israel than their counterparts in the West, something that Western Christians repeatedly fail to recognize and acknowledge – I recall the attempted speech by Ted Cruze at the In Defense of Christians conference in 2014 when he tried to insist that Israel was the natural ally of Middle Eastern Christian and should be supported by them: https://time.com/3328063/ted-cruz-booed-israel-christian-middle-east/.

    Certainly, the terrorist activities historically carried out by the PFLP are unacceptable in those who claim to follow Christ. Terrorism is always the wrong response. But it should be recognized that to the Palestinians, whether Christian or Muslim, Israel is an occupying force, and acknowledged that the temptation to resist would be great if any of our lands were so occupied. I cannot agree with the methods of the Palestinian Christian resistance, but I sympathize with the sense of displacement from their land that they have. If the PFLP is refocusing their energy to useful projects, that would be completely acceptable. To often the Palestinians are dehumanized in Western Christian circles, and it is forgotten that they are simply humans, just like the Israelis.

    The economic and political support of Western countries for the Saudis is always surprising to consider, given the Wahabbism of the Saudi state is one of the most extreme forms of Islamic interpretation. All but four of the hijackers on 9/11 were Saudi citizens, yet the Middle Eastern countries who were placed on the travel ban which ostensibly is for the protection of U.S. citizens from terrorists and extremists are Syria, Iraq, and Iraq, countries in which the Christian population has been severely persecuted and even suffered genocide, while still allowing entrance to Saudis, where it is nearly impossible to be a Christian. At the same Christian refugees from Syria, Iraq, and Iran have effectively been blocked from finding refuge in the U.S.: https://world.wng.org/2019/03/left_behind

    ‘The number of Middle East Christians admitted into the United States in 2018 fell by a staggering 98 percent from 2016. Christians from countries Open Doors ranked highest for religious persecution saw a 76 percent decline from 2016 to 2018. The trend continues in 2019. By March 2019 the United States had welcomed only 30 Iranian Christians, 25 Iraqi Christians, and zero Syrian Christian refugees.’

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