77 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 4-9-19

  1. Good morning everyone but Jo.
    Good evening Jo.
    When my Linda fixed my blog, “Wandering Views” was moved to another place on the sidebar, it took me a few seconds to find it.

    I can’t “LIKE” anything, but I can still comment. That’s the main thing.
    🙂

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  2. Re: the discussion yesterday about crucifixes, etc.

    Loraine Boettner, in his book Roman Catholicism (Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Co., 1962) says that in the Catholic church “Christ usually represented as a helpless babe in a manger or in His mother’s arms, or as a dead Christ upon a cross.” (page 146) They do that so the people will turn to Mary as their representative before God. He describes this as “the effective way they have caused Mary to usurp the place of Christ as the primary mediator between God and men.” (ibid)

    It is for this reason all crucifixes are nothing more than idols, but most Catholics don’t realize they are worshiping an image instead of Jesus Himself.

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  3. I am off to my bone scan.
    Next up is to find time to do a 24 hour urine test. If you know me at all you know how difficult that will be. I am going to have to stay home for that because I just can’t picture me hauling around a mini cooler full of urine. Ugh yuck. Disgusting

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  4. Good morning.
    Good reason to take a day off, Kim.
    Glad to see Chas is able to be here.
    I never thought of the crucifix in that manner, Peter. Thank you for sharing that info.

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  5. I really like the new header photo, and it’s doing well in my Flickr account, too. It’s two common snapping turtles, the first time I’ve seen two large snapping turtles together. That same day I was standing next to the pond photographing the turtles on the log, and suddenly there was a big commotion and a lot of churning water, and two snapping turtles–but they had grass between me and them, and my camera couldn’t focus fast enough. I don’t know if it was an attempted mating (my suspicion) or a fight. But this scene was a bit later, whether just minutes later or on either side of a walk along the trail, I don’t remember. (I think I walked the trail and came back, but don’t remember for certain.) So my hunch is that this is both snapping turtles, the male on this side keeping an eye on her and hoping she’ll become more receptive.

    They did eventually come quite close together, and I watched and hoped to see a mating, but nothing happened quickly and I knew my husband was wanting me home soon. (We had plans to do something in an hour or so when I went for a quick walk.) So I left without seeing if they managed to work it out, but I did get one cool photo with both heads above water. With snapping turtles you seem more commonly to see the floating shell, while the head is underwater looking for food or whatever turtle heads do under water. It seems a sneaky way to hunt, to drift along as though a mass of floating debris, just a bit faster than the current, and then have a head that can grab something to eat. Snapping turtles are said to be the masters of their ponds, since they’ll eat almost anything alive in it, given the chance.

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  6. I do not think that the representation of the crucifix had anything to do with the medieval rise of the cult of Mary. I say this as a convinced Baptist who does not think visual representations are necessary for worship but also as someone who is interested in the Church through the ages and across cultures. R.C. Sproul, who was as Presbyterian as it gets, admitted that the Catholics are often misrepresented by Protestants. The medieval cult of Mary was grievous, but the Immaculate Conception of Mary (which claims that Mary’s sin nature was retroactively cleansed by the blood of Christ when she was conceived in her mother’s womb – in other words, Catholic do not deify Mary, and still say Christ was her Saviour, even though the Immaculate Conception is unnecessary and adding to Scripture) was not accepted as official Catholic dogma until the mid-1800s, at a time when the Catholic church was being very reactionary to the spreading Protestant influence – it was also during that era that papal infallibility was made official doctrine. In other words, although Mary has been venerated by individual Catholics since at least the Middle Ages, the veneration was not officially encouraged by the Vatican until much more recently, and furthermore, the use of crucifixes date to before the Catholic church was the Catholic church. Neither the visual representations of Christ nor the elevated status of Mary are something that is unique to Catholicism. There are other, even older branches of the Church, the Coptic, the Orthodox, the Assyrian, which also use similar imagery and also venerate Mary.

    In fact, the veneration of Mary might be said to have arisen out of the Arian controversy, as an over correction of another false doctrine, as it were. The Arians denied that Jesus was fully God, which, as the Apostles Paul and John warned, is a deadly doctrine indeed. Such orthodox defenders of the faith as Athanasius and Augustine of Hippo replied by pointing out the truth that Jesus was God and was conceived as the God man, using the term ‘theotokos’, literally meaning God-bearer but often translated as Mother of God, to describe Mary. In doing so, they were absolutely correct. Mary indeed nurtured the Incarnated Son of God in her womb for nine months and gave birth to him. For that reason, she was called blessed among women by the angel Gabriel. What they said in the defense of the deity of Christ about Mary was entirely Biblical. But those who came after Athanasius and Augustine took their words on Mary a little further and began to venerate Mary as the perpetual Virgin who bore God. Christ as the Judge and Ruler of the earth, Christ Pantokrator, was often emphasized in Church iconography – in the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, now know as Istanbul, such an icon of Christ Pantokrator may be seen. In other words, Christ’s deity was overemphasized in an overcorrection to Arianism, and his humanity less emphasized. As a result, Mary, as the theotokos, began to seem more approachable to the common folk. The cult of Mary was a grass roots movement, not something imposed from the top down.

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  7. Re: My problem with the blog. It was something I did. I was just messing around and clicked on “Wandering Views”. And everything went astray.
    Then, I asked my DIL, Linda who knows a bit about computers, about it. She worked on it a while so I could enter something. I finally got to where I could comment, but I couldn’t see what I was doing.
    Then she came over to stay with Elvera while I went to Lions. During that time she teamed up with AJ and they, together, fixed it for me.
    So? For bettor or worse, here I am.
    Thanx again AJ.

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  8. I forgot that I need to go down and enter my name every time. But You knew who it was.

    Mumsee was teasing me about mapping the moon, but couldn’t blog.
    I have said before, I let the technology pass me by because I have no use any of it.
    When I got my master’s at Purdue, I spent one Sunday afternoon triangulating across Indiana. All afternoon, I had to interpolate numbers and enter 3.14159 on my calculator..
    Later when Chuck was at Carolina, I bought him a TI-59 You could program it with Pi a constant. He could do in half an hour what it took me four hours to do.
    When Chuck’s daughters went to college, they had laptop computers.

    Thursday, I’m going to give some Lunar maps to U. S. Carolina. With them I’m adding some computer punch cards. Some people may not know what they are. 1970 technology, that’s what.

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  9. I do not have an issue with representations of a man to illustrate the life and ministry of Jesus, because Jesus was manifest in the flesh and as a human, was visible and could be touched; and the Bible contains some physical descriptions of him that cause such visual images to be formed in the mind when reading or hearing the descriptive words – for example Revelation 1:12-16:
    ‘When I turned I saw seven gold lampstands, and among the lampstands was One like the Son of Man, dressed in a long robe and with a gold sash wrapped around His chest. His head and hair were white like wool—white as snow—and His eyes like a fiery flame. His feet were like fine bronze as it is fired in a furnace, and His voice like the sound of cascading waters. He had seven stars in His right hand; a sharp double-edged sword came from His mouth, and His face was shining like the sun at midday.’

    I find it hard to believe that one would not mentally visualize some kind of form from that description. In church last Sunday, Hebrew 1 was read, and the beginning phrases speak of how Christ’s Incarnation did supply us with God’s image, something that John 1 also said:
    “God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds; Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high” (Hebrews 1:1-3)
    “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth… No man hath seen God at any time, the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him.” (John 1:14, 18)

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  10. It is that physical representation of God which both Jews and Muslims find so offensive about Christianity. It is disgusting to them that God could be borne from a woman’s womb, that he could eat, sleep, eliminate in human form. They are so committed to the idea that God is Spirit and must not be represented in a physical image that they reject the Gospel of Jesus Christ as idolatry. I recently watched the Coen brother’s film ‘Hail Cesear’, which I am not sure I would recommend due to periods of crude language and crude humour, but there was a fascinating scene where the film studio manager, whose studio is making a film about Jesus, asks a Protestant minister, an Catholic priest, an Orthodox patriarch, and a Jewish rabbi for their input. The three Christian authorities get into a discussion the nature of the deity and humanity of Christ, while the rabbi rolls his eyes and scoffs at the whole idea – meanwhile the studio manager insists he just wants to know if the movie won’t offend anyone. In subsequent scenes, it is humourously shown how the character of the Christ gets forgotten in the movie plot as the star actor is the Centurion at the cross, with one stage hand asking the actor who plays Jesus if he is an extra or a main character, as the Coen brothers poke fun at the 1950s blockbuster Bible films such as The Robe or Ben Hur.

    I do, however, see a need for caution in the use of illustrations of Christ. It is one thing, for example, for Gustave Dore’s Bible engravings or similar low key illustrations to be used in Bible stories. It is another to place a large crucifix or Good Shepherd or Madonna and child in a prominent place in a church. The reason for this is that it could give offense, not just to Jews and Muslims, who would perceive as idolatry, but also to Hindus and Buddhists, who would also perceive it as idolatry, not in a negative, but a positive light. This has been brought home to me when I have watched films in Hindi that depict Christians. Christians have existed in India since the time of the Apostles, but their iconography has been influenced by the Portuguese Jesuits who took over part of their churches after Portuguese explorers sailed around Africa and established trade routes with India. There are quite a few popular Hindi films which have Christians as main characters, and they are often portrayed as praying in front of a crucifix or Madonna and child, in a way that closely parallels scenes of Hindus praying in front of their deities. The equivalent religion message from the film producers is hard to miss. The Indian film industry is, similar to Hollywood, the liberal influence in a country that is turning towards Hindu nationalism and radicalism (see the article I shared on yesterday’s thread) and intolerance of other religions, so they often depict both Christians and Muslims as being just another way of life like Hinduism in an effort to promote religious tolerance in a country whose elected government at least does not stop displays of religious intolerance from its Hindu nationalist supporters. But such a perception of Christianity, as simply another religion with its own rituals and idols, does nothing to promote the message of Jesus Christ. For that reason, I would discourage the use of Christian iconography.

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  11. Good to have you back Chas — you keep up with technology a lot better than many people.

    I think there’s always going to be a need to follow technology to some degree. Bemoan it or not, just look at how the personal computer and smart phones have taken over so many things in our culture in the past 20 years. New cars (not that I’m familiar with those) all have tech screens with gps and internet capability. The rest of us with older cars can still install updated bluetooth radios (which is what I did when my factory radio died) that are quite amazing – enabling you to answer your phone, and listen to GPS instructions, all through your car’s own audio system. There are clear downsides, but technology makes our lives easier in so many ways.

    My neighbors got home yesterday so I spent some time with them in their backyard after I took their mail over. We had some strange weather yesterday, balmy almost, very windy and warm. It’s supposed to cool off starting today but we’ll still have some winds.

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  12. Daughter waited outside for her ride yesterday morning, for half an hour. GPS had taken the new driver to the neighbor’s house where driver was patiently waiting. He finally called husband who directed him back to our house. GPS always sends people over there. We tell them but they listen to GPS instead.

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  13. We have tried to get a new driver for daughter for a long time. Her Catholic, Baptist, witch, earth worshipper driver was not doing her any good. But I think the thing that finally got the official attention was that she refuses to wear a seatbelt. Finally, daughter’s psychiatrist got involved and told daughter she was not allowed to get in the car if that driver came for her again. So when the driver showed up, daughter told her she was not allowed in the car. Now we finally have a new company with new drivers. Hopefully, they will respect that they are driving a fragile person and keep their strange ideas to themselves.

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  14. On the Mary front: yes, Mary is called blessed and we call her that as well. Though, I am very glad I was not born in that time and consider myself to be blessed as well. But in daughter’s mind, Mary is far beyond that. When she is “off her rocker” she turns to Mary and prayer to Mary. She thinks if she tries hard enough, she can be perfect like Mary. That crosses the line from calling her blessed to worship. And she does it through a rosary book she got from one of her brothers when she was in the psych ward. She hides it so I can’t throw it away. I would not throw it away if I did find it because I believe God has to do the work in her heart or it just does not happen.

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  15. I grew up in a pseudo-Catholic home and never remember being told to worship the crucifix–which towered high in our majestic church. It was always to me a reminder of Jesus’ death on the cross, nothing more, and a grisly image to have at the front of the church in my six-year-old opinion.

    Mary was another matter because of the prayers. There was worship and putting trust in her there.

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  16. Ah, the second turtle appears. For the longest time there was only one that I could see — so I kept looking for the second one, thinking it was “me.” My morning eye exercises.

    GPS can be wrong and probably especially in areas where there aren’t freeways and major roads. But it’s been a great help to many of us.

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  17. that was me

    GPS has safely guided husband to his destinations as a truck driver. Most of the time. Others’ not so well. And it does insist on driving through construction and over bridges trucks are not allowed on.

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  18. GPS is an array (don’t recall how many) of satellites that have known positions. i.e. well defined orbits. Every place on earth is seen by three satellites at the same time, (More if possible, but it takes three to fix a point)
    You query the system and it tells you where you, or any other identified person who has a receiver are.
    I know how it works, but how it can do it so quickly is amazing to me. It has to have a hundred queries at any given time.
    It was originally developed as a defense navigation system. i.e. Airplanes no longer use navigators nor radio operators. When I was in, both were required on any plane leaving continental US.

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  19. The girls and I often laugh about a time when my mom was taking us all out to a new place for breakfast in a different, bigger town. Her GPS was insisting she take a left, which would have entailed driving over grass to get where we were going. She chose to ignore that, and finally found the right way. We were all laughing at the situation.

    Easter eggs? I don’t have a problem with them, but that’s because, like with Christmas, I make a division in my mind between the religious aspect of it and the secular aspect of it. (As for the candy variety of eggs, I am partial to the Reese’s kind. 🙂 )

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  20. Yesterday morning, Janie’s collar got caught on something in my dishwasher (she was sniffing a fork I had just put in), and she got scared and ran off, taking the lower rack out with her. Fortunately, there were only two plates in there. One was fine, but the other, a Corelle plate, shattered into a million pieces, scattered all over the whole kitchen floor! I was so angry, my hands were shaking.

    The one positive is that I had let the kitchen floor go a little too long between cleanings, so this forced me to give it a good sweeping and cleaning. I was actually glad to have that out of the way when I finished.

    I can laugh about it now, but I was really, really angry for a while after it happened.

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  21. For traffic alerts, there’s the Waze app. Sometimes I’ll use it at work before leaving, just to make sure there’s not some massive tie-up on the bridges

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  22. I love all things Easter. I bought an Easter platter the other day at Pottery Barn. It has flowers around the edges and a bunny in the middle. I was just at Williams Sonoma and was about to buy some Peter Rabbit cookies for Missy’s Easter basket but they we $25 and I decided not for her age.
    The Bunny always bough BG a new swim suit and he has a cute one for missy

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  23. Chas, are you going to see Apollo 11 (documentary style) at an Imax theater? Sounds impressive with original film footage and some never shown before.

    From one film critic: “Late in the film, after Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins have been there and back again, we see a shot of the control tower of the aircraft carrier that was sent to retrieve the capsule after splashdown. The moon is hanging in the evening sky, small in the frame, a pale dish. We feel differently about it having been there. But it has lost none of its majesty, because we understand how much work it took to visit it.”

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  24. The Apollo program was quite a feat. It was done because of the challenge of Kennedy.
    I don’t oppose lunar exploration. But I see no reason to return.
    I have a picture of the Apollo 12 astronaut in his Lunar garb.
    I call it, “The Lunar bikini”. That’s what’s required for existence on the moon.
    No reason to return.

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  25. I don’t have any issue with Easter eggs. We (husband and I) enjoy colouring them, although with no kids around…

    On another note, we only have 12 spots left in our camp for the summer!!! This is crazy. The other camps around think we fudge things when we say we’re sold out of some camp weeks because they just don’t believe it. We don’t lie. 🙂

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  26. Chas, you have good taste in calculators. My father also bought me a TI-59 when I was in college. I loved that calculator. Not only did it have a pi button, but it had parentheses buttons and was programmable.

    The big nerd debate back then was between TI and HP scientific calculators. It was like an early version of the Windows vs Mac debate.

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  27. When our children were small we hid plastic eggs with goodies inside, and colored real eggs. Since they’ve grown up we haven’t done those things, but I don’t see them as a problem.

    We do usually have chocolate eggs around.

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  28. Michelle’s QOD: I have already written many posts on how the pagan origins theory of Christian celebrations are invalid. I will simply ask one question. Who created the egg?

    “For everything created by God is good, and nothing should be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving.” (I Timothy 4:4)

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  29. I mentioned Constantinople/Istanbul earlier. When I was reading historical documents for the course in Middle Eastern history that I took, I discovered that the Turkish Ottoman empire actually had not renamed Constantinople after taking it from the Byzantines in 1453 – their official government documents retained the name. It was not until the 20th century, after 1925, that Istanbul became the official name of Constantinople. All of which reminds me of a song my father started to sing whenever the city was mentioned:

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  30. I don’t mind Easter eggs, but dislike the Easter bunny. I’ve never liked talking animals anyway (with rare exceptions) and never did, but the Easter bunny just seems silly.

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  31. No problem with easter eggs, especially the Cadbury ones.

    As for worshiping Mary, veneration is too close to worship. And why does the Rosary have ten “Hail Mary” prayers for every one of the Lord’s prayer (called the “Our Father” by Catholics)?

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  32. I agree that the current Easter bunny seems downright silly. I believe the original imagery, to be found in some of those enormously complicated old religious paintings that were packed full of symbols was that of a hare, a more dignified relative of the lowly rabbit. The hare is variously supposed to represent the Virgin Mary* or Christ himself – either representation also explains why the hare brings the eggs. In either case, the tradition was one analogy/illustration/metaphor for the gift of God’s Son in his death and resurrection.

    *Since at least the 200s, based on a Jewish tradition concerning the beginning and end of a prophet’s life, Christ had been supposed to have died on the same day he was conceived. Augustine of Hippo wrote in On the Trinity: “For he [Jesus] is believed to have been conceived on the 25th of March, upon which day also he suffered; so the womb of the Virgin, in which he was conceived, where no one of mortals was begotten, corresponds to the new grave in which he was buried, wherein was never man laid, neither before him nor since.” This is why the Feast of the Annunciation – of Gabriel to the Virgin Mary – comes during Lent (it was on March 25th this year). This dating method also supplies the reason why December 25 is the Feast of Nativity or Christmas, because it is nine months from March 25.

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  33. I’ve decided I want to be a wildlife photographer when I grow up. Or maybe I already am! This morning I spent more than three hours standing beside “my” pond, because so much was going on I couldn’t tear myself away.

    I had good sightings of birds (mostly a great egret, but also a red-winged blackbird and a Canada goose), turtles (multiple species, including an interesting and weird one I hadn’t seen before, a softshell turtle), and a mammal (a weasel species–the Canada goose attacked it two different times it came out, making it impossible for me to get good photos, but I did get photos that show some of the creature). The coolest turtle sightings, besides the softshell, were a lot of snapping turtle activity: they were crawling into the mud, attempting to mate with each other (leading to great explosions of water as the female raced away) . . . and I stayed down there so long in an attempt to get a good photo of a turtle hitch hiker, a small turtle riding on the back of a snapping turtle. Snapping turtles move around a pond with their heads underwater, often with part or all of their shells exposed but only coming up periodically, presumably to breathe. So you have to watch the turtle a long time before you see its head or get a good chance to take a photo.

    The great egret in breeding plumage was a really cool sighting. They don’t breed in much of Indiana (just a far northwestern corner) and so I’ve only seen them in breeding plumes once, in Florida, and they were shedding them at the end of the season then. And I’ve only seen them a few times at all. Seeing one on my “home pond” just half a mile away was quite special–and it was there the whole time I was, there when I arrived and still there when I left three-and-a-half hours later.

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  34. Peter, I do not deny that the average Catholic who prays to Mary is giving her worship. I have made it clear that I do not defend the veneration or worship of Mary. It is merely that there is a separation between official Catholic doctrine and common Catholic practice. That is hardly surprising. There are a good many denominations who hold official stances an given issue which have members who do not believe or practice the official stance, and whose practice may actually contradict the official stance. A more scholarly Catholic would say that the prayers to Mary or the saints are not the same as the prayers made to God and base their arguments on the ‘clouds of witness’ verse in Hebrews 12:1. I have listened to a modern orthodox Catholic family do their devotions, and they prayed straight to God, with no intermediary.

    But, Protestants have always tended to over correct Catholic faults, and one of their over corrections has been to strip Mary even of the blessing of Gabriel that is a part of the canon of Scripture. Mary was chosen to fulfill the first promise of salvation given to humanity, that the seed of the woman would crush the head of the serpent (Genesis 3:15). That is why she was called blessed among women, as it was a woman who was to bear the Saviour. Gabriel’s blessing to Mary was the reversal of the curse on Eve.

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  35. Thanks for reminding me about the Easter eggs. I have for my class and have given to my children plastic resurrection eggs. They are fun to hide and have inside little toys that tell the Easter story. There is a donkey, a goblet, burial cloths, coins, a spear, etc.

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  36. oh, I got my car back. It needs a new radiator and a new engine, which I am not going to do as there is no way to do it. I will just drive it anyway. It is such a short distance here, that I am hoping it can make it. Should be an adventure. No more giving rides or putting my keys into my teacher mailbox for anyone to use it whenever they like. Just a few short trips, praying all the way.

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  37. Nightingale met with her “kick-[butt] lawyer” yesterday after work, and she likes her very much. Ms. Lawyer says X doesn’t have a case, although there are one or two minor matters that Nightingale should handle differently. She also thinks Nightingale could finally get sole custody.

    Not only that, but X still owes Nightingale thousands of dollars in back child support. Since he’s been on SSDI, the state has paid her child support each month, but he still owes from before that.

    If this goes the way Ms. Lawyer thinks it will, X will be kicking himself for shooting himself in the foot with this complaint.

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  38. Jo, those eggs sound like something I would have loved as a child, although I probably would want to get all the different things just for myself. My most favourite Bible craft ever as a child involved making five loaves and two fish out of appropriately coloured modeling clay and putting them in a small basket. I love little models to illustrate/represent Bible stories. Even when I was a Sunday School teacher, I made a little model of Jerusalem for the stories of the siege of the Assyrians (Hezekiah) and also the siege of the Babylonians – my inspiration was entirely Biblical, from the model siege that Ezekiel was told to make – and did a four-sided shadow box for the story of Darius and Daniel and a diorama for one of the sea of Galilee scenes.

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  39. It’s finally happened, I got a story pitch that I simply cannot decipher. Feeling out of it …

    _____________________________

    Hi!

    Checking in for the 22Red drop this weekend. Shavo will be at MMD Hollywood this Saturday, April 13 dropping two limited edition strains: GT22 and 22AF. We would love to have you come and check out the strains and meet Shavo. Let me know if you have any questions and if you’re unable to attend, I can send samples of the strains as well.

    Best,
    _____________________________________

    Either lipstick or marijuana, I think.

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  40. Back to little models and Bible stories, I had an action figure when I was young. It was Samson, complete with the jawbone of an ass. It was a sad day when I lost the little jawbone.

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  41. I don’t know about PNG, but I think another car would be as inexpensive as a new engine and radiator. If I were in that situation, and not afraid of being stranded, I would drive the old one until it quit. Or, preferably, get another one now.

    I would like to see Apollo 11. It was the first manned trip to the moon. But I don’t go anywhere much any more because I have to get someone to stay with TSWITW. Can’t leave her alone.

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  42. I am unable to like comments again.

    We just had a rain storm. I should have moved the car out of the carport to get the pollen washed off.

    I have not heard from Karen today. She probably did not go to her doctor appointment and does not want to tell me. I am not going to judge her about that. I will try to call her. If she did go she is too tired to talk probably. I really wish her husband would retire.

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  43. Roscuro, I don’t know but I also saw a ‘Shavo’ turn up in google so maybe so. I’m decidedly behind the hip cultural curve nowadays

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  44. Janice – I had forgotten that Karen is married. I don’t mean to sound critical, but it seems to me that her husband should be taking the initiative to get his wife to her appointments by either taking time off to take her himself or finding someone who can. It makes me sad to think that he is “letting” her miss so many appointments. (Hubby would not have been able to get out during the workday, but he would have done what he could to arrange something for me, if Nightingale were not available.)

    Speaking of rain, Nightingale left her moon-roof wide open the other night, and it not only rained that night, it poured!

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  45. Ah, I found an earlier email from her:

    ______________________________

    I hope this finds you well! Shavo Odadjian, bassist for System Of A Down, will be hosting a Meet & Greet for his 22Red cannabis drop at MMD dispensary on Saturday, April 13. The drop co-insides with International Record Store Day, where Amoeba Music will be hosting a party down the street. We would love to have you come out and celebrate with us! Shavo will be available for interviews throughout the day and we will have samples of the new strains for you to check out! Let me know if you can make it and I look forward to hearing from you soon!
    ________________________________

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  46. I can’t “Like” either. I think I said that before.
    Mumsee, TSWITW and I were indeed married in 1957. That is almost 62 years ago (on 9 June).
    Gravitar wants me to sign in to “WordPress” or some such. I’m afraid to sign in to anything now.

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  47. We have had some rain of late. Last night was heavy all night. Today, all the roads out of Kamiah are closed except the old grade and they are thinking of closing that as well due to potential mud slides. I am very grateful to live up here with a sloped yard. The turkeys have a lot of water, even though they are sloped as well. They have that thick mucky black clay Michelle was wandering around in Saturday. We throw a lot of bark in there to give them something to walk on but that has all gone under. I may have to let them free range but that is the end of my gardens if they do.

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  48. Well, I just got a wonderful opportunity for my “side business” (wildlife photography–which has never yet brought me in a dime). I decided spur of the moment to walk down to the pond on the slight chance the egret was still there, to try to photograph it during magic hour. I figured it wouldn’t be, but it might–and something different might be worth seeing if it was not present.

    Well, very close to my side of the pond (in the water) was a large animal, possibly a turtle, that seemed to be feeding or doing something in the water, but its posture was odd and I couldn’t really figure it out. In such instances I take photos and hope eventually I figure out what is going on–my best guess was that it was rooting for something on the bottom. I thought it was a snapping turtle but wasn’t really sure. At some point I wondered if by chance it was a mammal (all I could see was a dark mass), and zoomed in a bit more to see, and verified it was a turtle. But then it moved, coming up for air, and I was able to see what I was watching: a mating pair of snapping turtles! They were in the water but as close to me as possible, which was good because I wouldn’t have been able to get photos as sunlight diminished had they been farther away. But it was the closest I’d ever been to snapping turtles, and a chance I imagine very few amateur herpetologists get–at least they won’t get it less than 20 feet away!

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  49. The new turtle header was from the first “turtle day” of the year. That is also a snapping turtle, but it was so covered in mud that for a time I didn’t realize it was an animal. Eventually it occurred to me it might be a turtle, and I zoomed in. But this is the only shot I got of it with its eye open, and the closed-eye shots were really hard to identify as turtles! The shape is turtle-y, but not obviously a turtle.

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