77 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 1-29-19

  1. Good morning everyone.
    I’m sure Jo is in the sack by now.

    I notice the ladies had the entire blog yesterday.
    We men don’t know nothing about having babies.

    I was teaching a SS lesson years ago about David and Bathsheba.
    Bathsheba came in and told David “I am with child”>
    I said that if that happened today, David would say, “”Just go see Dr. Jackson and come back without child. Have him send me the bill.”
    I have no doubt that the man who had Uriah killed would have had her abort the child.

    But then history would have changed, wouldn’t it?
    We have no idea how history is being changed..

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I couldn’t sleep so came on here to say good night all and
    good morning, Chas.
    I created all new address files tonight as mine had disappeared for my newsletter. Hopefully it has now been sent to everyone.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Good morning! The precipitation has begun, but the weather report makes it sound like we will get little snow/ice here. Even so, I stayed home because if it changes as Atlanta is known for, then I will not be stuck at the office for several days.

    Yesterdsy we left a little after 7:30 a.m. and got home at 9:00 p.m. it was a long and busy day. We had a full house of five people at work. I did a bit of training but was in the kitchen for part of the day since I had to give up my desk (at my suggestion) for a new person. I did not want the new person to have to be over in the other side of our space where we have had water damage. It would also be isolated from the rest of us. The new person is between jobs and is working to help while she interviews for another position. The older lady, former owner of the business is not working this year I think she turned 90 in Oct. Definitely time to retire.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. A bit of advice.
    I have been getting e-mails from FedEx and USPS that I have packages/data that can’t be delivered because they need some information.
    There is no reason for either to need anything they don’t have.
    BEWARE

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Morning! Plenty of snow on the ground and the pines. The sun is shining and with a high of 30 we should see a bit of melting. Words cannot describe how beautiful this forest is this morning!
    Birdie is singing away and jumping from one perch to another…he is quite active in the morning. Who knew a small feathered friend could bring so much enjoyment? 🐦
    Now I am off to find Jo’s Newsletter…I should have checked my emails first!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. It is bitterly cold again, here. We’re off to the normal post-op appointment. Perhaps the surgeon will be able to get some relief for Tim’s headache from the spinal fluid leak.

    So thankful for all the firewood. We had to load the furnace a few times in the night as it is so cold. Normally we only add wood once or not at all during the night.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. AJ, great egret or snowy? Can’t see its feet (whether or not they’re the snowy’s yellow) and I don’t know the species well enough to remember other field marks without looking them up. (If I had to guess, I’d say great since it looks tall.) Lovely shot, though!

    We have a light dusting of snow here, but the next few days (especially tomorrow) are supposed to be really cold. (Wind chills tomorrow of -20 to -40.) I have no intention of even stepping outside in the next 48 to 72 hours. I got in walks Sunday and yesterday to get some exercise before we got here, so that I can stay in again without cabin fever.

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  8. Good Morning Everyone. I am doing my best to work from home this morning. I am off to a slow start. I was away for several hours yesterday morning and worked a full day. This morning I was also awake for several hours and none of my “remedies” worked. I slept until 7:30 which puts me way behind with my day.
    We are having “Family Dinner” at my friend M’s tonight. BG is coming. I have also invited my nephew. He will provide a buffer between the two of us. Also, he used to be M’s “house boy” or as he liked to say, her personal assistant.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Chas “We men don’t know nothing about having babies”
    That doesn’t need to be the case. One can understand another human’s experience by listening and learning. I am a woman, but I have never had a child, so all I know is from listening, learning, and witnessing the experience of others. I have seen male physicians deliver babies who were professional and compassionate to the labouring mothers and their work was excellent. Christ was a man, but He gave one of the most accurate description of the woman’s experience of labour that I have ever seen: “When a woman is giving birth, she has sorrow because her hour has come, but when she has delivered the baby, she no longer remembers the anguish, for joy that a human being has been born into the world.” (John 6:21, ESV)

    Liked by 4 people

  10. I, too, know a woman who was told that her unborn baby was dead and was encouraged to let nature takes its course. She was told that would be better for her than trying to remove the fetus immediately. I think it was a couple of weeks before she delivered. It was a matter of some prayer not only for physical health, but for the horror and sadness of knowing your baby is no longer living.

    I will lay the blame of the pro-life seeming to be against any removal of a fetus early at the feet of pro-abortion activists. It was those people who began to use the excuse of ‘health’ of the mother to mean anything and everything. A woman feeling a bit depressed or emotionally unstable was reason enough and any woman can claim that.

    I was accused of wanting my own niece to die from ectopic pregnancy. At least, that is what the person discussing abortion said. I have no idea if she did have an ectopic pregnancy, since the person has been known to fudge facts for the sake of argument. Beyond that, that person should have known me better. The drama of the statement, though, was great for the discussion and cut off all debate.

    If we only had abortion for the hard cases we would have very few.

    I know of many cases where doctors gave terrible predictions about babies in the womb. In fact, I would not be here according to my mother’s doctors. I know mothers who did hold on until delivery. In one case, the doctors were correct and the baby only lived a short time. The mother was never sorry. In many, many cases, the baby was born perfectly normal or with far less complications than predicted. My daughter was certainly given all the complications possible in one of her pregnancies. I am so glad she did not ever think of snuffing out the life of our beautiful granddaughter. I know many do have more complications and my heart goes out to those parents.

    Life is difficult and laws always have exceptions and imperfections, but I would want to do what is the least on the side of death.

    Liked by 4 people

  11. Michelle, I heard someone say a long time ago that a prefab house was sturdy because it had to survive the trip to the site.

    As far as men and babies….
    I am sure you all remember my Mama Ruth. She had a husband-Daddy Jim. Well, he had a sister(we will call her Jane) that in the 1950s had several pregnancies. As a matter of fact, she would have a baby and show up to her 6-week check-up pregnant. Sometimes she would carry that baby to term; most times she miscarried. The doctor would scold her and tell her that her body couldn’t take this. It didn’t make a difference. The cycle continued.
    One day Jane’s husband got kidney stones. Not having another doctor, he went to the doctor who had delivered his children and treated his wife through multiple miscarriages. The doctor informed him that the pain he was experiencing was nothing like what his wife went through each time she had a baby or a miscarriage. The husband eventually passed the kidney stones. HE informed the doctor that if his wife EVER showed up pregnant again, HE would NOT be the father!!!!
    Thus ended Jane’s childbearing and miscarriages.

    Mama Ruth cackled every time she told me that story.

    Liked by 4 people

  12. My SIL had a prefab house. It was good except for where the halves met in the middle. I believe it shifted and the halves showed the stress. Houses do shift. In addition, she lived not far from an open pit mine and mine blasts shook the house. That happens at our home, too, although we just feel the windows shaking mostly. I do know other houses in that neighborhood who have had cracks in the plaster from mine blasts. At least that is what the owners think. I am sure the shaking does not help a house.

    All would depend on the quality of workmanship, I would suppose—both at the factory and the site.

    We have two neighbors with pre-fab houses. They are nice, but not as nice or well built as stick built, IMO. I would not buy one, if I had a choice. However, they sure beat a trailer home and may be better for some folks than an apartment. For a quick house in some bad circumstances it seems to be a good choice for this man.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Kim @ 10:45
    Did it end the marriage?
    I know that men know all about pregnancies.
    It is usually a male doctor who delivers babies.
    Most men know how to live with a pregnant wife.
    And most men know when to keep their mouths shut.
    😆

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I hear on the radio that it is colder in Chicago than Nome, Alaska.
    Peter and Cheryl now know how our Canadian friends feel.

    Like

  15. The eye doctor’s scheduler just called, and I am on for Feb. 5th and 19th. I took the first offer. Art said we would work it out. There are a lot of associated appointments. A lot to work out.

    I am still in shock. But praising God.

    Liked by 9 people

  16. To add to what I wrote yesterday about being grateful for the 12 years Hubby had after his cancer diagnosis: I also often express my gratitude to God for how He prepared me for Hubby’s death (not emotionally, but in practical ways) and has provided for and sustained me since then, and most of all for the sense of His presence and love with me.

    *********************
    Have I told you all the story of the Mont Blanc pen? A little over 20 years ago, Hubby secretly bought a Mont Blanc pen that was over $100, but was “on sale” for $75. (Who pays $75 for a pen!?!) He didn’t tell me about it for several months, thinking I would be angry for paying that much money for a pen. (That same pen now sells for over $400 !!!)

    Hubby was very careful not to lose that pen. He used it for signing important papers, and I guess for other things, too.

    A couple or so months after his death, the thought struck me – Where’s the Mont Blanc pen?! I looked all over his desk and didn’t find it, but finally found it in a cup on his dresser. It may sound silly, but I was so happy to find it.

    Last night, I picked up the pen, looking at how fine it looks, and almost hugging it (don’t laugh). Then I wondered why this pen means so much to me now. What I decided was that this pen represents so much of who Hubby was. One aspect of this is that this (lower) middle class working man aspired to be a classier, more refined gentleman. But another aspect is that this pen is indicative of his bad financial decisions.

    As of last night, that Mont Blanc pen is now on top of Hubby’s urn. (Although called an urn, it is really a rectangular box.) The pen is a burgundy color and matches well with the cherry wood color of the urn. (His folded glasses have been on the urn since the beginning.)

    Liked by 4 people

  17. Oh Kizzie what a sweet moment for you and thanks for sharing it with us. Many years ago our Pastor was moving and as a going away present we gave to him a Mont Blanc pen…something he had always wanted but would never purchase for himself…they are very nice pens!! And hugging that special pen isn’t silly at all. I remember finding my Dad’s watch…the one my Mother had given him before they married in 1950. That was the watch I remembere so well. He always had that on…I can still see it through a child’s eyes…and it warms my heart. My Mom gave me that watch upon his death…brings tears to my eyes, with a smile, upon seeing it now sitting over there on the desk.. I do pray that pen brings to you sweet memories of Lee… ❤️

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  18. I had a Mont Blanc pen. I miss it. It may sound silly but being left-handed some pens don’t write as well as others. That pen was perfectly balanced and made my handwriting look better than it did with any other pen. I don’t know where I got it. I just had it one day. Perhaps I took it from someone accidentally. I do know at first I didn’t realize it was an expensive pen. I left it at the bank once and the teller held it for me until the next time I was in to make a deposit. In the last 6-8 years, I lost it. Perhaps it is blessing someone else who appreciates it. I am not in the mood to pay to replace it.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. I have my dad’s two Omega watches. Mr. Naval Academy has his Rolex. Me? I used to feel I wasn’t dressed if I didn’t have a watch on. Now I check my cell phone or computer for the time. It works.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Chas @ 11:58 am- I’ve been in colder than we’re getting now. Back in January, 1982, it got down to -23°F in Kirksville, MO, where I lived at the time. The wind chill was -60°. We had a visiting evangelist from Canada, and he and the man with him joked that it felt warm. When they left Kenora, Ontario, it was -68° air temp.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Kevin- Maybe it got it’s name this way: Two Southerners were wandering the tundra, and the woman asked her man, “Do you know where we are?” He replied, “No, ma’am.” She only heard the “No m” part and presumed that was the name of the place.
    (The above is not intended to be factual.)

    Liked by 3 people

  22. I was close: According to Wikipedia, there are three origins of the name. “The third proposed origin of the name is from a misunderstanding of the local Inupiaq word for “Where at?”, Naami.”

    Like

  23. Most of you all are in the Polar Vortex. Stay warm.

    Janice, good news about the surgery appointments. Get it done asap and you’ll be driving in no time.

    What is the Super Bowl weather going to be like?

    What a sweet story, Kizzie. I’d never heard of those pens, although Carol probably has, pens are one of her “things” (though I doubt she has one that expensive).

    I see I’ve received Jo’s newsletter and will read it later, work calls for now. I slept in and had to race out of the house to get in.

    I’ve been noticing a lot of these succulents around town, they really are striking (Sticks on Fire):

    https://www.gardenia.net/plant/Euphorbia-tirucalli-Sticks-on-Fire-Fire-Sticks

    Liked by 3 people

  24. Meanwhile, Carol has been virtual shopping ahead of her payday and as of last night wanted to buy 9 pounds of English toffee from Amazon. I think I talked her down from that, but time will tell.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Hey, yeah, that’s a good question: What extremes of temperature have you experienced?

    Chicago tended not to give the “true” temperature if they could use wind chill or heat index, so I don’t know the actual thermometer reading of the coldest I’ve experienced, just that wind chill was -65. In the other direction, I’ve been in 122 twice, once in Phoenix and once in Lake Havasu City (where London Bridge is now).

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  26. Peter, when I posed the question I hadn’t looked at Wikipedia yet. The answer I had in mind was the second theory Wikipedia mentioned, which I had heard from my geographer friend.

    Allegedly a British cartographer copied an ambiguous annotation made by a British officer on a nautical chart, while on a voyage up the Bering Strait. The officer had written “? Name” next to the unnamed cape. The mapmaker misread the annotation as “C. Nome”, or Cape Nome, and used that name on his own chart; the city in turn took its name from the cape.

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  27. I still wear a watch…cannot go without it. It is an Anne Klein and there is but one place in town that can replace the battery for some reason. I pay 20 dollars every other year to have it up and running!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. I honestly don’t see (unless it’s already right in your hand) how getting the cell phone out to look at the time is quicker than a glance at your wrist. But I’m old school 🙂

    We’re all keeping up on your weather out here:

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Extreme temperatures? For me the high was around 112F when I lived in LA’s San Fernando Valley 25 years ago. It could have been that hot other times when I was growing up there but I don’t remember. My record low was here in Ann Arbor a few years ago at about -5F with -25F wind chill.

    I expect to break the cold record tomorrow. For the first time in my 23 years with my employer they have announced an office closure in advance. Everyone is expected to work from home.

    (I might have experienced colder temperatures when I was growing up in LA if I’d gone to a dog park, but we didn’t have a dog.)

    Liked by 4 people

  30. I prefer a watch, but when I need a new battery or strap I tend to not get around to it for a long time because I have the phone. It’s not as handy, but it’s handier than fixing the watch…

    Like

  31. DJ – In that comment, I had almost added, “Hubby had ‘a thing’ for pens.”

    I’ve probably mentioned this story before. Years ago, we watched a TV show called “Homicide: Life on the Street”. There was an episode in which a man killed another man in order to take his pen. When the detectives went to the murderer’s home, they found hundreds or thousands of pens all over the place. I turned to Hubby and pretended to be scared of him, as if that could be him one day. 😀

    He also had “a thing” for hats (mostly baseball cap style, but some others, too) and jackets (outerwear jackets, not suit-type jackets). And when he got interested in guns, and received his pistol permit, he bought more guns than he really needed. I think he ended up with three or four handguns, a shotgun, and a rifle. He would sometimes go target shooting with his handguns, but to my knowledge, he never shot the longer guns. In fact, they are still in the boxes they came in.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. In the last year or so of his life, Hubby repented of how he had wasted so much money, and put us into debt. (I have to admit that I struggled not to be resentful over having to be frugal with my own needs and wants while he bought whatever he wanted. He apologized to me about that, and I forgave him.)

    He would be very upset with himself. and feel awful, for leaving me to have to pay off this home loan (like a mortgage), which I will be paying each month until I am 71, unless I come into some money to pay it off quicker, or if Nightingale starts making a lot more, and I can put more of my money towards it each month. But I forgive him for that, too.

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  33. Kathaleena, it really does depend on how the “prefab” is done. Our home is brick and built in 1980–so if it were going to be “settling,” it should have done so by now. We put in new windows, flooring, and bathroom fixtures, and our next-door neighbor (who moved in after us) replaced the original kitchen cabinets. But structurally it is sound, and a very attractive unit. We didn’t know until after we moved in that they were built off-site and brought her by truck; one of our workmen, maybe the window guy, told us, because he lived in town when these were built.

    The really cool thing about this development is that the developer thought our town needed condos, and so he was not only developing condos but hoping to encourage others as well. And so he developed a really wonderful community and they are still very popular. They are on larger lots than some condos (not crammed in as tightly as possible), and each and every building is different. Each building is a four-plex; some are two-story four-plexes, and some are single-story. Younger people (with families) tend to live in the two-story ones and at least some of those have three bedrooms, but it tends to be empty nesters who lives in the single-story ones, some of them at least (like ours) two bedrooms. Most of the units have one-car garages but some (like ours) used that space for a family room. Some are brick–and different buildings have different colors of brick–and some are siding–and those too have a range of colors. One might be pale green siding with white trim, another yellow bricks with shutters, another red brick without shutters. Sizes and shapes of windows are different. Within a four-plex, all the units look the same from the outside, so the building matches (although sometimes one of the four has a family room instead of a garage, and so the door on that one will be different). Some units have colored garage doors. A few units even have fireplaces in one of the four, and a few have a slightly different basic shape. But you walk around in the development and it’s clearly a neighborhood, but it is not “cookie cutter” like so many condos. Some real creativity went into putting together more than 100 units, in two basic styles, and having each and every one be different on the outside. I’m guessing whatever factory built them also had others going other places in the country, that they were building “red brick with tan shutters, plan 60” for Indiana, and for Illinois, and for two towns in Ohio, and so forth. Then they were building “yellow and brown brick, brown shutters and garage doors, plan 61” for the same developments, and then “pale green siding, white trim, plan 62,” and so on.

    As a teenager I lived for a few years in a mobile home, and I’d never choose to do so again. They aren’t built sturdy; they are built lightweight. So you’ll need a new kitchen faucet every three years, and you’ll hear all the conversations in the home, and so forth. If you’re trying to save money to buy a house, a used mobile home can be a good choice for living space–it’s cheap, it doesn’t share walls like an apartment does, and it will have some resale value when you go to sell it. But buying a new one only makes sense if you do the math and figure out that the alternative is renting for five years and the cost of the mobile home and lot rent is cheaper than an apartment. Because it will be worth almost nothing at the end of those five years. But having lived in a mobile home, I know that this is nothing like that. But a “manufactured home” might be a lot like a mobile home. I’ve never lived in one of those.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Temperature extremes: I don’t know what the temperature was because actual numbers didn’t concern me at the time, but I was at Thule, Greenland once in the winter and spent a summer in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Fortunately, everything in Arabia was air conditioned. For us, not the Arabs.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. I had been wanting to replace the stretched out watch and on a Timex that Wesley gave me. The band costs as much as the watch so I got a new watch. Now I need to take two links from the old watch and put them on the new so one will not be as tight and the other will be tighter. I can wear them at the same time and call them parent and child watches. The leather black strap on the watch I bought last year needs to be replaced. Maybe after tax season. The watch with the pink strap is too difficult for me to read right now. The other watch I replaced the glass face on still works nicely for casual clothes.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Cheryl, I lived in an 8×35 foot house trailer for about six years. The two major problems I had with it were: 1. It settled and the doors wouldn’t work until I fixed it. Minor problem, but it always seemed to happen at the wrong time.
    2. Parts for repair were not the size that were sold in ordinary hardware stores.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Watches: I still have the Whittaker I bought at the PX in Arabia for about $50.00. It keeps time, but the spring is week and I don’t wear it much because the spring is weak and I have to keep winding it.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. (I might have experienced colder temperatures when I was growing up in LA if I’d gone to a dog park, but we didn’t have a dog.) — Kevin, you are so right.

    Carol has many dozens of pens all hooked onto her bags in long rows. She also has a thing for collecting bags. 🙂

    I think we all have our ‘collecting’ weaknesses. Clearing out my mom’s house we found many, many straw baskets (which she used for flower arranging, she had an amazing green thumb and lush gardens); with my one aunt (as we were helping her move) it was yarn — balls and ball of yarn, everywhere, waiting for a project …

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  39. Prayers for energy today appreciated as I didn’t get much sleep last night.
    Chas, after I sent out my newsletter, I thought “what about Chas?” I knew I had your email somewhere and finally found it on my phone.

    Liked by 4 people

  40. In Thule, they had a power source running constantly. Never turn it off because batteries would not start an engine at those temperatures. i.e. You couldn’t start your airplane without help.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Doses anyone care what time it is?
    When I was working, I usually didn’t care about the actual time. Except for starting and stepping time, f you think about it, you don’t either. It’s “How long until……” that maters.

    Liked by 2 people

  42. The warmest I’ve ever experienced was about 118F in Phoenix on our honeymoon.

    The coldest was -54.4F – not including the windchill. We were driving to Calgary for Christmas, I think, one year.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. I have a watch with a broken wrist band, but I never wear it because it irritates my wrist. I put it in my pocket when giving cave tours since they don’t want us having our phones. that is because the young folks don’t know when to stop using their phones.

    As for temps: 118°F growing up in Tucson and -23 in Kirksville, MO, as mentioned before.

    Like

  44. Praying for those of you getting hit with the bitter cold.

    I think the coldest was -25. I have been 120 in the Permian Basin in the ’70s.

    Busy week. They changed my work computer so they lost my wordpress password. Of course, I don’t remember it. Still works on my laptop, but when I’m on this, I should be working on school.

    Liked by 3 people

  45. Thoroughly enjoyed that rendition. Those Ukrainians can sing and play! Though the little boy did not look old enough to have heard Chicago, he did very well. Had me laughin and smilin and tappin…

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Kizzie, those guns could pay a mortgage payment or two. If you don’t want them, I would talk to someone in the know and see if you could sell them.

    Liked by 2 people

  47. I used to wear a watch, but my wrist is so small that I can’t really wear bracelets (they fall off my hand), and I had to buy watches with removable links and get some taken out, and it still would never really sit right. When I went freelance I just decided that with a clock in every room (and in the car), a watch is a luxury and I don’t need one. Now I have a cell phone, too, and I can look at that when I’m out somewhere. I kind of liked the “dressy” aspect of a watch, but it was more nuisance than it was worth for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. It’s the little things: I went to the store today and they had some sort of fruit loops cereal. Just what I needed. It is really just sugar and colored cheerios. But… next week is the 100th day of school and we always make necklaces with 100 pieces of cereal. I don’t let them eat their necklaces until they can count to 100 by 10s. It only works if you have cereal of different colors, so you change colors every then. I had already bought some plain cheerios, as that was all that the store had. So this is another right thing at the right time.

    Liked by 3 people

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