31 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 2-21-17

  1. It looks like part of a living room. Kim’s?
    God morning everyone buy Jo and Tychicus
    Sweet dreams Jo. Hi Tychicus.

    😦 It’s been a week now and I still have that song on my mind. “Six Times A Day”.
    I was listening to some tapes in my cr Sunday, and that song came up again.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Did I tell you that middle GD, Mary, is moving to Jacksonville?
    And they’re taking our great-grandsons with them.
    They already sold their house. They need to be out by the end of March.
    They haven’t even looked at houses in Florida.
    They will work things out..

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  3. Good Morning Chas and AJ….the sun is out there somewhere and should be apprearing any moment now….I love the still quiet mornings in this forest….sometimes you can hear the crunching of pine needles as the deer meander through…
    We have relatives living in the Jacksonville area Chas….my brother in law, sister in law and two of their kids and their families…it is a beautiful area of Florida….

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  4. I have been reading the Bible almost every day for over sixty years now.
    Some things I’m still not clear about.
    Paul, in Acts, announces that he is a Roman citizen. That gets him out of the predicament.
    I understand that. What I don’t understand is how he proves that he is a Roman.
    “Lemme see your driver’s license.” ???
    They just took his word for it.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. That is the “sun room” that was added to the back of my house (taking in a back porch). The china cabinet belonged to my mother in her first marriage so it was purchased sometime in 1960. In her alcoholism the table and buffet disappeared and that is all I have left. The sofa I paid too much for in 2002 and the joke is I will have to be buried in it. There is another sofa in the living room that backs up to this one with a sofa table between them.
    NOW the orchid. We moved into the house in October on 2015 and I bought it on sale at Winn Dixie to put on the entry hall table. It was blooming and after several months the blooms died. Unlike any other orchid I have ever purchased this one didn’t die and I stuck in in the sun room and occasionally gave it some water. Several weeks ago I noticed it had blooms on it. A friend, who is a master gardener, told me to give it some coffee to drink and it would help with the blooms. The above is yesterday’s photo. If AJ is industrious he can go to my FB and steal today’s photo. It is in full bloom today. The other little pods are blooms as well.
    Both of my parents were excellent gardeners and my joke has always been that I am the only known instance in the universe where two positives made a negative. Maybe I just had to grown into my abilities? I think a lot has to do with how much sun this house gets and how much sunlight comes in through the windows. The large windows across the back face east and I watch the sunrise almost every morning while drinking my own coffee. Also this house has a lot of “green” features so the inside temp doesn’t fluctuate much, that could help. It certainly isn’t because of any special talents on my end. Even my bromeliad I had on the dining room table didn’t die this year and has put of “pups”.

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  6. I have an orchid eldest son bought for me several years ago. It was blooming at the time and continued to do so for several months. Eventually, they dropped off and I sort of forgot about it until one day several months later, it had blooms again. They lasted and lasted until they fell off. It did not bloom for a year so I replanted it in a larger pot in orchid mix and it bloomed again. I send him pics of it blooming periodically and we are both pleased. It rarely gets water and is in a rather shady area surrounded by indoor fruit trees by a big south window. The temp is sometimes in the eighties and often in the forties.

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  7. My mom had a green thumb that I never inherited.

    I’ve never been to Florida but it sounds much too humid and hot for me. But I suppose for people used to the south that isn’t the case.

    This week’s stories are a preview of 2 LA City Council races for the upcoming March 7 election (I spent yesterday mostly transcribing notes from phone interviews that I’d recorded last week) and a coyote story (a researcher I’ve interviewed has released a new mobile app designed to help neighbors keep tabs on sightings but also to provide information for researchers to add to the coyote data base).

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  8. My mom was a wonderful gardener. I have killed an air fern.

    When someone pit a pick-ax through the outside & liner of our above-ground pool, Mom turned the round, grass-less area (after the pool was disposed of) into a lovely round garden.

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  9. I have an orchid that sits in the shower and is continually damp–it’s got pips coming out this spring.

    The other one is sitting and looking dead in the living room. So, you’re saying I shouldn’t just throw it away?

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  10. Chas, I did some digging into your question on Roman citizenship and how one could prove it. Recall that the Romans kept census information, so Paul, who was a citizen by birth, could have proved his citizenship using the census records of Tarsus. If there was any doubt as to his citizenship, the Jerusalem officials could send a messenger to confirm those records, but since Paul was well known in Jerusalem, there would have been many witnesses that could testify to his identity and his citizenship – the Jews would have done and did anything they could to get at Paul, but they don’t even try to question his Roman citizenship. For those, like the commander of the fortress of Antonia, who had purchased their citizenship, there are written references to and surviving examples of the diplomas which they would carry with them. The commander probably gained his citizenship after twenty-five years of military service, like these examples: http://www.livius.org/articles/objects/diploma/?

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  11. Chas, it is interesting that Paul uses his citizenship to prevent to the commander of Antonia from beating him, but he didn’t stop the rulers in Philippi from beating and imprisoning himself and Silas. It was only after the prison keeper had brought Paul and Silas into his home that Paul plays the citizenship card. I wonder if he did that to protect the prison keeper from any criticism.

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  12. Michelle, I’m reading The Black Count. I believe it was you who recommended it. Very interesting. I read The Three Musketeers a few years ago and didn’t like it at all–I got lost a lot in who was whom, didn’t care for all the swaggering and little duels, and was particularly annoyed by all the men sneaking around to have sex with other men’s wives (as a big part of the humor of the book). But this is interesting and readable.

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  13. It is an excellent day to make cinnamon rolls. The kind with the brown sugar stickiness. Do you like raisins in yours? Seventh son does not so I usually acquiesce but today, lots of raisins. I did leave three at the end for him.

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  14. My husband liked The Black Count, Cheryl. I’ve never read Dumas. But, I’m glad you’re enjoying it!

    I’m having Adorables all weekend and have been in the children’s section of the library. I’m going to try one of these Hank the cowdog books–with the Adorables. 🙂

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  15. I hate raisins in anything. The only time I ate them was when I was pregnant, had low iron and figured it was better to get it up ‘naturally.’ They did help.

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  16. My mom liked raisins on their own, but not in other things. She said they looked like bugs in other foods. I like raisins in some foods, depending on what the food is.

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  17. One of my family’s favorite recipes is flax muffins with raisins. OTOH, when I make apple crisp, I only put raisins in half the pan, as some prefer it without raisins.

    I love raisins baked or raw, whether with other things or alone. I can’t eat too many, though, or they give me a headache, especially non-organic ones, for some reason.

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  18. I have read The Three Musketeers, and two of its sequels, I>Twenty Years After, and The Man in the Iron Mask. I was uncomfortable with the Musketeers for the same reasons as Cheryl, I kind of liked Twenty Years (it has been about 20 years since I read it, so I can’t clearly remember why), and the Iron Mask was boring and depressing (Spoiler Alert: it might truly be said of that book that “Everybody dies!”). I also have read The Count of Monte Cristo which I found fascinating at the time and now shake my head over its wild improbabilities. I think the best written book of Dumas’ which I read was The Queen’s Necklace based on an actual incident involving Marie Antionette which helped to make her very unpopular. It isn’t a very lighthearted book, but its characters stick in my mind, although it has been many years since I read it. Dumas was a very flamboyant personality himself, which partly accounts for why his characters often seem unreal. If anyone wonders how an adolescent girl read all those books, the reply is that I found them on my parents bookshelves, along with Dickens, Scott, Austen, the Brontes, and other classic authors – I read everything I could lay my hands on, occasionally to my parents’ chagrin, who didn’t have the time to read everything and were not always aware of the content of books that had been given to them.

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