Our Daily Thread 12-20-14

Good Morning!

5 Days!!!! 🙂

Today’s header photo is from Kare.

*It’s now Sunday the 21st, so I believe someone has a birthday today.

Happy Birthday Linda. 🙂

______________________________________________

On this day in 1790 the first successful cotton mill in the United States began operating at Pawtucket, RI.

In 1860 South Carolina became the first state to secede from the American Union. 

In 1879 Thomas A. Edison privately demonstrated his incandescent light at Menlo Park, NJ. 

And in 1968 author John Steinbeck died at the age of 66.

______________________________________________

Quote of the Day

Christmas, my child, is love in action. Every time we love, every time we give, it’s Christmas.”

Dale Evans

______________________________________________

 This one is a request.

And this one is because I like it. From King’s College Choir

______________________________________________

Anyone have a QoD?

6,836 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 12-20-14

  1. Well, I guess I am ahead of the game in declaring we are about to hit 7000. We still have a couple hundred to go. Piece of cake!

    Like

  2. Jo – You asked Mumsee if she answers herself, too. When I am talking to myself, which I do a lot, I do often answer myself, and sometimes have an argument with myself. I even tell myself to shut up sometimes. 😀

    Like

  3. I like the trio of bright blue teapots grouped together in the room. The chrysalises and quilt squares give an added lovely touch.

    Like

  4. A tad crabby here this morning. Somebody came in to complain about somebody else and I cut them off, told them to look to their own challenges and if they did not like the other’s challenges, don’t invite them to work with you. Somebody has been using metal utensils on my non stick pans husband bought for me a couple of years ago. Big long scratches. It was not eleven year old, who does most of the child cooking so that narrows it down to the two twenties.

    Like

  5. Sorry to hear that, Mumsee. I imagine the presence of the two pregnant sisters (and the baby, too, I assume, with his mother?) could be enough to upset whatever equilibrium she may have.

    Like

  6. Actually, the pregnant one (did not bring the seven month old) is off with Tony, visiting the bio grandmother. That is the one Tina hates. Just me and nerves about turning eighteen. Everywhere she goes people make it seem as though turning eighteen is a big deal so now she thinks it is. Scary.

    Like

  7. I remember being very aware of the change in legal status from being a minor to being a legal adult when I turned 18.

    Like

  8. To me, it was just what it was and did not matter, kind of like graduating was not big deal, just what you did. But to her, she thinks she has to go out and live on her own and she knows she can’t. Scary.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Oh, that’s sad, Mumsee. Eighteen wasn’t a big deal to me. I knew it was legal adulthood, and at that point it was legal drinking age, but we were a teetotaling household, it wasn’t a presidential election year (I missed it by seven months), and 18 meant very little. I decided at about 16, though, that I would consider myself a woman at 20 and refer to myself as such. (Not that I’d go around saying “I’m a woman, I’m a woman!” but basically that I would refrain from calling myself that until I was no longer a teenager.) I really wanted to be an adult, so that decision turned 20 into a big deal, 18 not so much. It turns out that 20 was a really big year for me–I got a car, and with it the ability to get a full-time job, and also the ability to move out (and so I did). So in some ways I really did become an adult at 20, but in other ways I actually was already an adult for several years. I just understood that people don’t really see 18-year-olds as adults, so I decided to have patience and wait till I was 20.

    Like

  10. Tina wants to be treated as an adult but does not want any of the adult expectations. She does expect other people to give her a job, though she does not qualify for one. She expects to drive, though she cannot do more than one thing at a time and would panic at anything out of the ordinary. She has lots of expectations that she cannot meet. We try to treat her like a seventeen year old, but it is difficult when she acts like a six year old.

    Like

  11. I just wrote a few paragraphs, but then decided to share them one by one to help keep us going. 🙂

    Mumsee – Of course this is not the same, but that somewhat reminds me of my Chickadee (who is 27 now). She thinks of herself as an adult, but as you know, lives with the McKs.

    Like

  12. Oops. That was Kizzie. I guess I have to sign in. That’s never happened to me before, but I did some kind of cleaning to my laptop earlier, so it changed some things on me. I’ll be right back.

    Like

  13. In her case, she has too much anxiety to find a job, let alone keep one. She is not interested in driving. Like your Tina, she would panic at anything out of the ordinary.

    Like

  14. Since the McK daughters, who are adults, too, are also living at home, Chickadee can pretend she is living an adult life as she goes out with them to various places and with their friends. But she is as dependent on all of them as she would be on us if she were here.

    Like

  15. I always feel guilty when I say things like that about her (I’ve only said them here or to Nightingale). Mothers are supposed to “believe in” their children, according to our society. I “believe” and know that she is a very wonderful girl in many ways – she is very intelligent and creative, and very sweet, empathetic, and helpful. But she is not (at least for now) capable of living an actual adult life.

    Like

  16. If she lived with us, we would be helping and encouraging her to take baby steps to eventually live as an adult, as much as could be possible for her. I don’t think she is getting the help she needs where she is.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I will keep praying for wisdom and stamina for you Mumsee. With two getting ready to leave the nest, it is a daily battle. We will see if Peter Pan, a great name, actually makes it.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Peter Pan seems to be like Chickadee in that he appears to be basically living with the girlfriend and her parents off the grandparents resources. The family that never grew up.

    Like

  19. Apparently, Tina qualifies for a great deal of help. We are looking at a home in Lewiston (last choice), or if she can stay in an apartment in Nezperce with her caretakers, her needs qualify her to hire twenty four hour seven days a week caretakers. Or if we should do the same thing at home: put her and her caretakers on one side, with us on the other. Either of the last two, the caretakers would taker her to do things, cook with her, etc. Basically keep her entertained and safe. The city home would have four adults to one caretaker.

    Like

  20. We want to do what is best for her but fear we are running out of capacity to help her. If she had a care taker to prevent her from throwing things at us or hurting herself, that would work.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Mumsee – I don’t know if you meant it this way or not, but I don’t think that Chickadee is purposely taking advantage of the McKs. They are the ones that invited her to come live with them. When she was being paid to help babysit Boy, she contributed some here and there to them. She has certain chores that are hers to do in their home. If she were approved to get that SSI her therapist has her applying for, she would contribute a great deal of that.

    She had about $9000 in the bank that had come from an investment my mom had made in her name, that she received when she turned 18. Considering she talks as if she has no money, I wouldn’t be surprised if she gave that money – all at once or little by little – to them, maybe to help pay for fixing a car or buying another one. (They were always having problems with their old cars breaking down. I don’t think they tried to save enough money for a decent one.)

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.