Our Daily Thread 12-20-14

Good Morning!

5 Days!!!! 🙂

Today’s header photo is from Kare.

*It’s now Sunday the 21st, so I believe someone has a birthday today.

Happy Birthday Linda. 🙂

______________________________________________

On this day in 1790 the first successful cotton mill in the United States began operating at Pawtucket, RI.

In 1860 South Carolina became the first state to secede from the American Union. 

In 1879 Thomas A. Edison privately demonstrated his incandescent light at Menlo Park, NJ. 

And in 1968 author John Steinbeck died at the age of 66.

______________________________________________

Quote of the Day

Christmas, my child, is love in action. Every time we love, every time we give, it’s Christmas.”

Dale Evans

______________________________________________

 This one is a request.

And this one is because I like it. From King’s College Choir

______________________________________________

Anyone have a QoD?

5,415 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 12-20-14

  1. I was bold or obnoxious at school today. Another mission in this country has a rule at their school that they don’t accept students after the year begins. So the families that come have to home school until the next school year begins. It is to lessen stress on teachers, or so they say. So today I asked that they consider lessening our stress by saying that no one can enroll after the first week of term 4. When you are trying to end the year well and get several new students it can be really hard. Anyway, we have quite a few new students and I thought that I would at least mention it. Teacher burnout is a very real problem.

    Like

  2. Getting new students at the end of the year must be hard. In some ways, it may help the children settle in as they get to know the other children a bit. But our experience with foster care and adoption is that the children need to meet the new situation more than anything. So it would make sense for them to be with their folks, getting to know the area and meeting little friends in other ways. I vote with you.

    Like

  3. When we moved, which we did a few times while I was growing up, my parents’ philosophy was that it was better for the child to be dropped into a school year already in progress, and get to know his or her fellow students that way. Kind of like a sink or swim situation. They thought it would be harder for my brother and I to make friends in the summer.

    Fortunately for our teachers, we were good kids who wouldn’t give them any trouble.

    When we moved from Tennessee to Ohio, when I was in the middle of second grade, they sent me to school on moving day, and picked me up when they were ready to leave. I was told in later years, as I didn’t see it myself, that my teacher started to cry after I said goodbye and walked out. I loved Mrs. Davis, and would write her little notes telling her I loved her.

    Now that I think about it, I remember that we moved to a new town in the summer before I started high school. I was happy to find another “new girl” on the first day of school, in one of my morning classes. She and I became best friends. (And then we moved again in the middle of my sophomore year.)

    Like

  4. My dad reported moving a lot of times through his school years but four times in high school, including halfway through the senior year. But he does not view it as a negative, just as what it was. I doubt he gave teachers any problem as those boys knew to respect authority and their elders. Most of his brothers went on to become teachers.

    Like

  5. Just realized – that should have been “my brother and me” (last sentence of first paragraph), not “my brother and I”. Didn’t catch that before. 😦

    Like

  6. Along with having this different face due to the Moebius Syndrome, I was also very shy. I got picked on a lot, and bullied as well (particularly in middle and high school). I somehow would still end up with at least a couple good friends, even if it took a while.

    Like

  7. Speaking to adults, other than my parents, never happened. I could not talk to aunts or uncles even, and even though they were teachers and incredibly nice people who enjoyed children.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s