55 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 5-7-21

  1. Problem with the update on the IPad. Even if I wasn’t constantly being thwarted by Apple Spellcheck, now I don’t have a chance to see what I’m typing on the website while I’m typing. Shall I try, “ tee here,” again?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I don’t know what happened to my previous post.
    I posted it before going to breakfast almost an hour ago;.
    Not important. Just strange.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It still bugs me when I think about it.
    I taught SS for over 20 years and never dealt with the subject of “Born Again”
    I quoted it a lot, but never got into the depth of the meaning.
    That is”
    What does it mean to be “born again”?

    “Therefor if any man be in Christ Jesus, he is a new creature. Old things have passed away, all things have become new.” (I know. But I can’t find it)
    But the Bible tells us clearly that the salvation experience means that a person has a new, spiritual, body that doesn’t cease to exist when this physical body passes away. That means that Elvera is now alive and with the Lord. She will someday, along with the rest of us, receive a new physical body.
    I don'[t know if we will know each other. I hope so, recuse I want to explain to her that I really loved her, more than I can say.
    But everytime I think of that, something inside my head shouts, “She already knows”.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. John 11:26 “And he that lives and believes in me shall never die”.]
    What does that mean?
    When you reach 90+ years, that becomes important.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Good morning.

    Had a very nice time in Moscow yesterday. Sadly, for my brother and his wife, their tenants did a middle of the night move out on them. Tenants had the rent paid up and damage deposit paid and just left in the night. They had several adopted children of various ages. Anyway, the house they were renting was my childhood home from about six to grown. So, because it is now being repainted and repaired by brother and sis in law, we stopped by and got a tour of the old stomping grounds.

    The house had been built in the very early years of the town. At least before 1880’s. So it has been around a while. Plaster and lath walls. That sort of thing. They had told the tenants “no nails” but they put in a lot so the plaster was rather in disrepair. Lots of damage as one might expect around here in the early years of adoption. But they are working to bring it back.

    House sure did shrink from the time I was growing up! Same old wisteria and lilac trees. The maples are a tad bigger from when we used to climb them and read books in the branches.

    Liked by 6 people

  6. Mumsee, it is interesting to visit places you used to roam when a kid.
    I always liked to go back to Broad and King streets in Charleston. SC.
    It was amazing to me that they never changed. I used to live on the fifth floor of a four story building.
    Yes. The attic.
    The building was still there last time I visited the site
    I used to sell peanuts on the Battery (White Point)
    Five cents a bag. I got two cents for every bag.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. I drove past my childhood house last month while in Tucson to show my daughter and her cousins where their dad’s grew up. Sad to see the change, as we had a cactus garden out front with several varieties of native plants, along with a palm tree. All that’s left is that palm. I do wish I could see the inside, as my dad made some changes I never got to see.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Sorry- It must be an issue with the Brave web browser. I’m on MS Edge now and I see the posts I made that were not showing up on Brave. You can delete the 10:15-10:17 posts.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Mumsee., the house sounds lovely. And what a treat to walk down memory lane with illustrated pictures—-wisteria, lilac and maple, and even the broken plaster. It’s interesting the way things always seem so much bigger in memory, until you view them in real time. When I was 3 there was a huge lumberyard beside our apartment building in Germany. I used to sneak out of our yard and go stand between the tall stacks of freshly cut lumber. I just watched the men at work and enjoyed the smell of the wood next to my face. I went back 20 years later with Dad, and he pointed out the apartment and the place where the now defunct lumberyard had been. I couldn’t believe how tiny it was. It wasn’t any bigger than a small city building lot. I still have pleasant memories associated with the smell of lumber. Maybe that’s why I enjoy going to Lowe’s and Home Depot. :–)

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Peter, Chuck and Linda/s went back to visit the house/area in Fairfax Co. Va.
    The people who live in that house allowed them to visit the site again. The way Chuck tells it, they (present occupants) enjoyed having the visit

    Liked by 4 people

  11. Just priced tickets to Burbank from our town to attend a family surprise party next month.

    Of course, it was for two of us: $126 TOTAL.

    My husband’s only question: “How much is the rental car?”

    This is an absolutely NO FRILLS airline–as in, you get a cramped seat and a seatbelt . . . but we can’t buy the gas at that price to drive this trip, so, maybe.

    Explaining this, AVELO airlines, in case DJ wants to get away for the weekend to my house. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Debra, I used to work in the woods with my dad and brothers. The smells…. I love the woods (which is why I am growing trees on the prairie) and the hardware stores and wood stores and chopping firewood. Even the smells of a grasshopper colony bring back memories.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Peter,

    It may also have to do with server maintenance by WordPress. That’s why I posted late yesterday morning. The servers were down and I had to wait. Got a notice this AM that it’s ongoing until later today.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Nineteen still has a job. She has been working five hour shifts and will again today. But tomorrow is the start of her nine hour shifts. And it should be during a busier time. She is enjoying it for now.

    Turns out, nobody else wants to work. But I knew that from trying to hire people and husband talking to various companies (wiring, plumbing, construction, windows) and the total lack of job applicants.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Oh, and DJ, the EMT loves dogs, housesits all the time for relatives, and would enjoy attending my former church on a Sunday morning . . . just another suggestion. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Smelling fresh cut lumber reminds me of my dad. He was always building something.

    My husband stopped by a relative’s former home and the owners allowed him to visit inside. It was a nice visit for all of us, although i had no memories.

    The home I spent most of my growing years in is so unkempt compared to when my folks last lived in it. It makes me a bit sad to see it.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. I see pictures from locals on a Facebook page and someone posted several of osprey that live in a nest high on a telephone pole not too far away. There were some similar to this from someone and then several of an osprey bringing a fish to the nest. So fun to see.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. My husband pooled polar logs when he was a young boy. He earned his school clothes this way anomg other things. It was hot unpleasant work. We have a whole lot of young people who would be so much better off actually doing some type of work. I did see two young children helping their folks in a small coffee shop yesterday. This was after school hours when my husband’s group played music just outside. Children can get such a sense of satisfaction and learn some good skills in the process. I did the same working in my folk’s greenhouse business. From customer skills to watering or planting–all good things to learn and less time to make mischief.

    Liked by 4 people

  19. Chas, your selling peanuts story is one I’d never heard. You’re a man of many talents and facets.

    Peter 🙂 We were all stuck in a loop there for a while. Like being caught in a traffic circle.

    Plaster and lath, yep, sounds familiar. I’ve only had to replace my bedroom ceiling with drywall after the plaster kept giving way and falling in some heavy chunks. After several repairs to that through the years, I decided during the big house repair season it would be best to replace it (and the latest plaster-fail had left an exposed area in one corner). Workmen all marveled at the lath work in my house, though.

    Back from an early trip to pick up dog meds.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I live in my childhood home. It is both familiar and different. The interior has changed little in structure and more in paint and flooring. However, the kitchen/dining room still has the wall paper it had when I was a baby – that sounds like it would be utterly shabby, but it isn’t, just a bit weathered. The biggest change in the kitchen was taking out a partial divider that was once used to protect the fridge from the heat of the kitchen woodstove, which stopped being used years ago, and moving the fridge over to make room for the kitchen dresser that Second in-law made. I am responsible for the biggest change in the basement with my room.

    Outside, things have constantly shifted over the years. The only thing that saddens my mother and I is my father’s and Second-in-law’s penchant for tree cutting (the two men rarely agree about which trees should go). We of course understand the need to thin trees as they gain in height and girth, but the backyard view towards the forest has changed considerably in the past three years. My mother has several times put her foot down to prevent a favorite from going.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Oh, the smell of fresh cut lumber. My father built extra rooms all the way around our home except for the front. He built a big room on my best friend’s backside of their house and extended another room on a house across the street. Sawdust and lumber along with nails and hammering was a big part of our lives after my father retired from the Navy. I enjoyed visiting lumber yards, too.

    My first trip home from college was when I encountered the total shrinkage of my home. It also happened in revisiting my elementary school when older. Every time I go back down the street I grew up on, another house has been torn down to put up something new. The ones that have my father’s work in them are still there so far.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Growing up, the entire extended family loved my maternal grandparent’s home. It stood on several acres, and my grandfather had made market gardens out of the land, with avenues of trees and a greenhouse he built himself. I never saw it in its heyday, being the second youngest grandchild, but I could see the clear shadow of it. The house wasn’t a mansion, but my grandfather had built it to be hospitable, and it had been. But by the time I knew it well, the uncle who lived with my grandparents had begun his hoarding habits. Slowly the walk-in basement, that had once hosted round table ping pong matches and had a beautiful fieldstone fireplace, and the dining room, whose many leaved table had hosted dozens at one time, were being filled with stuff. Since my grandparents’ death the house has now entirely filled, with narrow paths between things. The utilities are broken down, with no heating other than a woodstove and no running water. It would be utterly condemned, but it is no longer insured. And the rest of the family hurts over the loss of what was once a place of great love and happiness. The property might be still in the family, but is no longer fit for use, a wasteland. All around it, what was once farmland and forest has been turned into housing developments and freeway links, and the landscape is no longer recognizable. My mother’s and father’s childhood homes (my mother’s family moved to their last home when she was in her teens) no longer exist. One was destroyed to make room for high rises. The other was moved to reforest the land. But in neither case does it seem as sad as the living death of the house that still stands.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. My father worked in the local lumber mill starting at age 12. It was a steam mill, and he has affectionate memories. But he also had a good deal of leisure time and hung around with the local youth. They did some constructive things together, like build a motor boat, but also destructive – my father has occasionally mentioned the time he drank an entire bottle of vodka on a date and trying marijuana (he didn’t like it). By his mid-twenties, he was a chain smoker and heavy, near alcoholic, drinker. It was coming to Christ that made the real change in his habits.

    Liked by 4 people

  24. Donna: @ 12:14
    Charleston, SC has a park down where the Cooper and Ashley rivers run together to form the Atlantic ocean. Official name is White Point gardens, but we always called it The Battery because it has guns that started the Civil War.
    When we moved there from Spartanburg in 1940, I was ten years old and I got a job selling peanuts
    Soldiers & Sailors would take their girl friends there courting. I sold them peanuts for a nickel a bag. I got two cents. I might make as much as $2.00 a night.
    I only did that a little over a year. We moved to North Charleston then.

    Liked by 4 people

  25. Not sure of the timing, Chas, but my father was in the Navy stationed at Charleston. He would have been 107 on April 30th. Perhaps y’all crossed paths? Interesting to consider.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Thanks Donna. It had the band platform in the center, but not the other things they have now. In 1940, sailors stationed in Charleston took their girls there. It was a good place for courting.

    Charleston, with Norfolk and Newport News, was a major destroyer base in 1940.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Cheryl, yesterday I was wishing for a telephoto lens as there is a pair of trumpeter swans nesting on the beaver lodge just to the north of us. So pretty, but I would not attempt to get close as they are very ‘flighty’ birds. We also have sandhill cranes nesting to the east of us out in the field by a small slough)

    Husband has planted 20 evergreens already this spring. We’re really trying to vary all the species on our property. So far we have the standard poplar and aspen, pine and spruce. We’ve added Manitoba maple, burr oak, mountain ash, apple, sour cherry, and a variety of shrubs. I still would love to have a few trees with leaves that stay purple all season.

    Michelle, I was going to ask if DJ could bring her dogs with her 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

  28. So did cheryl get a new lens?

    Dogs are extra complications right now — I’m taking Cowboy in to the vet on Monday to talk about possible tools he said he has that can help with the weak back-end issue. Just the transportation part of that trip will be difficult, and our appointment is for 8 a.m. I’ll need to get either my neighbor or maybe Real Estate Guy to help hoist him in, I think I’ll set up the “sling” that spans the front and back seats and let him ride confined there; he’s not accustomed to crates (Tess was better with that) and I don’t have one large enough for him anyway. Unfortunately, Cowboy is easily stressed by “new” things, so all of this makes it more challenging.

    But — he still seems to feel good, he’s eating well and loves-loves-loves the walks in the evening, even if they are much shorter, still has that cute, bright look on his face. I try to just walk them at their pace (Tess is a little more spry, but she’s slowed down, too, they’re both 15 which is already a pretty long run for dogs their size). Cowboy does OK as long as he’s walking forward, but standing causes him to lean and start to buckle.

    I’m feeling a little overwhelmed today — an unexpected story was thrown my way (on top of the one I’m already doing) which I’ll have to turn in Monday (so the vet appt will complicate that as well). And the tree issues, I still have questions about some of that, so after they sent me the cost breakdowns today I sent back some questions for them. And I have my own MRI of the knee coming up on Wednesday next week.

    Liked by 3 people

  29. DJ, aging dogs are hard. Keva went visiting the farm dogs down the road and got nipped in the back end for his troubles. He just doesn’t understand that he’s not as fast and nimble as he used to be. The antibiotics for the wound upset his stomach so right now he hasn’t had any meds for two days and is curled up in a ball sleeping. He’s 12 in a few months and has regular anti-inflammatory medicine for the arthritis in his back end. He sure enjoys basking in the warm sunshine and still loves to chase those squirrels.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. I’m feeling sad thinking about those aging dogs, remembering my Smokey, also remembering Misten and others.

    Chas, my dad was on a mine sweeper. I don’t know ships, but if I remember correctly, it was a smaller vessel than some others. As a family we got to go on board once. That was fun, but I do not remember much about it except for boarding.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Red maple stays a sort of burgundy all season. We haven’t got one but our neighbours do. Our ash trees are all dead or dying – the accidentally imported Emerald ash bore is doing to them what Dutch elm did to the elms. We have quite a variety of trees. Birch, pine, spruce, cedar, sugar maple, Norway maple, silver maple, oak. Our patch of the forest has mainly cedar and birch, but my father has taken to planting hardwood and pine saplings to replace aging trees. His constant harvest of the aging cedars and birch helps prevent the tangle that happens when cedars get too old – they start leaning and take several surrounding trees down with them. Deeper in the forest, in a portion owned by an absentee owner (all the forest is privately owned, but no one minds neighbours walking through their portion of land, although they don’t appreciate clueless outsiders coming in) there are places that are practically impassable, so many fallen trees are piled on top of one another. We don’t get fires mainly because the forest is so intertwined with swamp that the ground remains damp the year through.

    Like

  32. Kare, I keep a close watch on mine now, and am very careful on our walks. Life for them isn’t nearly as fun as it once was, cruising the old Jeep and walking along the ocean bluffs, visiting the ducks and turtles at our neighborhood park with a small lake, going to the dog park, in the earlier days visiting Carol and her fellow residents when she first went into assisted living and they encouraged pet visits. They were quite the hit.

    Whatever I plant needs to be drought resistant and good in this Mediterranean climate without the best soil, maybe clay like. I’ve always loved pine and would like to replace this one with another — canary variety was strongly recommended by arborist in that case, as being a good option for this area.

    They could plant a relatively tall one (10 ft??) or a shorter 6-foot version (which is cheaper and I think might be best — I think those were the 2 choices). They apparently grow relatively fast. The pine that’s there now is about 20 feet tall, but it’s been hacked down in the past (which also may have been part of its eventual demise).

    Liked by 1 person

  33. “Kid” next door has been blaring his hard-rock music off and on today from his garage, way too loud. Ugh.

    He is finally back to work (part-time) at the bakery he’s been employed at but was telling me how awful his new boss is, says she’s “mentally ill.” I told him just do your work, stay clear of any drama or personal clashes. But I don’t think that’s how he rolls 🙂

    Hopefully he’ll keep the job. He stayed out longer than he should have because he got more money that way due to the pandemic extras.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Aw, our pastor’s wife posted this for his birthday today — I’ve never heard the song but the lyrics are sweet. (she prefaced it by saying “I know no one is good ALL the time, but I like the lyrics anyway”):

    He’s a phone call to his parents
    He’s a Bible by the bed
    He’s the t-shirt that I’m wearin’
    He’s the song stuck in my head
    He’s solid and he’s steady
    Like the Allegheny runs
    He knows just where he’s goin’
    And he’s proud of where he’s from
    One of the good ones
    He’s one of the good ones
    A love me like he should one
    Like he wrote the book one
    The kind you find when you don’t even look one
    Anybody can be good once
    But he’s good all the time
    He’s one of the good ones
    And he’s all mine
    He’s one of the good ones
    You’ll know him when you see him
    By the way he looks at me
    You’d say he hung the moon
    I’d say he hung the galaxy
    Nobody does it better
    Oh, the way he pulls me in
    I’ve known a couple bad ones
    But they all led me to him
    He’s one of the good ones
    A love me like he should one
    Like he wrote the book one
    The kind you find when you don’t even look one
    Anybody can be good once
    But he’s good all the time
    He’s one of the good ones
    And he’s all mine
    He’s one of the good ones
    We should all find us one
    They’re out there, minus one
    Some of the good ones
    Yeah, I got a good one
    A love me like he should one
    Like he wrote the book one
    The kind you find when you don’t even look
    Anybody can be good once
    But he’s good all the time
    He’s one of the good ones
    And he’s all mine
    He’s one of the good ones
    And he’s all mine

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Roscuro, we’re in zone 2 so a red maple wouldn’t survive our winters, sadly. But, we still have an elm tree (here when we bought the place) and the emerald ash borer hasn’t made it this far north/west. Knowing what happened to elms and ash is what has really prompted us to plant a good variety – so that we’re never completely wiped out.

    Like

  36. The baby will always have a problem filling out a “birth place” form.
    Good evening Jo.
    Good morning everyoneelse.
    Today’s thread may be up when I return.

    Liked by 1 person

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