76 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 5-3-21

  1. I see where FoxNews has a different (new””) pretty girl this morning.
    She was in such a hurry, that she didn’t get her long blond hair behind her shoulder on the right side.
    They say the president may not permit reopening schools in September.
    Somebody is confused about this. Maybe me.
    I thought it was up to the individual governors and legislators of the states to decide that. i.e. President doesn’t have a say in this.
    I, personally, thinks that things would get normal again when we get back to it.
    i.e. I know we have a problem brought over from China. But I think we’re letting it affect us more than it should.

    Can you tell that I don’t have much to do today?
    But it’s Monday. do you know what that means?
    I don’t either.

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  2. Not sure how I made your coffee cold, hmmmm… Something doesn’t add up.

    Morning Chas, time for me to rest.
    I got an email today saying I had probably been exposed to the virus. God is good and it is in His hands. This person needed a friend, so I spent the time.

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  3. Good morning, all. Since it is Monday it means the garbage truck picked up what I left by the curb that was in their required container.

    We are His. He made us to glorify Him. It is an adventure to find a way to do that each day. My small way is to take a photo in nature (my yard most often), write a tiny haiku poem about it, and a tiny prayer of gratitude to Him. I post it to Facebook, Instagram, MeWe, and two different women’s ministry sites. If nothing else I give Him glory in that little way that goes out daily all over the world. Are there other suggestions of ways to be intentional about giving God glory?

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  4. Schools: our schools have been open for quite some time, including dropping the mask idea. We have had fewer cases than any adjoining county. The school has opened up the concerts to outsiders and sports have carried on as well as other things like 4H. The planning for the safe and sane graduation night goes on. They plan for ninth through graduates to attend. Really, it has not seemingly affected this community much though a few people have had it and even significant cases.

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  5. Mumsee: i have suspected for a long time that this “virus’ has provided lots of excuses for sloppy management and blunders.

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  6. Isolation helps.

    A woman in a Zoom prayer group with me lives in Perth, Australia.

    They had 1 case and have been open the whole time.

    Of course Perth is a long way from everywhere.

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  7. I recently heard that a lesson for students on the Constitution (grade school level) asked them if they saw what was wrong with the signatures on the bottom. Then it was pointed out that it seemed to be all white men. Did they see the signature of a Native American? Of a person of color? I am not sure how anyone would know a person’s color by their signatures. Some names give a hint, but that may not even be true as much today. I am so sorry this stuff is being taught. A travesty.

    One of my grandsons went to prom with a group of guy friends. They all wore red. white and blue patriotic suits. A couple of the guys had Trump flags and were cheered in the grand march.

    I am glad to see I can actually see what I am typing now. I cannot guarantee the spelling errors will not still show up. 😀

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  8. Chas, tell that to India. Their president claimed they had overcome the virus and held huge political rallies and allowed religious festivals to take place. Now people are dying in the streets, gasping for breath. The official death toll, which is thousands every day, isn’t counting those who die outside the hospitals, but graveyard and crematorium a are so overwhelmed that people are being cremated in parking lots. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/5/2/vote-count-in-five-indian-states-underway-amid-raging-pandemic .Tell that to Brazil, whose president called this virus a little cold, and where people suffocate in overcrowded hospitals because they ran out of oxygen. This virus has not been exaggerated. The wealthier countries have not seen as many deaths because they have money for ventilators and oxygen. A hundred years ago, ventilators didn’t exist and so people in Europe and North America died at the same rate as they did in Asia and South America. This time, ventilators kept people who would have died alive, but at a cost. Health care workers are exhausted after over a year of fighting this virus. Over a year of skeptics insisting that it isn’t really that bad and whining about precautions. The suicide rate of the general population went down this past year (contrary to claims that it would go up because of isolation) but the suicide rate among health care professionals has gone up. People can only take seeing so much suffering and death before they snap.

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  9. Morning…I hope you got to enjoy a hot cup of coffee by now Chas!
    My coffee was hot and enjoyable as I looked out upon 4 inches of fresh fallen snow this morning…it is still coming down and is supposed to snow and rain all the live long day. It is so pretty but just two days ago I was out trimming back the plants and raking pine needles. I was excited to see a tad bit of green emerging from the garden…now covered in white 😊

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  10. Mr. P is having he left knee replaced tomorrow. We will spend tonight in Pensacola because I have to teach there tonight and have him at the hospital there at 4:45 in the morning. That means that I have been busy this morning getting packed as I dress and writing out detailed instructions for Master Amos’s medication and schedule. BG is going to spend the night here tonight and I have someone coming in as soon as we leave this afternoon to clean my house. I can only do this when I have Mr. P out of the house for an extended time. For whatever reason he doesn’t like anyone to come in the house to clean. I personally cannot keep up with him, two dogs, a 3 year old and 250 real estate agents while showing and selling property myself.
    I did buy myself a treat. It’s an iRobot vacuum. Her name is Rosie from the Jetsons. I love to push clean every morning and let her clean my floors. It gives me so much satisfaction to empty the little compartment of all the “stuff”.
    This reminds me–how many of you clean before the cleaners come? I mean I can’t let anyone know what a pig sty I live in!!!!! Which reminds me…I have to go clean the top of the stove.

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  11. The virus is very dangerous for pregnant women. The hospital where I went for my operation reported a few weeks later, as our numbers increased, that it had over a dozen pregnant women in the ICU on ventilators due to the virus (our hospitals now have over 900 people in the ICU due to COVID – doctors and nurses have been pulled from all over the country where they can be spared as we do not have enough staff for that many ICU beds, never having needed that many before). The province has made pregnant women a priority to get the vaccine (over 60,000 pregnant women in the US got the vaccine, either Pfizer or Modern, without side effects) but Second’s vaccine appointment isn’t until next week. Other countries are also seeing the devastation among pregnant women: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/may/03/calamity-of-maternal-deaths-covid-concern-grows-for-brazils-pregnant

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  12. Roscuro, I don’t believe Chas was saying it is a hoax or in any way saying it is not a dangerous deadly virus, but rather that it is also opportunity for shenanigans by politicians.

    “Don’t waste a good crisis”

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  13. mumsee (11:01), that’s the distinction that needs to be clear — I will allow that some politicians, being politicians (thus we should not be surprised), managed to take advantage of some of the changes the pandemic caused and required. The reopening of schools is possibly an interesting factor here in the U.S. as it is being so vehemently opposed by some teachers’ unions. But I believe the availability of the vaccines here have caused even that battle to fade. Teachers are being vaccinated in huge numbers.

    I’m not convinced one can fake a pandemic as some suggests. Or that major changes weren’t justified in order to try to mitigate the death and illness tolls. Remember, this was an unknown virus in the early months, we had no real data or information to go on — only that hospitals were filling up with some very sick people in need of drastic, life-saving measures and many people were dying, including otherwise ‘healthy’ people. The alarm was justified.

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  14. Was Miss Bosley/ aka “Toto” during tornadoes/ with you?

    Kim, hope the knee surgery goes well.

    My, how our joints do give out with wear and tear. I really hope to avoid the whole joint replacement thing. Maybe someday they’ll figure out a way to do that less invasively? Or ways to prevent it? Hmmm. In maybe 100 years people will be forever young due to all the medical advancements?

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  15. Interesting, you never hear about elbow replacements.

    But knees and hips? Those surgeries are becoming almost routine. My cousin had a hip replacement surgery a few years ago, she’s in her 70s and very petite. I’ve heard knees are harder to recover from, though — it’s a small joint that has to bear our body’s weight. Our pastor, who’s in his mid-60s and a lifelong athlete (track, pole vaulting, beach volleyball — in his young days he went out of state to train and try out for the Olympics) has had knee issues that could also result in a replacement surgery.

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  16. Interesting that you should mention “elbow replacements”.
    I first wondered if the new elbow would obey the command to bend, as the old elbow did. Then I wondered at the phenomenon about why your elbow has to do what the brain tells it to do.
    Think about it.
    It is amazing that one part of the body is obliged to respond to what a small, insignificant in size, part of the body asks,

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  17. Mumsee, yes, the default of American culture is always to distrust authority so, especially if an authority isn’t of the right party, their motives are automatically suspect in citizens’ eyes. I don’t see that in our politicians – whether liberal or conservative they are equally blind sided and alternately doing too much or too little. The province where a pastor has been arrested for refusing to observe safety measures is a province run by a Conservative premier, a premier who was the darling of the national Conservative party – which conservative evangelicals often tout as the only party worth voting for – and even suggested as a future candidate for Prime Minister. Our province is also run by Conservatives and we are still currently in lockdown, and even traffic from neighbouring provinces is being halted. These are not federally enacted lockdowns – they are wholly within provincial jurisdiction. But, as I’veentioned before, the provincial government doesn’t want to shut down the large plants and warehouses where outbreaks are occuring. The federal government, which is currently Liberal, has been all over the map in regards to response. They have shut down cross border traffic while allowing international flights, requiring two weeks quarantine but giving exemptions to those quarantines to certain groups including international students (and outbreaks having been happening on campuses). They dropped the ball (in fairness, previous governments contributed to this as well – because apparently we didn’t need to develop our own vaccines anymore) on speeding up domestic vaccine development, but then pre-purchased enough from international vaccine producers, only to have those producers repeatedly delay delivery, which set provincial vaccine campaigns back by months. The provinces blame the federal government and the federal government blame the provinces, when really they have both messed up in certain areas, while in other areas, it really isn’t anyone’s fault. No, despite the warnings of certain relatives, I don’t see a power grab, just human incompetence and thoughtlessness from overconfidence in human technology meeting nature’s ability to produce disease.

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  18. Really? I have seen a power grab going on in this nation for a century or more, regardless of who has the power. Other countries as well. And yes, it happens on both sides: taking advantage of a crises to get things passed they would not have without it. We were warned in the seventeen hundreds that it would happen. And looking around now and historically, nothing new under the sun.

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  19. Look at the laws God put down for how we should act, compare that to what our laws look like now. Micromanage much?

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  20. The restrictions have been difficult, no doubt. But there was a lot to try to “figure out” when this new virus struck.

    I remember one of our first local deaths was of a man who worked in the production side of our newspaper operation — he was in his 70s, tall, lanky, active and well known in the community, frankly one of the healthiest 70-somethings I knew (although at certain ages there is always the possibility of underlying conditions that haven’t been necessarily diagnosed).

    He and his wife worked at the cruise terminal helping passengers in wheelchairs get on and off the ships, which is no doubt where they were exposed; both became ill. This was around St. Patrick’s Day in 2020, so very shortly after the virus arrived in the U.S. She recovered, but he took a stunning dive, bed-ridden in their home he was so incredibly sick, and within 2 days he died. They’d tried to get him to the hospital but it was mass confusion there at that point as well and paramedics either didn’t or said they couldn’t respond, I don’t recall. His body wasn’t picked up for 2 days and she was under strict quarantine also at the house; friends and relatives were bringing her food to leave on her front porch.

    A couple in our church had known them well for several years (I don’t think they were believers, but I don’t know) and have been ministering to the widow for the past year, putting her on our regular prayer list; she was completely undone by the jarring experience and the sudden and shocking loss of her husband.

    All to say this was nothing to shrug off — but the learning curve also was steep for government and all of use.

    In the U.S., of course, we already were in the midst of deep and rancorous political infighting which spilled over into how the pandemic was being handled at various stages. There were rebels on the right, self-appointed mask enforcers on the left. None of it was pretty.

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  21. Government will always seek more power, it seems to be the nature of what it is. But government is a necessary evil, if you will. And protecting the populace remains its chief purpose.

    There will be much ongoing debate on how this was handled, what worked, maybe what didn’t; what was learned from the experience. But I don’t expect the infighting to fade, Americans of all stripes have staked out their “positions” and aren’t about to be persuaded on many of these matters. Stats will be questioned and not believed; vaccines will be not trusted. But that’s where we are as a nation right now.

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  22. Mumsee, God gave those laws to Israel, not to any other nation. And the laws he gave to Israel micromanaged, oh yes they did. God mandated medical quarantine before quarantine was a word. He instituted building codes and safety laws, mandating the destruction of buildings and material that had molds and mandating parapets around their flat roofs or they would be responsible for the death or injury of anyone who fell accidentally. His purity laws were onerous, and every menstruating woman in the West is grateful that we don’t have to observe the seperation and cleansing ceremony. Micromanagement abounds in the law of Moses and Christ’s redemption of the myriads rendered unclean by that law is a wondrous relief. And no, I don’t think things have gotten worse since the 1700s. People aren’t being hung for theft anymore, and race based slavery, with all its accompanying violence and injustice, is abolished. Ecclesiastes 7:10 holds true. Every age has its injustice but in every age that injustice changes and no age has the monopoly on sin.

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  23. Roscuro, those are precise rules but are all laid out in a remarkably brief book compared to what each nation has now. But how about “Love God” and “Love your neighbor”?

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  24. Mumsee, you aren’t presented with a list of clean and unclean animals to eat. The average conservative American would rise up in rebellion if their government gave instituted the law of Moses as the basis of government. In fact, the law of Moses would violate the US Constitution, since it mandates a religion and restricts freedom of speech and assembly.

    Loving God and your neighbour is possible under any system of law, as Paul writes to the Roman believers in Romans 13. The Roman empire had its own set of laws and Paul tells the believers to obey them. The whole point of that chapter is to teach the Church that all governments are instituted by God and we are to honour and obey those earthly governments God has set us under.

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  25. Okay, trying again.

    Roscuro, my point is: God’s laws of loving Him and loving one another, are covered in one or two sentences. Our nation’s laws are written out in much more detail than the Mosaic law given to the Israelites and fill many many many more books. Nobody has time or inclination to read them all when you have just our nations laws and regulations, let alone each State’s. Our laws go into much greater detail than God’s did. Nobody even knows the number of laws we have because nobody has been able to count them all. And with new ones cropping up daily….Solomon (or the Preacher, if you prefer) might have said this: the writing of many laws is endless, and excessive devotion to regulations is wearying to the body.

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  26. Yes, Roscuro, loving God and neighbor does fit well into law and most laws are made to reiterate the same thing in millions of different ways so some legislator can feel important.

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  27. DJ, exactly, which is why I am baffled by the blame game. President Trump was told various things from the beginning, contradictory. He simply tried to find a truth that made sense and stand on it. And that changed as the evidence changed and the “science” changed. I suspect that is how most people view it. “What, of all the contradictory stuff, is most accurate so I can protect my family and others from a really nasty virus.”

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  28. Mumsee, many of the Old Testament laws did indeed micromanage–but the law system also multiplied. Remember that by the time of Jesus the religious leaders had determined how many steps you could walk on the Sabbath day. According to the Pharisees, Jesus “broke the Sabbath” by healing on it, and the man he healed broke the Sabbath by picking up his mat to carry it.

    But the Old Testament law itself said you couldn’t sow two types of seed in the same field and you couldn’t make an outfit that was part polyester and part cotton. Many normal human conditions made people unclean, and when you sinned you had to take one of your animals and sacrifice it. And God sent prophets and communicated specifically with His people, and they still rebelled. They didn’t even keep the Passover, which was a blessing to the people.

    I don’t think human nature has changed all that much. We write laws, people ignore them, and we write new laws.

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  29. I see where US troops are being pulled out of Afghanistan.
    That means that Afghanistan goes up in flames.
    But.
    To quote Otto Bismark, German ruler, “the Balkans are not worth the bones of a single Pomeranian grenadier”
    We need to get out of Afghanistan. Let them solve it.

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  30. I was thinking last night about living in a society that really only has one bad word left, and that being one bad word that is never actually said. (How many eight year-olds wonder what on earth people mean by “the n-word”?) The f-word, by contrast, has become an everyday word. We have gone from many sins to just one, racism. It’s the sin that everyone is against, but everyone tries to be even more “against” it than everyone else is. If the earth survives another fifty years, and America is still around, no one is going to be writing that 2020 America was a hotbed of racism; they’re going to be writing about it being socially acceptable to kill babies in their mothers’ wombs, to allow boys to pretend to be girls and vice versa, about sexual sin being mainstream, and about the disastrous rejection of any kind of authority in some cities. To listen to everyone talk, you would think the most prevalent sin in our culture right now is white people being racist, but it’s actually the one sin with nearly unanimous agreement that it’s wrong.

    What were slaveholders considering to be the sin of the day while they openly accepted slavery? We look at them as being so bad because of their own big obvious sin. But we ignore our own cultural sins and focus on sins that have nearly unanimous rejection already. Did they do that too? Were their leaders talking at length about sins no one approved and ignoring the culturally acceptable ones?

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  31. Mumsee, in Romans 13, God left national laws alone. The Gospel isn’t for nations to follow, it is for people within every nation to follow. I long list of laws is nothing new – the laws of the Medes and Persians could never be repealed, so their list could only get longer, never shorter. English common law, which is the basis of government in every English speaking government, has accrued hundreds of years worth of laws. Case law works like that. Someone finds a loophole in the law, so then a new law has to be rewritten in order to cover that loophole. But reread Romans 13, because what Paul is saying is that all the laws, and he is speaking in the context of a pagan Roman government, can be summed up by love God and love your neighbour as yourself. Those regulations against pollution by industry, they are to make sure that industry protected those living next to industry as the owners of those industries would want to be treated. The reason they need a law to make them do that is because the industry owners in the past showed they didn’t care about those living next to their industries. So, if they had obeyed the simple command to live their neighbour as themselves, they wouldn’t now be restricted by laws that mandate consideration if their neighbours. As Paul says, the government bears a sword to punish evildoers, and those who don’t live their neighbour as themselves always commit evil against those neighbours.

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  32. Cheryl, I begin to think that perhaps the downfall of all governments is the same: taking what is not theirs and finagling to make it theirs until people get fed up. One would think the North Koreans for example, might be getting fed up soon, if they have strength left to fight.

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  33. Mumsee, in the natural law of God as laid out in Genesis 9, someone who causes the death of another is under sentence of death. An industrial owner who pollutes and poisons the water or air of those living next to the industry causes the slow deaths of those who live there. Under God’s words, that owner is under sentence of death. The laws of the nation are actually far more lenient than God’s law of nature.

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  34. DJ, Miss Bosley was in my lap in the chair in the closet for part of the time, and the rest of the time she was on the carpeted floor nearby. I called Art to tell him and that call was interrupted by a call from Florence and that call was interrupted by a call from Karen. I think Miss Bosley was confused by all my conversations in the closet with people. Then I texted Wesley and asked for prayer. I also had a scheduled time to call someone from church right then so I called her and said we could talk later today. That’s more people than I ever talk to in twenty minutes. Miss Bosley is use to getting all my attention so no wonder she left my lap. We have continued to have more pouring rain and thunder but not so bad as that was.

    I did recently hear of someone who had knee replacement surgery one day and was out from the hospital the next day. I think I heard this through my church folks so I believe we must be getting into a new phase of easier knee replacements.

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  35. (2:56) Glad Miss Bosley was safe and sound despite the flurry of phone calls in a closet.

    I think getting out of the hospital quickly (esp during covid) is one thing, but maybe the actual recovery process is something else again? My cousin was supposed to be out overnight from her hip replacement but wound up being kept for a few days as the pain meds made her violently ill. On one of her first “walks” down the hallway she stopped in her tracks and threw up. Other cousin said you can’t take her anywhere.

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  36. Reiterating, again: God is God and He can make any laws He wants and I will not call it micromanaging. People get involved and they have “a better way to say it” and add to His laws. His laws for the Israelites were very in depth and stringent, pointing us to the fact that we will not succeed in perfection without Him doing the work. It is why we need a Savior.

    And then people decided we needed clarification. Do not kill becomes: do not run over your neighbor with a car, or a mower, or a hacksaw, or a rifle, or pollution, or or orororororororor. And still people run over their neighbor with a car, or a mower, or a hacksaw, or a rifle, or pollution, or or ororororor. Oh, but you can kill your baby. Or your grandma. Or your child with serious depression.

    I personally think we get it a little wrong. But who am I to judge.

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  37. Mumsee, specifics are needed when laws are not enforced. I have read the homicide laws in Canada’s criminal code, and it doesn’t have an exhaustive list of prohibited weapons, rather is just says something like wilfully causing death by any means, so your list of prohibited weapons is a wee bit exaggerated. But I never have come across an industry polluter whose owners were put on trial and executed for causing the deaths of their neighbours. So clarification was needed in the law for justice to be done.

    As for abortion and assisted dying, the laws had to be altered to allow for such things, reducing existing laws to give exemptions.

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  38. Here is another topic, the death penalty — the majority of current death penalty cases rely mostly or even completely on circumstantial evidence. God’s standard was high, ours, by comparison, a bit looser, opening the possibility for an innocent person to be put to death. Charles Colson once opposed the death penalty on this basis (he later changed that position).

    A question also: With today’s technology, would DNA evidence suffice as “witness” testimony?

    From the English Standard Version:

    ~ On the evidence of two witnesses or of three witnesses the one who is to die shall be put to death; a person shall not be put to death on the evidence of one witness. ~

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  39. I know it’s complicated for some. But’
    If you have to define what is meant by “thou shalt not kill, commit adultery, bear false witness,” etc. You have a different problem.

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  40. Mumsee, I agree and that is why government is needed, because God’s purpose for government is to punish the evildoers. When people do not govern themselves, and as you say, they never do, the consequence is that they need more government to control them.

    Chas, God added more detail to those first 10 commandments. The prohibition against adultery, for example, was expanded on in Leviticus 18 and 20.

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  41. I just connected two Christian Instagram friends in the UK with each other. That is gratifying. One is my online friend who has a twin to Miss Bosley. Her Charlie is a three-legged rescue cat.

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  42. In case you didn’t catch it. Charlie is the name I go by. I didn’t know my name was Charles until I joined the Air Force.
    And Chas is my computer name. It’s easier to type than Charlie. Nowhere else is Chas used.

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  43. Good to know on this Tuesday morning. Couldn’t sleep for a while last night so got up a bit later. I am not needed at school quite so early today and am letting myself go in a little later.

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  44. But see, Chas, if you’d thought about it, you could have just typed Charlie once, when you signed in the first time, and we would have to be the ones doing the work of typing “Charlie” all these years. 🙂

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  45. I have several names.

    roscuro, that was the question that was debated at one of our SS discussions. One witness, according to Deuteronomy, would not be reliable, two would be required for a death sentence.

    Eye witnesses can be wrong, of course, but both they and DNA would rise above some of the circumstantial evidence that was relied upon for many who are on Death Row.

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  46. I use Chas rather than Charlie for protection.
    You can say as much as you like about Chas.
    You hurt my feelings if you attack Charlie.

    Them’s fighting words.

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  47. Roscuro – You mentioned the rules about when a woman would be menstruating. A former pastor’s wife once remarked that she thought that the separation of the woman for a few days each month was actually a mercy for her – a little monthly break, so to speak.

    As for laws, it has been said that there are so many laws and regulations in the U.S. that probably everyone has broken a law at one time or another and not even known it. World had an article several years ago about some of those laws and regulations, and mentioned some people (including a couple business owners, I think) who were sent to prison for several years for breaking a law/regulation that they didn’t even know about, and which on the surface didn’t even seem to be wrong.

    But that does remind me of Old Testament law, too, because that showed that no person could keep the whole law at all times without slipping up (sinning).

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  48. Ah, but:

    ~ “ignorance of law excuses no one” is a legal principle holding that a person who is unaware of a law may not escape liability for violating that law simply because they were unaware of it. ~

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  49. DJ – Yeah, that is true, but not always fair.

    Chas – It is possible that they couldn’t afford a lawyer, and had a legal aid lawyer. But I don’t remember the details. I think part of the problem may have been that they were federal laws and the government wanted to make an example of someone.

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  50. Roscuro – I wasn’t taking a stand on it either way, just offering what I thought was an interesting perspective on it.

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  51. Good to know, Kim. We will be praying with and for you.

    My throat is very sore. May have to go to the clinic tomorrow.

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  52. I’ll be praying too.
    It’s time for my devotions now.
    See you folks later. Today’s thread may be up by then.

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  53. Have you ever felt the urge to do something and ignored it? I started talking to a lady in the line downstairs at Starbucks. Her husband is having surgery but he is a 30 year cardiac patient, diabetic, with renal failure. She is a retired nurse and is worried. I paid for my coffee and stepped aside while she gave her order. Suddenly I stepped forward and told her the coffee was on me. It would have been easier to pay for all of it the first time.

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