110 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 11-21-20

  1. Thanks for the comics PeterL. I saw more about Hunter Biden in them than anywhere else. Not even FoxNews tells us about the illegal skullduggery Hunter Biden is having with China. I’m certain that Hunter will escape with no penalty.

    Our country is headed into the wrong direction. I keep telling myself that at age 90, it is none of my business. I willl not see the effect. But it really bothers me to see what is hapening to us.

    And this so-called virus shutdown is making a bad thing worse.

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  2. Good morning! We are looking for a cool down this weekend, and maybe some snow. I am looking forward to thinking of something other than COVID and school.

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  3. Finally got to see Second today. She is still tired, and, as she says, grief always comes and goes. But I think it helps that she has the needs of the little ones to attend to. Tiny was present while we talked, and while she gave me a very long hug, in other respects, she was her usual funny self.

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  4. Good morning! I just received an email from a church member who is offering to deliver Thanksgiving meals to our WMU ladies who may be staying home and not seeing family for Thanksgiving. Such a kind gesture that warms my heart. And yesterday another church friend brought two giant bags of clothes for me to look through before she donates to charity. Her taste in clothing is so similar to mine. I need to do a big purge of clothes since I basically have two wardrobes, one for office attire and the other casual. I think at this stage I need to delete the office attire.

    I have considered after seeing our Governor speak on the news this a.m. what an awkward situation he is in since he was our former Secretary of State. He basically was put into the position of having to chide the man who got his former position. Awkward to the max!

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  5. Rkessler, so thankful that you are getting that well deserved break. You amaze me with what all you are involved with as do others here do, too. So many productive lives here who are helping others in a myriad of ways. Blessings to you and your family and I give thanks to God for you♡
    But saying that, it is not to make light of what those of us who are more in the role of homebodies now. We have more time to devote to prayer and though the total results are never fully recognized by our human senses, it is a priceless work of love for others. I add my thanks to those who spend time daily lifting up prayer needs. Only God recognizes the full value of that work. We should not discount ourselves and the assignments God has given to each of us.

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  6. Saturday. It’s dreary today, with possible rain and 40s, after a week of sunshine and 60s. Oh, well. It’s November, which can be the autumn version of February, except for Thanksgiving.

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  7. It will be a beautiful day here, sunny with highs around 70°. I wish I could share it with others . . . but considering the turmoil in this state right now, we need this cheerful weather to lighten the burdens.

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  8. Lots of challenges with electronics today. Have given up on the Ipad, and have shifted here to share this.

    After finishing Amos, I’ve moved over to Jeremiah (why not? Just in time for the holidays!), and read this wise comment: “False gods are always abusive.”

    Isn’t that the truth?

    Then why don’t we see it when we get caught in their sticky traps? Shouldn’t that be the first clue we are not worshipping/spending time/obeying the one true God who loves us and wants only the best?

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  9. Good morning. I am about two thirds through Jeremiah now. In fact, this morning, as I was curled up in my nice warm bed, I told God I was not interested in getting up today and hearing more of Jeremiah. He reminded me that daughter and son in law are on that road and I needed to get up and going.

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  10. I read the second chapter of 1 Peter this morning. It reminds that ” . . . The stone that the builders rejected ‐‐‐ this one has become the cornerstone . . .” referring back to Psalm 118:22. It is wonderful to see Jesus in the Old and the New Testaments, but also sad to consider how so many have continued to reject Him through the ages.

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  11. Michelle, you had asked for me to let you know what I thought of The Promised Land by Elizabeth Musser after reading it. Wow! It is a wonderful book on many levels. It has great character development, several different storylines moving along and weaving together in first person narratives. It has a very satisfying ending without loose threads. As one who enjoys travel, I think you’d enjoy its charming descriptions of places along the Camino.

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  12. I was reading Galatians 5, which we all know as ending with the fruit of the Spirit. But before that there is such a list of sinful attitudes and actions. A much longer list and very convicting.

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  13. Michelle, I loved Code Name Verity! Thanks for the suggestion.

    We are buried deep in Leviticus right now. It’s quite a hard book to read every day, but there always seems to be something to ponder over. Imagine that!

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  14. I’m reading through the Pauline epistles and I read three or four of the shorter ones yesterday (ending with 2 Thessalonians) over several sittings, including 1 and 2 Thessalonians straight through together–a real blessing to read Christ’s words through Paul.

    My husband and I had someone else do our shopping for us this week, and we had him get us a fresh (not frozen) turkey from San’s Club. I figured that would make it easier to get the neck and giblets out (my least favorite part of cooking a turkey) and it’s supposed to be better meat. We haven’t gone out to eat since February, and if it costs a little more, it costs a little more. The per-pound price is hardly exorbitant anyway ($1.19 here). My husband had read reviews from one or two who said the bird is actually partially frozen. Well, yesterday I took off the wrap, and it definitely wasn’t ready to eat, so we put it back in the fridge until today. Today it still isn’t, so now it’s back in the fridge till Monday. But I’m making the mashed potatoes and baked sweet potatoes today.

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  15. I’m dealing with some sore/pulled muscles today in my upper left leg — and the house really needs picking up and cleaning. You’d think I’d taken up playing hockey with all these muscle/knee issues I’ve had since summer, sheesh.

    Is the election over yet? I think we need the election to be over so we can just move on.

    But yes, the pandemic uptick has been a discouragement for everyone, too, right now, especially as the holidays are here. But a neighbor said to me last night “How do we really know it’s really increasing — or if they’re just saying that?” There is so much distrust right now. It’s good to question, but I’m afraid many are falling into questioning things based on very few, if any, real facts.

    Every many doing (or in this case believing with little basis in fact) what is right in their own eyes.

    And on it goes. It’s wearying.

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  16. We’re back to long lines outside stores and empty shelves here where the hoarding and panic again is taking hold — on top of the regular mass shopping for stay-at-home Thanksgivings, of course. I guess it was a madhouse at Costco the other night. I haven’t been to a store in a week now, but will have to pick up a few things at some point. Or go back to delivery and pay more.

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  17. DJ, I know it’s really increasing because people in healthcare are saying it and because I know a lot of people who have it right now, or have had it in the last month. That’s anecdotal (I can’t prove it to someone else), but it’s enough for me personally to know it. And the numbers are going way up in Indiana, and in other states too. (Though that is the part “subject to manipulation,” put those two together and yes, the numbers are going up.)

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  18. Also we are hearing of numbers going up around the world, and that is in line with the expectations of cooler weather. What I’m not hearing is large numbers of deaths, but I can’t say I’m actually tracking it in detail.

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  19. That’s what I told my neighbor’s wife, who has the same doubts that rising cases are actually occurring. It’s occurring in other countries so thinking it’s a political ploy somehow to control an election or for other nefarious purposes in the U.S. doesn’t fit that scenario — although, that said, I agree we need to beware of any political move to make even some of these restrictions extend beyond when they’re needed. But for now, I’m simply not seeing that.

    We all hate this, it’s been a long year already, and it was hoped that the holidays could be a bit more ‘normal’ (assuming more stabilized case numbers). But here we are. News of the vaccines helps, but that’s still a number of months away for the general population (although here’s hoping our front-line medical workers and nursing home patients will be able to get those first, either late this year or early next).

    I was thinking back to a year ago and how none of us then had even a notion about what was just around the corner. We wouldn’t have believed it if someone told us.

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  20. Daughter’s in health care in Idaho are definitely concerned with the increase. Entire families being hospitalized. Deaths but I don’t think they have suggested that has increased.

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  21. For Bible reading, I am making my way through Acts, again, inspired by the recent city church series in that book. You know, it is only this time I realized that the Agabus mentioned as predicting a famine, triggering the Antioch church to send relief to the Jerusalem church was the same Agabus that took Paul’s girdle and tied himself up in it, predicting that the owner of the girdle would be bound in the same way in Jerusalem. It got me thinking of the other prophets, such as Philip’s daughters, and how Acts is a direct and literal fulfillment of Joel’s prophecy of the last days, a prophecy that Peter quotes from in the opening sermon of Acts at Pentecost (Acts 2:17-21).

    For book reading, out loud, I am reading ‘Agnes Grey’, by Anne Bronte, to my mother, and ‘The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe’ to Tiny. I am always reading snatches of books personally, but most of the books I own, I have already read. So, with my birthday gift money, I did buy a brand new book to me, one by the author whose interview with World I linked to a week or so ago, Michael O’Brien. The book I got is his first, ‘Father Elijah’, an end times thriller with a difference – his mission is to convert the man suspected to be the Anti-Christ. I am about halfway through it. He is a good writer, no doubt, but perhaps a little too Catholic to please a wider audience.

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  22. It is the hospitalizations more than the deaths that have always been the concern. We cannot change the rate of death for a virus, but hospitals that are full of COVID patients cannot treat the accident or assault victims, the cancer patients, or those who suffered a life threatening emergency such as a diabetic coma, or an aneurysm, or an anaphylactic attack. Less people will survive all those everyday occurences if the hospitals cannot respond because they are full. And that makes for an uneasy, restless population. The average person does not realize how much good healthcare helps keep law and order.

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  23. And people seem to be fearful of going to the hospital or clinic for things that could be life threatening if not treated because they fear either getting exposed to covid or that the hospital is not accepting anybody but covid.

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  24. We are having lots of cases of Covid right now. I know quite a few people who have it and quite a few who have died of it. Many have it with few symptoms, too.

    I am reminded (by reading some of your posts) that I need to take my turkey out of the freezer. Thanks. 😉

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  25. AJ is the only one who had confidence in Indiana in the football pool. My husband watched the whole game, me just minutes. (I don’t understand football and don’t want to understand football.) But in spite of some errors, they managed to finish just seven points behind in a high-scoring game where IU was the visiting team. My husband said that Ohio’s quarterback acted like he had just lost his best friend, as though they had actually lost the game; it was technically a win for Ohio State, but barely. (The betting had OSU winning by 21 points, and in a much lower scoring game. No one expected IU to have 35 points and only lose by 7 points.)

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  26. I gave up keeping up with Covid a while back. My brother told me one day this week that my neighborhood was named on the radio as a current hotspot. I think that could have related to the Covid test site in my church’s parking lot.

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  27. No frozen veggies for now, though I usually have some. I have a too-small freezer to begin with. Oh, I also have a couple ice packs for any injuries 🙂

    There was a big outdoor display of poinsettias at the market today, so beautiful!

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  28. I have ‘On Reading Well’. Eldest gave it to me as Christmas gift a few years ago, just as she gave me two other of Karen Swallow Prior’s books, the autobiographical ‘Booked’, and the biography of Hannah More, ‘Fierce Convictions’. I have read them all.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Questions?
    1. Why would a moose want to lick my car?

    2. If a moose should decide to lick my car, what can I do to prevent it? Except drive away.
    3. Good morning anyhow. Sunny/cold in Greensboro this morning.
    I was reading John 20 this morning. It occurred to me for the first time ever, to wonder. It was eight days between the time Jesus revealed himself to the disciples and the appearance to Thomas. Wonder how they passed those eight days. They knew Jesus had risen, but nothing happened for a full week.

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  30. Chas:
    1. A moose would want to lick your car for the salt on it. Cars in the winter get coated with the salt that is put on the roads to melt the snow. Wild animals are always seeking out salt, which they need to help regulate their metabolisms, and will go to great lengths to find it.

    2. There is not much you can do except avoid areas where moose are likely to be. The signs were in Banff Alberta, where the highway runs through a national park. People often stop their cars to take pictures of the wildlife, giving opportunities for moose to come out of the forest and lick their cars. In other words, when stopping to take pictures, do not let the wildlife get close to your car – if you see them approaching, get back in your car and drive away before they get anywhere near. Once a moose has got near enough to start licking your car, you are going to be stuck there until the moose has got enough salt. Road salt is not the cleanest salt, so it is not good for the moose, and, like feeding geese or squirrels in a park, moose that regard cars as salt sources are going to be major nuisances.

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  31. I was going to reply to Chas before seeing Roscuro’s post that it had to be because of salt. But I did not know all about it like Roscuro. I just remembered that sometimes people put out salt blocks or licks for animals.

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  32. Morning…we have an occasional Moose in the area but I have never seen one in the 34 years of living here. I did however see one in Estes Park when on a retreat with the Pregnancy Center volunteers….he had our door blocked and we couldn’t get out so we had to retreat to the downstairs and meet there until he left! We affectionately called him “Bullwinkle”

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  33. It is not just wild animals that need the salt, of course. When we had goats and a horse, we always had to keep salt blocks for them to lick. It was as much a necessity as a water bucket and a feed trough.

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  34. We have moose around too, but I have not seen one around here yet. Someday probably unless I die first or Jesus comes first. Then I won’t care anyway.

    However, we no longer have elk in Minnesota except in Amy Klobuchar’s faulty memory.

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  35. Chas, it is available. There are many natural salt licks out there where the animals congregate. But why walk to the salt lick when the people dump it along the road? It is a big problem as it brings the big animals to the roadside where they often get hit.

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  36. Chas, there are natural salt licks where animals have dug out natural salt deposits that were close to the surface. But, in the winter, animals have to constantly dig down through ice and snow to access the salt and predators know the salt lick locations – while a full grown moose can fend off a wolf pack, it is still a hard fight for it. A car would be a much more easily accessible source and while wild animals are able to survive without easily accessible source, they will take the easy way if available – see also bird feeders.

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  37. We have moose around here and have seen them a few times. One of my children got treed by a moose when he was out elk hunting. The same one as got dive bombed by an eagle while wearing a rabbit skin hat.

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  38. One of the difficult things you learn as you mature.
    You can’t do the things you used to do.
    It’s embarrassing to watch a kid cut my grass.
    I pay hin $20.00, butit sstill makes me feel useless.

    Actually, its an easy 20 bucks. But I don’t think kids these days don’t worry about money the way I used to when I was that age.

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  39. Chas, that’s not useless to employ someone else who could use the money while you watch over your beloved.

    We chose a condo rather than a house largely to free my husband from most yard work. We don’t directly pay the men who mow our lawn, blow our leaves, and snowblow our walks, but we pay fees as a community that hires it done. It’s a blessing to the men who are making an honest living, and it’s a blessing to us to free us from chores that my husband no longer has stamina to do without completely wearing him out. And I don’t have to add it to my own chore list since I have higher priority tasks.

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  40. Think we have it bad in lesser or greater levels of being isolated?

    Here’s a family that spent more than 40 years hiding out in Siberia not seeing anyone outside their own family. (One woman born into this family after they fled to escape persecution has continued to live there past the death of all her family and is now in her seventies, but it was forty years before the family saw a human being outside their family.)

    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-russian-family-that-cut-itself-off-from-civilization-for-more-than-40-years

    Youtube has videos about them too.

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  41. I am oh so thankful I can still mow our little plot of ground. It is perfect exercise for this sixty+ year old body. But a while back I did not feel like mowing so it is a gauge for me to know how I am feeling. We have to pay about $40 to get any little thing done around here. So I am well paid when I get my exercise!😀

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  42. What Cheryl said (12:43)

    I love my gardeners, they’re fast, efficient, and usually can do extra tasks for me such as install my new water heater. I also had them clean the roof and gutters of leaves and debris last time, a chore they did in a jiffy — didn’t even need a ladder, Alberto leaped up into the large ficus tree next to the patio and, just like that, he was up on the roof with his handy leaf-blower, done in 15 minutes). Youth, strength and flexibility — and a willingness to work.

    I have other work to do every day, for my own pay, and I’m more than happy to pass some of that money on to them for what they do every month.

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  43. I love the wildlife conversation today! With a husband that is a game warden (park warden) I have so many wildlife stories, but I love reading others. Husband has also worked in Jasper Nat. Park and we have traveled that highway often.

    There is a salt lick on the gravel road that I travel to work (when I’m working) and the whitetail deer lick it right down into a pot hole. The grader comes by and smooths it all out and the deer are back digging it out again and a pot hole has formed by the next day 🙂

    I remember my older cousins on their dairy farm chipping chunks off the cows’ salt lick for all of use to lick – memories.

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  44. Now that is reminding me where I may have seen a salt lick. We have a wildlife area not far away, the Yellow River Game Ranch. It has a lot of deer there. Maybe it could be there that I saw one, but I think it was when I was much younger.

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  45. I pick the Gamecocks to beat Ga. Bulldogs next Sat. 24-21

    Be thinking about it. I am going to challenge everyone, starting tomorrow,, to tell us something you are thankful for. at least one, each day.
    It can be repeated/duplicated. i.e. I suspect most of you agree with my thankfulness to God about my salvation, born in USA, etc.
    But you may have something unique. i.e. I am thankful that Bobby Murray talked me into joining the AF with him.

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  46. I’ve been having technical issues all weekend–particularly with Zoom–but Mr. Tech has come in and I’ve got a Zoom meeting scheduled for tomorrow, Monday November 23 at 4 pm, California time.

    I’m sorry, DJ and Roscuro. All you people on the East Coast need to tell me how late you can join us!

    Contact me if you don’t get your invitation.

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  47. There was a story several years ago about moose in Maine dying unnatural deaths from dehydration. For some reason, they were being “targeted” by mosquitoes–or they were unusually bad that year–and were dying from all the mosquito bites.

    I read it in the NYTimes. It must have been true. 🙂

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  48. We’re getting some coastal fog here this afternoon, I drove over the harbor and the new bridge was shrouded, as were the tops of all the cranes.

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  49. I remember the show, but didn’t watch it. Probably something on another channel one of us preferred? Those were the days it was not so easy to tape record. Not so many channels either.

    I am glad that my husband can still remove the snow. I will not be able to until my shoulder heals. Raking was no problem, but shoveling is different. Even contemplating getting the turkey ready makes my shoulder hurt. That is when it is so nice to have two of us. Team work! I would not mind if we had someone hired to do it, though. Less concern for the future in some ways.

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  50. When we were in Colorado our friends took us to Rocky Mountain National Park. We saw both elk and moose. They said in all their trips there they had never seen moose. Awesome sight. Maybe I’ll send AJ a few of the photos.

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  51. I remember that show and may have watched it once or twice but not recalling details of the show. It has been windy and cold around here and I have been feeling a bit “off” physically. Headache, dizzy and tingly sinus. No fever or aches but just off. Could be the front coming in…I always feel the effects of the drop in barometric pressure, plus I awakened at 2 this morning…it’s been a long day!

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  52. I’ve seen a lot of moose, elk and deer in my life, along with bears (black and grizzly), wolves, coyotes, foxes and lynx. Oh and antelope…and bison. I have been very blessed to live in some of the most beautiful places in the world.

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  53. My brother told me that there were salt licks on our grandparent’s farm. He also said some people use salt licks in deer hunting to attract deer to an area. He also said some people plant clover or rye for that purpose. Then he said his garden could be used that way since he often finds deer munching on his garden plants.

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  54. Bad news for our area announced this evening:

    L.A. County suspends outdoor dining at restaurants as coronavirus surges

    (from LA Times): In a devastating blow to Los Angeles’ struggling restaurant and hospitality industry, L.A. County public health officials on Sunday announced they will suspend outdoor dining at restaurants amid a surge of new coronavirus cases.

    Few segments of Southern California’s economy have been hit harder by the pandemic than the once-booming dining world, with many landmark establishments closing in recent months and many more on the brink. After they were forced to shut indoor dining rooms in the spring, many eateries got a lifeline when officials allowed them to serve outdoors, often in patios and makeshift dining halls set up in parking lots, sidewalks and streets.

    The new rule takes effect at 10 p.m. Wednesday and restricts restaurants — along with breweries, wineries and bars — to takeout and delivery only for the first time since May. It will remain in place for at least three weeks, officials said. Wineries and breweries can continue retail operations.

    “The persistent high number of cases requires additional safety measures that limit mixing in settings where people are not wearing masks,” Barbara Ferrer, the Los Angeles County health director, said in a statement.

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