Our Daily Thread 6-17-20

Good Morning!

Today is Wednesday. 🙂

The header is from Kare

So yeah, real life Kare Bears. 🙂

———–

Anyone have a QoD?

80 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 6-17-20

  1. From a news thread

    “The breakfast brand Aunt Jemima is removing its logo and will be renamed, amid public outcry that the branding perpetuated a racist stereotype, its parent company said Wednesday.”

    Aunt Jemima has been around at least 90 years. suddenly it’s all wrong.
    It’s always something for the agitators.

    I’ll admit. There was a time when racism was a big factor. But the fighters of racism have run out of issues.
    So? Create one.

    There will always be an issue.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. tucker Carlson is correct. but he’s alone in this.
    There are powerful people opposed to him.
    A large majority don’t want to get involved.
    A lot of people agree with him but don’t want to enter the fray.

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  3. Maybe if they made them both LGBTQXYZ they could stay on the logos. Wouldn’t want to offend the minority, would we?

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  4. Phos. I don’t care a bit if they change Aunt Jemima.
    It just appears that they are running out of issues.
    That is what concerns me. There has to be an issue.

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  5. It doesn’t matter if they want to remove the brand. The problem is when they are forced to remove it. Just like with the native American woman who was being honored on the Land of Lakes brand. It is a bully mob that is let loose. Discussion is good, but what is going on is way beyond that. It is dangerous, because it marches on and expands to do worse.

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  6. Reading in Luke this morning. In Chapter 4, Jesus heals Peter’s mother-in-law. In chapter 5, He calls Peter to follow Him. Was Peter part of the “them” whom the mother in law served? Did Jesus know the mother in law prior to meeting up with Peter? Small thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. More wild life that is fun to see at a distance. We do have a site relatively near us where you can be on a platform next to lots of black bears. There is a bus that will take you in around the evening feeding time and leave you right by steps to a viewing platform. We have taken one of our grandsons there. When I was a child my dad would takes us to a dump near my grandparent’s cabin to see the bear’s evening meal. That would be a no-no today, I imagine.

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  8. An abrupt change of subject. It ought to be legal to hit your husband on the back of the head with your grandmother’s frying pan!
    He has complained for FIVE weeks of pain in the surgical area. Sunday he called me in to the bathroom. It was bleeding. Yesterday he had a follow up with the pain clinic and the guy who programs the stimulator. When the nurse saw his back her eyes got wide and she made an ugly face. She was a surgical nurse for 15 years before this clinic. When the doctor came in and saw it, she said he needed to go back to see the surgeon that it wasn’t right. Oh, and he was running a slight fever, that he claimed was normal for him.
    Now he has his choice between seeing the surgeon tomorrow or next Tuesday. Because he will have Little Miss tomorrow and I teach tomorrow night AND told him we would work something out, he chose to go next TUESDAY. It something isn’t right and you have complained for 5 weeks and the doctor can see you tomorrow TAKE THE APPOINTMENT!!!!
    He didn’t see the faces of the doctor and nurse yesterday–they are supposed to be calm, not get wide-eyed and make faces.

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  9. I told you yesterday, they are erasing history. It’s almost like gaslighting. Everything you “know” is wrong and you are wrong and if YOU don’t admit you are wrong then you are bad, crazy, etc, and then you start questioning yourself and don’t trust was you know to be true.

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  10. I am reading in Matthew and just read when Peter’s MIL was healed and then got up to serve Jesus. It is important to realize that all things are not in chronological order in the bible books. Also, that different things are stressed in each gospel. I was so aware of all that Matthew leaves out of his accounts of the same stories told in the other gospels. He had a purpose and left out many details when they were not important to his message. All the gospel writers did that. I also found it interesting (today) that the apostles were listed in groups of two. Some were brothers. Why the others in these groups. Were they in these groups when they went out two by two? Did they come to Jesus together or one invite the other? So many questions. Not all are important. John told us the whole world could not hold the book if he told all the stories.

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  11. Black lives matter, indeed. As do all others. I have been looking at their website and it tells people to report any suspicious comments, as this will be.

    Two things are curious to me: they suggest that all lives are equally important, to which I agree, but then there is no mention of the white lives killed by police or the black lives taken by blacks. So it appears they are making more of the blacks killed by police than the others. And we know the statisics on what planned parenthood has done to the black community. What about the babies?

    And they are saying: We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

    That seems extremely limiting to me. One can never leave the village if that is your entire support system. So if a better job is down the road, you cannot go for it. There is no mention of fathers (parents but not fathers) though mothers are mentioned. A couple together can take the family and go to the jobs. And I won’t talk about the dearth of fathers involved in the incarcerated set.

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  12. K – There have been concerns expressed about the brand for a while, as I can find articles on it from several years back. There was even a lawsuit brought by descendants of Nancy Green several years ago – it got thrown out. Companies do not change a brand until it becomes more of a liability than an asset. The Aunt Jemima brand is owned by Quaker Oats, and Quaker Oats is owned by PepsiCo. About 10 companies control nearly all food brands in North America, and PepsiCo is among the top five, after Nestle and Coca Cola, both of whom continue to dominate the market despite continual criticism regarding their treatment of factory workers in developing nations and unethical marketing to vulnerable populations (see Nestle’s formula scandal in Africa, or Coke’s factory in Guatemala). When these food monopolies decide to change a brand, they are not being intimidated by a mob, as they are far more powerful than any activist group, they are conducting business as usual.

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  13. Kim, you’re right. He should take the appointement for tomorrow.

    And, yes, the changing of syrup labels, who cares. It’s the way everything is now becoming swept up in something of a frenzy to cleanse the landscape by force.

    I had an eye-opening texting session last night with one of my best friends from college years and he’s absolutely convinced that “nothing’s” happening here, Joe is a centrist, all is well, it’ll all return to business as usual, politically. Just like it all did after 1968. The youngsters are only restless, it will all pass and be good again when Trump and the conservatives get moved on out and Uncle Joe comes in. (He also is a non-believer and clearly still has his feet planted squarely on that falsehood; so he refuses/fails to consider anything “bigger” might be going on here).

    I just was shaking my head by the end of the conversation. Disturbing.

    Anyway, a syrup brand label isn’t (really) the issue at all, of course.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Businesses and corporations move as needed, and this one will be no different. They’re smart and there’s money to be made and not lost if at all possible.

    No one’s shocked, or even upset. We’ll all still buy the syrup.

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  15. I won’t, but then my family never has. The only time we had Aunt Jemima brand in our house was because someone who was moving from the neighborhood emptied out their pantry into ours. I do not think we ever used it. Maple syrup tastes far better and we make our pancakes from scratch.

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  16. Why do 10 companies own all the brands? That’s a lot of power in very few hands. Is that really a good idea?

    But more importantly, how DID you get that close to the bears, Kare?! And what kind of bear is it? It looks bigger than the one I met on the Appalachian trail many years ago. :–)

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  17. On a lighter note, the other day Kizzie’s description of her lane and her neighbors reminded me of something funny. We live out in farm country with just one house on either side of ours. Last summer, coincidentally, both of those houses sold to new owners. Son said, “I’m going to tell them there’s an HOA fee of $300 a year; $500 if they want to use the pool.”

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  18. I would imagine that Mr. P is scared. He knows that something is wrong and is afraid to find out. He will put it off as long as he can.
    Fear can make you do bad things.

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  19. Debra, the power of Capitalism? No one in my family thinks it is a good idea. My second brother in-law has worked in more than one food processing plant over his working life, and doesn’t have much good to say about them. But these companies are the Disney of the food world, buying up all profitable franchises to increase their bottom line. We used to buy the Christie Premium Whole Wheat cracker brand. Then one day, we noticed something odd, the crackers were thinners, tougher to bite into, and tasted like they had been made out of rancid wheat. In fact, more than than one kind of Christie cracker brand (Triscuit, Ritz, etc.) changed their taste and texture. We did some research, and found others complaining of the same thing. Christie was originally a Canadian brand, then it became the Canadian division of Nabisco, which is now owned by Mondelez International, the new name for Kraft Snack Foods, a division of the Kraft Heinz Company, another top 10 food company. At least, it was in 2017, with over 110 billion. Since then, its brands, particularly Kraft and Oscar Mayer, have taken a huge hit. The Kraft Heinz merger was done by the infamous 3G Brazilian investment firm, whose playbook has been to acquire successful brands, and then milk them by cutting costs: https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/27/kraft-heinz-exhibit-a-for-iconic-brands-at-risk-of-losing-relevance.html. The decrease in quality of the crackers was undoubtedly one of those cost cutting measures.

    Canadians are familiar with the technique, as the iconic Tim Hortons brand suffered the same loss in quality after 3G acquired it. Canadians still go to Tim Hortons, but more are saying that MacDonald’s coffee tastes better, and it should, since MacDonald’s bought the coffee that Tim Hortons used to sell. Canadians tend to notice things like that. The Heinz brand took a hit after it moved its tomato processing for ketchup from southern Ontario (Second in-law actually worked there at one point, and blamed it on poor management) and moved it to Mexico. The French’s brand capitalized on the anger over the move by pointing out its ketchup was made with Canadian tomatoes, and increased its market share.

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  20. I am reporting in to say that I am completely overwhelmed by my micro biology and chemistry classes. I understand the micro, but have so many assignments in a week that I am behind and I still don’t have a grasp of the formulas in chemistry.

    Kim, I was commenting the other day that it would be a sad day when we stop wearing masks all the time at work because them we will have to go back to controlling our expressions when patients say and do boneheaded things.

    Black bears are out in force in Ruidoso now with it being so dry. Thus all of the semi bear proof dumpster.

    Liked by 4 people

  21. RKessler, praying. I know what it feels like to have too many assignments, and I struggled to grasp the formulas in statistics. What helped me was an Idiot’s guide to statistics. Maybe one of those for chemistry might help.

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  22. Husband is guessing they are black bears…but I told him they were brown. His assertion is black bears can be brown…my blonde head is begging to differ 😊
    Rk… 😂 I told my friend I need a mask for my eyes so others cannot see my eyes roll 🙄

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  23. Roscuro, I hadn’t had Triscuits or Wheat Thins in years, and when I had them a year or two ago, I didn’t really like them anymore, and assumed my tastes had changed.

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  24. Yep, they’re black bears. Brown bears and grizzly bears are the same thing, and those aren’t grizzlies. Quite cute! I’ve only seen bears in the Smokies, though I have seen some on each visit.

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  25. Yes, those are black bears, just the brown colouring. We had one black bear mama with three cubs; one blonde, one cinnamon, one black. I called them the ombre cubs.

    My husband took the picture at a trailhead in PANP from his warden truck. Isn’t she a beautiful bear? There is an abundance of bears this year again and he sees them all the time. He was probably about 20 feet away. I should send in a few more of the pictures – the were messing with the sign post with the closed due to COVID-19 sign on it.

    These bears were a few miles from our place, but there is a mama bear with one cub seen close to our place.

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  26. A lady in my Word Weavers group does not eat wheat any more. She says that it is now harvested by killing the roots with Roundup. I have not researched this, but I have found a lot of cereal is GMO so I would assume crackers are, too. I am trying to do a simple foods diet so we don’t ingest whatever is put in food to bulk it up and give more weight to increase profit.

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  27. I am so sorry to hear that about Mr. P. I will be praying. Right now I am praying.

    If the frying pan works, Kim, I have a few guys I could use it on. Like when my brother said he’d be by this Saturday while on the phone with Wesley, Art, and me. Art said, “Fine.” Then I had to say I had said two weeks after he had been to two events where he could have been exposed to Covid (a funeral and the family reunion). I am the one who will have to care for these fellows if they get sick. They just want to do what they want to do in the moment without regard to consequences. But Wesley is being diligent not to be exposed. I appreciate him so much.

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  28. Roscuro @11:39 Trying to determine the ownership of many companies is often very difficult. I find that I am steering clear of big brands as much as possible and buying local when possible.

    Re masks, I have been wearing them 6 days a week at work for 3 months now. I sometimes have trouble breathing but the benefits outweigh the difficulty most of the time. The benefits include being able to sing, pray and occasionally have a good cry in relative privacy, especially when the the outfit is augmented with earplugs for loud noise and glasses which I can fog at will. :–)

    Debra

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  29. RK, Chemistry is the only course I have failed.
    I never could get valiances straight. Seems to me they should be the same regardless of how they are mixed.
    You can’t let an element choose what valiance it wants to be.

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  30. Janice, genetically modified wheat has not been authorized to grow in any country, and this is something that I know is carefully monitored here by Health Canada. The technique of spraying Roundup to speed up ripening of bean crops to be harvested is one that I am aware of – I worked for a farmer selling sweet corn corn for two summers and they did that with a bean crops they were growing in the field next to the stand – but I have never seen it done with wheat. Basically, the plant rapidly matures and dies, as the glycosylate in the Roundup triggers rapid plant growth (like a plant steroid). Because Canadian planting seasons are so short, the technique is used to shorten the ripening time, but if not done at the right moment, it simply ruins the crop. Not something to do if it is unnecessary.

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  31. Something I posted on Facebook about white privilege:
    “When I was in my last year of school at Georgia State University in downtown Atlanta I became a co-op student with IRS, also in downtown. One other student was hired, Harold, a black male. One day we decided to go out to lunch as colleagues, not a romantic thing at all. I was shocked at the looks we got, a young white female walking down the sidewalk with a young black male. It had never crossed my mind that I was crossing an invisible barrier by doing that. It was a terribly yucky feeling, not from being with Harold, but from the looks we got. That is white privilege that I had never seen those looks before. That was in the mid seventies.

    Backing up to when I applied for the position, I was highly qualified. The IRS personnel director was a black female. I think she was hopeful to fill the position with minority students. I was not hearing back about the position so I called and left messages. Still no answer. The day the job began I showed up not knowing if I had been hired. That initiative on my part and because no one else had wanted the position got me the job. I did not feel wanted, but I understood it was the times I lived in and people were making an effort to make right the wrongs of the past. We have been paying in many ways for many years. May God help us all.
    In that case I suppose my white privilege would have been not getting a gruesome job of being a tax auitor that no one else wanted to do!”

    Liked by 1 person

  32. It is the cereals containing corn that are GMO. I meant to qualify that. Raisin Bran is one which surprised me. I have a big double box of that which came from Sam’s.

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  33. Janice, your 3:20, killing roots with an insecticide wouldn’t work, and it wouldn’t harvest a crop. So wherever she got that information, it doesn’t make sense and therefore isn’t true.

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  34. GMO wheat has been found in various places in the US, including growing wild. It is a curiosity how it came to be. Monsanto was experimenting with it but stopped years ago.

    Some farmers do use Roundup to hasten the wheat harvest in areas or years where the weather is not cooperating. Just like growing wheat all the same height helps with harvest, so does getting it all ripe at the same time.

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  35. I’m sorry, obviously Roundup is an herbicide and not a pesticide, but it still wouldn’t work as a way to harvest a crop. The idea of harvesting is to separate the crop from the plant, not to yank up the plant. It would be an inefficient and unhelpful way to harvest.

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  36. Growing up in a rural farming area, I learned to not only tell one kind of crop from another, but also the stages of each crop. You can tell if a crop has been ripened artificially – it changes colour too rapidly and too uniformally. A naturally ripening crop changes gradually, and patches will still be green, while others will have turned brown. One reason for not seeing wheat crops ripened prematurely around here is probably the fact that winter wheat is grown. Winter wheat is planted in the autumn, and gas a short period of growth before the frost kills its shoots. It lies dormant over winter, and then begins growing once the soil warms up enough in spring. It is ripened and harvested by the end of August, plenty of time for our short growing season, so no need to spray it with glycosylate to ripen. As my farming friends often have pointed out, Roundup ain’t cheap, so it is not worth while financially to use if it is not needed.

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  37. Roscuro, I am just saying that it is out there. Whether accidental or intentional, it is there. And it shows up. Yes, it is pursued.

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  38. Janice, yes, a great deal of corn, particularly field corn, is GM. But there again, my farming friends have said the cost of using patented GM crops can be prohibitive. They did not. Canadian farmers do not receive the same subsidies for their crops as US farming does – a very contentious issue here for free trade, as the lack of subsidies makes it harder for them to be competitive.

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  39. Roundup ready crops are available, with what being in the pipeline. Genetically modified to be resistant to Roundup so it can be sprayed on the weeds without affecting the crop.

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  40. But, if a crop is Roundup ready, which is something that has been around for many years now, it will not respond to Roundup being sprayed to artificially ripen it. So, as long as a crop needs to be artificially ripened, it is not within the farmer’s interest to purchase Roundup resistant seed.

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  41. Obviously, farmers would not use roundup on roundup ready wheat. But they would on non ready if a section was not ripening and needed to be ripened. Kind of like we might disturb tomato roots.

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  42. Mumsee, I said Roundup ready crops have been around for years. Roundup ready corn and soybeans have been available for quite a while. For so long, in fact, that a few years ago my farming friends mentioned that the patent Monsanto had on Roundup ready soybeans was expiring – Google says the patent expired in 2015.

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  43. Mumsee @ 10:12- Our pastor said that when Jesus called the apostles he had actually known them prior. So he most likely knew Peter already. As someone mentioned, some of the Gospel writers did not write in chronological order. In Mark 1, for instance, we see the same story, but it comes after Jesus had called them.

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  44. Ah. That use of Roundup makes more sense, though it still doesn’t sound a lot healthier for the consumer. In our previous home we lived in front of a farm field, and we always went inside (and called Misten in) if they were out spraying anything.

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  45. My local muskrat is back, first time I’ve seen it in 2020. They did some work on the crossing two blocks down, which included work in the creek itself. (Basically you couldn’t cross the main street from our side of the street, but had to cross the other street; they put a bit of a bridge over the creek, which provides a place to cross, but they also did some structural work within the creek.) I saw my first muskrat of the year in the next block a couple of weeks ago, which gave me hopes I’d see one closer to home soon, and this afternoon it was there.

    Muskrats usually keep right on with their activities when a person is standing a few yards away, so they are nice to have as animal neighbors. I’d missed those little guys! I don’t generally see them in winter, so it’s been well over half a year since I’ve seen the local ones.

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  46. Not talking about Peter’s 7:03. I was writing while Peter was saying that.
    It’s a complicated issue, but not important to me.

    We know that a couple of the gospels (can’t research it now, so this is not specific. But generally…) A couple of the disciples were disciples of John until Jesus was baptized. Mark was likely the first Gospel written. It is brief and (I think) was written with Jesus’ ministry starting after John’s imprisonment. But we know that it started before that. Luke writes his gospel for someone we don’t know. But he tells it as he heard it. They is why he has more events including women. And more specifically, Mary.
    John devotes almost a third of his gospel to the last two weeks of Jesus” ministry.
    Taken together, we get a good, but not complete, picture.
    But we have all we need to know.
    I would like to read about Jesus’ childhood. I presume he was a regular kid. Shhooting hoops (whatever) with is brothers.

    I wish I had time to deal with this more accurately and completely.

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  47. My mother tells of the time she met the latest Betty Crocker. Betty has evolved over the years with new Betty Crockers. I don’t suppose she will have to be dropped, but who knows?

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  48. And when I moved out on my own I remember buying the updated new version of the old classic, it seemed important to have one, even in the 1970s. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  49. Mine fell apart, but I have a new one now that someone else didn’t want. When I made lasagna in Ukarumpa, I did a web search for Betty Crocker lasagna. It is the best.

    Liked by 1 person

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