115 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 5-2-20

  1. Good morning all. Though it does feel rather strange to say good morning when it is not yet 9:30 on Friday evening. May this be a blessed weekend for all.

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  2. Good Morning. Little Miss has a
    Rough night. She refused dinner, fell asleep early then awoke around 10 hungry. She and Papa squared off about her dinner she hadn’t eaten with him finally giving in and letting her have a nutrigrain bar. They are still asleep.
    It is really cool out this morning so I have the back doors open listening to the birds. That has been one of the blessings of this whole stay at home. The lack of noise.

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  3. Morning! The moths have invaded our area and they keep the outside motion lights on all night long…I need someone to assist in killing them…anyone? 😂 (And when they get inside the house it just drives us nuts..maybe we need to get a cat!)

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  4. So, Little Miss was misbehaving and out of nowhere I told her she was being a “ring-tailed tooter”. Where did that come from? Well, BG’s Pop (paternal grandfather) used to say that to her. So that sent me on a search for what a ring-tailed tooter was and I found this blog post:
    https://www.deludeddiva.com/tag/ring-tailed-tooter

    Which got me to thinking about other words and sayings. We are losing many of our colloquialisms. If I could go back and change anything I would have gotten my degree in Modern Language and Linguistics and then studied language and how it has changed.
    Now I am going to go check on my Little Ring Tailed Tooter and feed her French Toast.

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  5. Birds singing up the dawn. I’ve been awake since 3:45. Listened in the dark to David Guzik on Matthew 26. Did you remember Jesus ended the Passover dinner by singing a hymn with the guys?

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  6. Just finished our weekly men’s prayer time via Zoom. I had really missed it. We had a stretch without it since we couldn’t meet, but I got the Pastor to set us up on the church Zoom account for a recurring weekly meeting. Now we’re back at it for a couple of weeks, and I’m really happy about that. Thanking God for technology this AM, and for the chance to meet with the other men for fellowship, to pray for and lift up others, and to praise God for his many blessings. 🙂

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  7. Good morning. The grands are up and ready to head to Ruidoso to spend the day with their mom. We made egg mcmuffins for them to eat on the road. I received the schedule for the track (our summer job) last night. Looks like Miguel will be working full time. I think it will be good for him mentally to do that.

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  8. Nancyjil- DJ might be the one to call for those moths. She has practice at killing flying insects. Just be ready for PETA to protest in front of your house.

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  9. Peter as we were sitting in the living room having our coffee this morning we watched the birds dive bombing the front porch for their breakfast! Hoping they have their tummies full of moths!! 😊 Dj does seem to be quite an assassin of bugs…I may need to bring her to Colorado before this is all over and done!
    Kim I love that endearing moniker for little miss! I have often wondered about something my Mother always said to us. After having supper (she never called it dinner) she would assign one of us girls to “red up the table”…meaning cleaning it off. I have searched and searched of the meaning and never have discovered anyone’s using that phrase.

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  10. A lot of those sayings ar local. Elvera, when she wants to say something is fast, she says,
    Faster then 40 going north”
    That has no significance to any of you. Me neither. But her dad used to work on the Railroad and (I presume) 40 was a train leaving the station, piking up speed.

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  11. The restaurant where our church’s men’s monthly breakfast took placed has closed. The owner decided to retire with all the Corona virus hoopla. She is selling the place, so perhaps someone else will eventually reopen it.

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  12. I could send my cat over. She’s killed everything alive in my back yard, including the moths.

    She just won’t do anything about the ants!

    HOWEVER! Triumph! I haven’t seen an ant in 18 hours! The 52-day siege my finally have lifted!

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  13. Oh thanks for the link Kim! My husband thought me to be daft upon hearing me say that for the first time after we were married. I could find no explanation other than “well my Mom said it” so he had never changed his opinion of me on that front in all these years! 😂
    These miller moths are worse than ever this year and it has just begun. Every April thru June we are inundated with them as they make their way to the mountains.

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  14. The weather could not be more beautiful for the fly over by the Blue Angels and Thinderbirds to roar out a giant thanks to Atlanta healthcare workers. We are blessed considering all the storms we’ve experienced lately.

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  15. My refrigerator is fixing itself. The temps are nearly back down to normal in both the freezer and regular refrigerator this morning.

    My dad, who grew up on a farm in Iowa, always referred to the northernmost fenced off portion of our backyard to the “North 40.”

    I was thinking of going to the Apple store today to see if they could get my (shared phone) messages back on the computer. I’ve had off-and-on problems with that but it had been working wonderfully for the last several months and made messaging during work days so much easier than thumb typing on the phone.

    But there was an automatic update on my computer the other night and now I can’t get the message function back. I’ve googled it but nothing seems to work.

    Of course, the Apple store, I came to realize, is closed now along with everything else 🙂

    Although they do have a phone call assist feature, maybe I can use that …

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  16. Kathaleena, I wonder how many business owners will wind up not re-opening.

    One of the people I interviewed this week, an economics/cargo expert, suggested the recovery will be ‘U’ shaped and not ‘V’ shaped — in other words, it’ll be slower and more gradual than we may hope.

    He said he believed this is a unique recession in that it was so sudden and was essentially self-induced — created by people staying home and not working as opposed to a bank or other outside economic collapse. “Unprecedented” he called it.

    I’ve most often heard a 2-year economic recovery timeframe, but of course it’s all speculation for now and will depend on knocking out the threat of this virus asap with either a vaccine or medications that will largely disarm its more serious symptoms. If that doesn’t happen and it hangs around to sweep through another time or two in the year ahead, it won’t be good.

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  17. Sayings: We have all kinds of colloquialisms from both sides of the family. My mother’s side is of relatively recent English extraction, while my father’s side spent over 250 years in the sleepy heartland of Nova Scotia. Some of the favorite Nova Scotian phrases are:
    “Three sheets to the wind” – dead drunk
    “A few sandwiches short of a picnic” – half crazy
    “Lord willing and the crick don’t rise” – provisional promise

    Speaking of Nova Scotia, the province had another blow when a helicopter went down during a NATO exercise in the Mediterranean with 6 Canadians, three from Nova Scotia. My father spoke to his journalist nephew yesterday, and he was pretty cut up as he had known three of those killed in the shooting and one of the military members in the crash.

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  18. DJ, the two year projection is partly based on the recession after the Spanish influenza, which lasted about two years before the Roaring Twenties really got started. Of course, that economic rise was a short lived bubble, as shown by the crash of 1929 and the Great Depression.

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  19. Back forty, north forty, south forty, east forty, west forty. I refer to them all here. But as our property is just under five acres, it means closer to forty feet.

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  20. The roar was great as they flew over. They were gone in a few seconds.

    I found out Raisin Bran and a lot of common cereals use GMO crops in them. Sad to find that out. I need to be a more careful shopper.

    Roscuro, if you have time, could you enlighten me about Covid toes?

    We have over 26,000 cases in GA now.

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  21. My journalist cousin is quite special to the family. He is the son of my father’s second sister, who was born at 10 months gestation – the only one of my grandmother’s children who was delivered in hospital as the prolonged pregnancy had endangered both their lives. My aunt probably would have been diagnosed, nowdays, with a learning or developmental disability, but she grew up and got married like anyone else. Her husband passed away when her son were in their teens. Both her son had disabilities, and the younger son lives in a group home now. But the elder was determined to become a journalist. He is extremely shy and socially awkward whenever we meet, but his writing is superb. His talents have been noticed, but he has no ambition other than to report on local news, so when his local paper closed, he became part owner and has continued reporting. So, all of us in the family care very much that he will pull through and succeed in his work.

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  22. Janice, I have talked before about how this virus infects cells by binding to ACE2 receptors, receptors that are intended for receiving an enzyme used by the body to control blood pressure. SARS also could bind to ACE2 receptors, though less strongly than COVID-19 can, but the fact that SARS could do so prompted researchers over a decade ago to ask the question of just where in the body were ACE2 receptors. It had long been known that there are many ACE2 receptors in the lungs. But researchers discovered them all through the endothelial (long word essentially meaning lining) cells of both arteries and veins: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7167720/#!po=32.0513. So, imagine now a virus binding to the lining cells of blood vessels, infecting them and dying the lining in the process, and the immune system then trying to fight off those viruses with a barrage of antibodies, immunoglobulins, white blood cells, and inflammatory factors. Blood clots will inevitably result, and that has been what is happening, with some clots growing large enough to entirely block blood flow. When there are arterial blockages in the leg, the toes are going to show the loss of circulation first. I have treated arterial ulcers from severe hardening of the arteries where the the toes are blackened from lack of circulation, without circulation, those ulcers will never heal without restoration of blood flow. If resoration is unsuccessful, the leg will eventually have to be amputated, and the amputation has to be far back enough to allow healing, as otherwise the stump will never heal. But, the blood clots from COVID-19 could form anywhere, and is the reason not only for the blackened Covid toes, but also strokes and kidney failure that are being reported. I expect that cases of bowel blockages will also be discovered, as the intestine is fed by a vast circulatory network that, in cases of severe hardening of the arteries, can become blocked by clots and cause gangrenous bowel.

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  23. The fact that COVID-19 can directly cause the blood clots which are frequently the cause of death due to cardiovascular disease means that any statistical spike that may be observed in deaths from strokes and heart attacks (heart attacks are due to blood clots blocking the arteries feeding the heart muscle) may, in addition to deaths from atypical pneumonia, may well be from undiagnosed COVID-19, further underscoring the likelihood that the death rate is underreported.

    The cases of several countries with weaker health systems having an uncontrollable spike in deaths further emphasizes this. Ecuador, sections of Brazil, parts of Africa lack testing capacity, but are begging to report bodies pilling up and being unable to bury them : https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-52324218

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  24. The worst part, Michelle, is that strokes are being reported in younger people who were asymptomatic or only had mild symptoms with COVID-19. My guess is that the muted immune system response allowed the virus, which enters through the respiratory system, to get into the bloodstream and infect the vessels. The other thing is, that damaged blood vessels are a key contributor to developing cardiovascular disease later in life, meaning that survivors may have had their health permanently damaged.

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  25. Just listened to a zoom cello concert with five young ladies, one of whom was my granddaughter. Fun to be able to see it live.

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  26. Messages work again, after about 40 minutes on the phone with an Apple tech person followed by a long process to reinstall my operating system. It was some kind of glitch (I think) in the automatic update that happened Thursday night; on Friday morning, I could no longer get or send text messages via the computer, a function I rely on heavily throughout my work days.

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  27. … And it wouldn’t let me sign into the messages at all, I tried some google-recommended fixes last night but none of it worked. She took me through those again, wanted to avoid having to do a full re-install, but in the end that’s what worked. She also thought it was something related to the update, some kind of bug.

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  28. For bird watchers – writer’s husband used be one of our reporters, he was very talented, he once did our ho-hum annual Black Friday shopping story in poetry, sending the editors in a confused tail spin.

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  29. So, every Apple product that updated is in the same situation? This is why Apple drives me crazy. They update and “fix” things that make my life harder. What they did to my email is maddening. You used to be able to keep it “new” by clicking a box at the top–on the phone. Now you have open the arrow, look through an array of options, click “unread,” and then close it up.

    Because my phone and Ipad, for some reason, decide which email they’ll open first–and inevitably it’s not the latest email but the one I left “unread” last time, I have to click unread over and over and over again.

    Why leave it unread?

    It’s usually an invitation to a Zoom meeting in a day or two . . . where else am I going to put it so I remember to go?

    No, thanks, yet again Apple.

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  30. Apple can be buggy — my text messages still work fine on my phone & iPad, it was just the laptop that was affected (and possibly that was the only device updated, but we’ll see if “updates” roll through the other devices later).

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  31. Chas, one of the books I have about diseases, the pathologist writing remarks cynically at one point that the sophistication in design of diseases is evidence of a malignant designer. I, of course, do not agree that the Designer is at all malignant, but the least virus shows evidence of a sophistication in design beyond human capability. The genetic encoding necessary to force cells of humans, animals, or plants, to make copy after copy of an agent that is killing them is enormously complicated, and yet viruses carry far less DNA or RNA than any human, animal, or plant cell. I was discussing with my mother the other day the accounts of plagues in the Bible, and wondering if inference could be drawn from accounts of the angels behind plagues such as those in II Samuel 24 and Isaiah 37:36, not to mention those in Revelation, could, when combined with the account in Job 2, that spiritual forces, always operating within limits imposed by God, be behind the development of diseases. My father and I are agreed in theorizing that viruses, rather than being the first evolved forms of nucleic acids, are more probably segments of DNA or RNA from pre-existing organisms that have mutated and gone rogue. How they go rogue is a question still being investigated.

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  32. I have enjoyed a lazy day.
    A Southern Living Magazine came in the mail today. I thought it strange until I remembered someone had called me a while back and said they were renewing their subscription and got a free subscription to give away and would I like it. I said, “Yes, please”. Now I can’t remember who that was so I can thank them.

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  33. I saw the flyover in Atlanta on Fox just now, Janice.

    The goal of our Fleet Week organizers is to get the Blue Angels — they do many of the Fleet Week events but ours in LA is still fairly new (5 or 6 years old now?) so we have to sort of “work up” to getting something like that booked.

    And this year’s event remains a question mark — it’s set for Labor Day weekend, but of course no one knows where we’ll be with the virus and social distancing requirements at that time.

    The Iowa is tentatively planning to do a semi-opening up again in mid-June, I believe; they’re designing “socially-distanced” tours of the ship that would still keep people more separated than usual.

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  34. Thank you, Roscuro. I was especially intrigued when hearing that Covid toes resemble those that have gotten too cold, maybe like frostbite. I do not know anything about frostbite. I don’t even know how to spell it!

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  35. Janice, frostbite and lack of circulation both can cause gangrene, where the toes turn black. Frostbite causes gangrene because the body stops blood flowing to the extremities in extreme cold in order to preserve body heat, in addition to the cold directly freezing the tissue. Once tissue turns black, the damage is irreversible, as it signals the tissue cells have all died.

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  36. The other day, we got out a bag of goat milk as one of the ewes did not appear to be able to figure out her lamb. She figured it out so I needed to use the goat milk. So, of course, I made butterscotch pudding. But that took egg yolks, leaving me with egg whites. So I had to make meringues too, as a reminder of a train trip with daughter to Venezia years ago. Plus, I like meringues.

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  37. Yesterday, we got to talk, finally, to the Youngest family via Skype, except, we could hear them but they couldn’t hear us. In spite of that, everyone seemed happy to see everyone’s faces. Tiny, when we were waiting for the Youngests to come online, asked if we should be standing 6 feet apart, which made me laugh, and also a bit sad that all this is becoming a part of her normal world. It was nice to see Fifth Niece and her older siblings. Youngest says Seventh Nephew still continues to be very caring towards his new little sister. For most of the call, while his three older sibling waved at the camera, bounced around, and made silly faces, he sat quietly on the carpeted floor, thumb in mouth, with his baby sister asleep with her head resting on his lap.

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  38. Mrs B gave me a haircut last weekend. It came out pretty well. She was pretty conservative. I would actually have liked a little more to come off.

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  39. I call my classroom the back 40, as it’s at the end of a long hallway in the back of the school. I also call it the Far East, as it’s the east wing. Since it’s farm land behind the school, guess which classroom gets the most Asian beetles (the kind that look like lady bugs) when it warms up?

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  40. You guys!!!!!!!

    WHO mentioned appliances???????

    Mr. Engineer just “fixed” my grrrrrrrrrrr dishwasher! It’s out of commission for at least a week until the part comes.

    At least I can stack washed dishes on the counter now that the ants have died.

    (Mr. Exterminator confessed he went hunting and on the outside wall saw a trail of ants leading to a nest. So he poisoned it. It wasn’t the Terro afterall . . . though, that doesn’t explain why they’ve fled the upstairs bathroom!)

    I give up.

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  41. My freezer was up to 40 degrees last night, It was down to 8 degrees this morning and is now below 0.

    What needs to be tossed?

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  42. We took our 26yr old out to dinner for her birthday. She wanted Red Robin so we called in curbside service and picked up our food. We then drove over to the Every Home For Christ campus pond and watched the Canada Geese while we dined in the car😊 one of the cutest things to see was Mr and Mrs with their 4 little baby geese (gosling?) we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves on this chilly Spring day

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  43. The Blue Angels practice where I work. It is the Cradle of Naval Aviation and The Lady Lex was there for years. Every Navy pilot learned to land on her.

    Around here we call it the Lower 40.
    The other side of resume speed is when you have gone beyond the last small town and are truly in the boonies.

    Little Miss aka The Ring Tailed Tooter was so happy to see her Mommy when we took her home. Papa came home and took a nap.

    Amos and I have retired for the evening. I’ve started a new book. Monday I promise I am going to get focused

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  44. DJ, any idea how long it was warm? Usually, they say if the ice crystals are still in it it is okay.

    One of our children thought the fridge was the freezer so when told to put the ice cream away, put it in the fridge. Nobody noticed for a couple of days because it was the extra fridge. We ate the ice cream, nobody died.

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  45. Of course, now it is frozen completely again. Difficult to tell how thawed things got. How long was the freezer warm? Two hours? Two days? Makes a difference.

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  46. I don’t think I was “in” the refrigerator much during the day on Friday, don’t remember getting into the freezer at all. I went out for a grocery run after I was off the clock so when I got back, around 7 I guess, I first noticed oh, the freezer says it’s 40 degrees!?

    I fiddled with it for an hour, trying manually hit the down arrow but it kept jumping back up to 40. By the time I was getting ready for bed, I noticed it was down to 30 something. This morning it was down to 8 degrees then went all the way down to 0.

    I’d guess the ice cream would be fine; but what about frozen fish?

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  47. If it was in the middle of the other frozen things, it should be fine. If it was in the door, perhaps not. Does not sound like it was not working long enough to thaw things though.

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  48. One of my groups on Flickr has a 10-item challenge every month where you try to get photos of every category within that month. For instance, they might have “1. Up. 2. Down. 3. The color blue. 4. The number 4 (4 items or the number 4).” And so on. I try to take all nature shots when I can, but sometimes they make it tricky (“Someone eating”), and sometimes they make it impossible (“a tool in your kitchen”), in which case sometimes I take the non-nature shot and sometimes I just figure I won’t get all ten photos that month.

    In May they do an all-color challenge. They have ten different colors, and you’re supposed to take a photo of something of each of the ten colors. Well, somehow they left out purple but had turquoise. Do you know how rarely turquoise appears in nature? There is a stone, and sometimes the sky is almost that color, and I know of one insect that is. Are any of a blue jay’s colors considered turquoise? Anyway, in the first two days of May, I have gotten photos of flowers or insects in all ten colors except turquoise, plus purple. So nine of the ten, but I posted the purple one anyway and said hopefully I can get extra credit. 🙂 One time just for fun during the month I replaced all ten of my photos with new ones, so I actually did the challenge twice, but no one commented that I had. But I’ve never gotten 90% of them the first two days of the month!

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  49. I have been reading through Ezekiel, one of my favorite books of imagery in the Bible – who couldn’t be there ntrigued by the description of the cherubim and the wheels within wheels and the endless temple. I came across a passage I had forgotten was there in Ezekiel 14:
    ‘The word of the Lord came to me: “Son of man, if a land sins against Me by acting faithlessly, and I stretch out My hand against it to cut off its supply of bread, to send famine through it, and to wipe out both man and animal from it, even if these three men—Noah, Daniel, and Job—were in it, they would deliver only themselves by their righteousness.” This is the declaration of the Lord God.’

    I would say that was conclusive proof Job actually lived.

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  50. Roscuro, that was the verse that came to mind for me, too, when we had that discussion. I had actually never heard any other possibility raised until it was raised on the blog.

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  51. The mention of Daniel shows that he was well known in his own time, as Ezekiel, Jeremiah, and Daniel were all contemporaries. During the reign of the last king of Judah, Zedekiah, Jeremiah was in Jerusalem, Ezekiel lived with the exiles who had been taken captive when King Jehoiakin was taken prisoner, and Daniel, one of the royal house who was taken hostage when Nebuchadnezzar first subjugated King Jehoiakim, was a member of Nebuchadnezzar’s staff. I wonder if the Jews back in Jerusalem who refused to listen to warnings about the coming destruction from Jeremiah had it in the back of their minds that they had a man in Nebuchadnezzar’s staff and so reassured themselves they should be fine.

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  52. Morning! It is a beautiful Spring day here and the birds are flitting about. I had a birdhouse sitting on the front porch bench and the birds decided to take up residence so I moved it down below the porch on a bench. They are busily furnishing their home 😊
    I had the weirdest dream last night. My daughter and I were walking about a neighborhood and saw a kangaroo. We stood on a walkway watching and it went to a front yard and out popped the baby from it’s pouch. Turns out it was Michelle’s house. But Michelle was across the road in a backyard typing away. Michelle came to the fence and watched with us…now try and figure that one out!! 😂 🦘

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  53. NancyJill has just reminded me it is Canadian geese nesting and gosling rearing season. I wonder if they have taken over my beloved Spring Lake?

    I spoke too soon. Ants are back. So weary of them!

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  54. Cheryl, I had, and it was from a source I knew was considered quite orthodox. It was one of several such readings I have come across that have alerted me that the leaders/denominations we view as bastions of orthodoxy are not without weak points. Another reading of liberalism that I noticed has entered orthodox circles is the reinterpretation of Isaiah’s words to the kind of Babylon (14) and the parallel passage of Ezekiel’s words to the king of Tyre and Sidon (28), which both directly address the Fallen behind their thrones. Isaiah says the well know phrase “How are you fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning”, while Ezekiel says, “You have been in Eden the garden of God.” The new interpretation says the address is simply to the kings themselves, and is not about the Adversary. In both these passages, as well as in Job, they illustrate something that I think the modern mind finds difficult to accept, that the spiritual and physical realms interact directly with one another. I am not one who sees the devil behind every bush. I get downright annoyed when every difficulty or test is immediately attributed to Satanic opposition, because attributing difficulties only to Satan is overly simplistic theology that dangerously ignores that fact of God’s discipline – and wolves in the church use that to their advantage by claiming Satanic opposition when someone rightly rebukes them. Nevertheless, the naturalist reinterpretation of passages that clearly show a spiritual conflict behind earthly events is a concerning trend.

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  55. Rough night here, Tess threw up several times and I had lots of cleanup to do; a couple of the dog beds may not survive, I’ll have to check them out this morning (tossed them onto the patio after cleaning off what I could). And couple spots on the floor took a hit. I think she was eating something disgusting in the backyard yesterday, I noticed her rooting around out there and she’s done that before.

    I left the doggie door open after that (must have been 2:30 a.m. by then) and Tess seemed to want to stay out there which was fine, considering she might get sick again. Cowboy decided to join her, so I left the patio light on but I think I only had a few hours of sleep. When I got up at 6:30, they were still lying out there so I called them in and they readily came. Tess is asleep on the bedroom floor now, I think she may still not feel well; Cowboy is sleeping on one of the surviving dog beds in the living room.

    Pets – why paper towels are a staple in my household.

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  56. Amos also had a rough night and has so far today. He keeps coughing. We have “over” medicated him. I suppose we will be going to see the vet next week.

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  57. I posted before I saw NancyJill–I’ll go see if there’s a kangaroo in the front yard. I think I would have noticed that . . . .

    Meanwhile, my son #2 preaches for the first time today. He’s a machinist, but they asked him.

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  58. Couldn’t read the whole thing, Janice, due to hitting the pay wall, but that is slightly different than I had in mind. I was thinking of the reports of people having to have limb amputations as a result of COVID-19. This is more like what the article calls chillblains, or perniosis, a phenomenon that anyone who has had their toes get a bit too cold in winter has experienced – the itching is worse than a mosquito bite. It is transitory, which gangrene is not. Second had awful chillblains when she was a teen, and I have experienced them a few times due to having to spend several hours working in a poorly heated room where my toes got numb. Chillblains are due to inflammation of the capillaries of the toes from exposure to cold. If this phenomenon is due to COVID-19, it could be the virus damaging the capillaries. I read an article the other week that children are also experiencing an more serious effect, an immune reaction condition known as Kawasaki syndrome, that causes inflammation of the blood vessels: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/29/more-cases-of-rare-syndrome-in-children-reported-globally.

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  59. It wasn’t your school room that produced chillblains, Mumsee. I worked in another, also teaching French. It was a little private Montessori school in a room built off an old house, and the floors were thin and quite cold.

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  60. Tess looks much better, she napped through the morning as I was “at” church online and when she came out of the bedroom looked like her bright self, thankfully. Both dogs are back napping now, though, I think they probably didn’t sleep all that much while they were outside through wee morning hours (but the pet door was open, they had a choice). It was sweet, I though, that Cowboy stuck by Tess out there.

    Our sermon was on Haggai but we also had an update on church meetings resuming. Possibly 5/24 with many caveats, including a reassessing of everything … and there are quite a few restrictions, including only 20% of the seating (about 350 seats) can be used so there would be multiple services, social distancing, masks, shorter services (45 mins), no SS, no physical contact. Seems almost more restrictive that getting the full service + long Q&A SS sessions online which goes about 3 hours altogether.

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  61. The 20% is out of 350 seats. And full sanitizing in between services by the deacons. People would be “assigned” a service. Communion issue yet to be figured out. Packets? Sealed airline wine?

    I’m just envisioning all of this and wondering if it isn’t just better to wait a few more weeks. But that’s me, I think some in our church are really anxious to get back to in-person services, which I understand. But …

    Well, the soiled dog beds (3 of them) were pretty shot, a couple didn’t have removable covers and the one that did had barfy stuff that seeped through onto the filling anyway. A disgusting, stinky mess, it was, and a lot of it deposited in different places.

    At least they’re not “new” dog beds, they probably were close to having served out their general usefulness anyway. Some things just don’t last forever. I had been thinking they might need replacing soon anyway. Just not this soon. 😦

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  62. anyone here thinking of joining the blog zoom meeting today?? Michelle said that she would get it together for anyone. Hop over to the raves or rants.

    Liked by 1 person

  63. I am reading ‘On the Shores of Silver Lake’ to Tiny now. She asked a couple of days ago when Almanzo would get to where Laura was. I replied he wouldn’t come until the next book, thinking of his heroic mission to find wheat in ‘The Long Winter’. I had forgotten he made a brief appearance in ‘On the Shores of Silver Lake’. I just read Tiny the chapter where Laura first catches a glimpse of the Wilder boys and their horses. Tiny grabbed my arm, smiled wide, and cried, “She’s meeting Almanzo!”

    It made her day brighter, I think. When we sat down to read, she said to me, “I live you. I don’t want you to die until God says it’s time for you to die.” I reassured that I wouldn’t die until God said it was time, but I think the poor child’s precociousness is burdening her with more knowledge than she can handle right now.

    Liked by 3 people

  64. Can’t seem to reach my Missouri cousin, last time I called, 1 or 2 Saturdays ago, got a message that said the person “was busy” — one of those automated things.

    So I called again today and it rang several times and then just disconnected.

    Unfortunately, there’s no other way to reach him other than snail mail. He has a flip phone that he can’t operate the voicemail on and that’s it, no email.

    Only family is on his deceased wife’s side and I would have no idea of how to contact them, either; but the plan was for him to sell his house and move in with them, they’re also in MO. When we talked last, maybe 4-5 weeks ago, he was having trouble getting the price he wanted for his house so it hadn’t sold — and I’m guessing with the real estate market tanking that’s still the case.

    Talked to a friend from church who’s in the camp that thinks all of the quarantine is ridiculous. Our pastor released a 13-minute video on youtube describing where we’re at with plans to reopen the physical church services and he said people are “all over the map” with opinions. We apparently have been in touch with a law firm that’s advising churches on how to proceed. (But I still think the plans laid out in that video sound like it would be more trouble than it’s worth right now.)

    Liked by 1 person

  65. I watched the church service on Facebook Live. The sermon was about reaching out to others with the gospel. The Romans Road was one approach the pastor taught about and is his personal way of presenting the gospel to most people.

    Like

  66. Blog Zoom meeting? I didn’t know. If it was announced on this thread I would have attended.

    Bummer. Or is it Monday night? Maybe Mrs L would join us.

    Like

  67. Steel Magnolias is such a good movie.

    And Raiders of the Lost Ark is on tonight, another one I haven’t seen in ages, since it was in the theater. It was released in 1981.

    I snuck in a 40-minute nap late today after getting so little sleep last night, it felt good.

    Liked by 2 people

  68. I have a late assignment tomorrow in Long Beach, I haven’t actually been “out” to cover something since the Navy hospital ship arrived in port

    Like

  69. I enjoyed the movie, Steel Magnolias,” but I like the play much better. Learned that when our youngest daughter was in it.

    Middle daughter was out taking dead leaves off a magnolia tree when the power went out and everything got very dark. There was a whole lot of trees down in the neighborhood and some roof damage. They didn’t see any damage on their house, although they will look more carefully tomorrow. SIL helped clean up some of the trees down on the streets near them. So blessed to have not have worse for them.

    Liked by 1 person

  70. I’ve been busy all day.

    Zoom “meet and great” 5 pm California time for an hour tomorrow, Monday May 4.

    I’ll see it up tomorrow and send out invites to all who contact me.

    If you have not used Zoom before, you might want to download the website now, Zoom.com

    I will email you an official link which has all the information you will need. It generally goes easier if you have already downloaded the free app.

    I think Jo can do the introductions since she’s met most of you! Lol

    Liked by 4 people

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