40 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 9-7-18

  1. Evening, Chas. I am feeling cold here, so the trees look just right. I also may have a cold, but have run out of zicam. Another thing to put on my Christmas list.
    Speaking of cold, the maps tell me that Roscuro is 25 to 50 miles from the Artic circle, now that is cold.

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  2. If anyone asked me, I certainly couldn’t give away where Roscuro is, I can’t even begin to pronounce it.
    Internet is not working too well. I am glad that this page loaded. It is going to be a long weekend with no internet. This happened last weekend, too.

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  3. Beautiful scene. Makes me want to go on a hike.

    Oh, well. I’m stuck in the rainy Midwest. We have a stalled cold front causing a lot of rain, and the remnants of Gordon are coming tomorrow with even more! Up to 6 inches expected. Glad my house isn’t in a flood zone.

    Might as well enjoy the Friday funnies!

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  4. I’ll read them later, Peter.
    I mentioned yesterday that she needs constant care.
    Sounds bad, and it is inconvenient, but not as bad as it sounds. I’m saying that she needs someone around to keep her from wandering off and doing something that might hurt her, or someone. She isn’t taking medicine, or any such.
    It’s just hard, she goes around looking for something she needs to do. But she doesn’t need to do anything anymore..
    How would you like to not be needed anymore?

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  5. It isn’t that cold. Since we have got here, the weather has been quite mild. I mentioned that the first airplane landing we made in the north, in the capital of Nunavut, we could see our breath, but I haven’t seen my breath since we reached our final destination. Even though we are now further north than Iqaluit, the capital, the weather seems milder.

    Speaking of seeing things, apparently the whales were spotted in the fjord again yesterday. The other student and I were stuck inside doing our online course, so we missed them. Today, I am sick. Not really sure what is wrong, but my digestive system is really acting up.

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  6. Inuktitut, the language spoken on Baffin Island, has only three vowel sounds, a, i, and u. The vowel sounds are short, unless it is a double vowel. The spellings of place names on maps are English transliterations of how the name sounds to our ears, with renderings of consonant sounds familiar to us. So pronunciation of place names is fairly straightforward, just pronounce what you read.

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  7. Morning! Kare’s forest looks very different than mine. Are those Lodge Pole Pines?
    I am off to have coffee with friends….it is a lovely day in this Colorado forest and we have reports of many mountain peaks being covered with snow..including Pike’s Peak. I am looking forward to a snowy winter as we felt quite left out last winter! ⛄️

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  8. Chas, she is needed. She gives you somebody to look after. Not exactly how you had planned to spend these years, of course, but you are doing it very well.

    My stepmom is quite able to hold a conversation, sometimes over and over. And she is mostly in her chair but one of the reasons daughter is there is because sometimes stepmom will feel she needs to go do something and daughter is there to see she doesn’t fall. My dad is there too, though he does get out once a week for an hour or so to do the grocery shopping, but he is fairly deaf and would not hear her if she got into trouble. Since daughter has been there, stepmom has not been back to the hospital for three years and continues to do well at ninety six.

    Perhaps you have a young relative who could live with you and provide a similar service. Paying her would be much less expensive than paying for a care facility. And it would ease your burden, allowing you time to get out and do some things during the week. It, of course comes with having to learn to put up with another person’s weirdness as my dad and stepmom have had to do. They are not used to people staring at their smartphones, wearing skin tight revealing clothing, eating strange things, wearing a different wig every day, etc. But once again, this past week, they all three affirmed that the challenges are worth it to keep the grandparents at home. What a blessing adopting has been!

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  9. Yes, the only buildings in the pictures on FB are part of a historic site, and not used. I was trying to get pictures of the landscape and so avoided pictures of the hamlet. If I had taken pictures of the mountains from where I live (in a residence built for the nursing staff), instead of from the shore, there would have been buildings and powerlines in the way. There are quite a few buildings in the hamlet, all up on piles, as otherwise the heat from the houses would thaw the permafrost in the ground underneath, which would render the ground unstable. In the two days I have gone around with the home care team, I have seen most of the hamlet and been in several of the residences and other buildings. If you want to see a picture, type in the place name on a search engine, as the community has a website with a lovely picture of the hamlet.

    It has (almost) everything a community would need – government building, sewage treatment plant (sewage is collected by truck, as there are no sewage lines dug in the permafrost), fuel depot, police station, post office, airport, water reservoir (water is delivered by truck), arena, public and high school, health centre (of course), two grocery stores, a hotel for tourists, and some shops for tourists as well. It is rather better supplied with all those things due to its proximity to a tourist attraction, but even so, the poverty of the north is visible. The Inuit still hunt their traditional prey (I saw quite a few skins on drying racks) but it is much more expensive to do so now, with modern equipment like guns, motor boats, and snowmobiles, so only those with some money can afford to do it. There is high unemployment as a result and the accompanying effects of enforced idleness. It doesn’t help that officious Westerners (especially Europeans) now frown on the use of sealskin and other animal products, so that the market for Inuit products is now greatly reduced. The Inuit are not wasteful, they use every part of an animal they kill, they do not kill wantonly, and they have no desire to hunt their prey to extinction (they are quite conscious of that), but that makes little difference to the global animal rights groups.

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  10. Sort of like loggers who are not really interested in putting an end to their livelihood, but aren’t allowed to harvest trees in many areas instead, forest fires take care of all those would have been homes.

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  11. I had a long night after going to bed early. I wasn’t able to open my bedroom window as usual (it is one of those now encased in tape and plastic) but the fans kept the room cool and it’s still very cool outside right now at night. That could change this weekend, though.

    I did wake up with a couple new mosquito bites, I may have a couple of those new little ones in the house. I’ve been a constant, itchy mess all summer and I can’t remember the last time I’d had a mosquito bite before this year. So it’s back to using repellant every night I suppose, even though the windows are staying closed. The vector control person I’d interviewed last month (that mosquito story I wrote continues to be one of the most read on our site, three weeks later) said it’ll get worse before summer leaves and the mosquitos will be around probably until November or so.

    I think I have an easy story to do today and then I’ll have to work tomorrow to cover a protest in town. After that I plan to “cash in” some of my built-up comp time from other weekend assignments and take my own personal long weekend in the next couple weeks.

    Priming is supposed to start today, depending on wind issues, but we will see.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Mumsee @ 9:18. It isn’t bad under the circumstances. And we have it better than many. She is presently at an Adult Center at a Methodist Church. I take her there twice a week for four hours each. Cost over $300/mo but it’s worth it. She needs to get out with other people. And she doesn’t complain about going. But she is always glad when I arrive to get her.
    And we have ladies who come in for four hours on Mon, Tues, Thurs and Sat. So I have lots of help. And Chuck & Linda are close by.
    That’s why we aren’t in H’ville.
    Me? I’m just taking one day at a time and waiting for the Lord to act.
    Whatever.

    Liked by 4 people

  13. The first cartoon. I did not understand at all. Usually I pass those by, but this is beyond me. A man holding a NYT book, evidently Anonymous, looking at a pretty woman. What does she have to do with it.
    Somebody explain this to this vacant head.

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  14. I don’t mean to start a names thread again. But there is a young (?) woman on Fox Business named Juanita.
    That was my mother’s name. I thought the name died with her.
    There is a song to “Juanita”, but I have never heard the name in years.

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  15. One of our daughters was named Juanita but she changed to a more modern name when adopted. Then she regretted the change and went back for a short time but now sticks with the new name. We told her it was a beautiful name.

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  16. “Feminine form of Juan, the Spanish form of John (God is gracious), which is from the Middle Latin Johannes, an evolution of the Ecclesiastic Late Latin Joannes. Joannes is from the Greek Iōannes, a derivative of the Hebrew Yehanan, a short form of Yehohanan, which is from yehōhānān (Yahweh is gracious).”

    It’s peak popularity was in the 1920s and Chas is right, it’s pretty much bottomed out in popularity according to the chart on this website:

    http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/girl/juanita

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  17. I knew a girl named Waneta, pronounced like Juanita. But this is Missouri and it’s best to spell a name how it sounds to the American ear.

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  18. Charles, James, Virginia, Juanita, Emily, Elaine, Beverly, Gabriella, Charlene, Daryl, Cheryl, Joy
    Joy is the baby of the family. She was born after my grandmother “had her tubes tied”. The doctor offered to adopt her. You can see by her name that my grandmother was having none of that. It is sad because she is 63 years old and has early onset dementia. She knows that something is wrong, and she handles it well.

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  19. I went back and couldn’t find it. But it was there, but not really cartoon form. It was an attractive woman in heels, a man, not cartoon, looking at a copy of the NYT. Didn’t catch the meaning.

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  20. I went to Donna’s link to check out the name “Essie” but couldn’t get it to work.
    Essie was the name of the mother of my best friend as a child. I never heard it again.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Chas, I think the young woman might be Trump’s daughter. I didn’t see the cartoon when I first opened the link, but when I opened it when you asked the question, it was there. Then when I looked through the cartoons, the third one was the first one I had seen the first time.

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  22. Oh, I’ve been scratching all day long again.

    Essie: (from Wikipedia)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essie

    ___________________________________

    Essie is a given name and nickname/hypocorism usually used as a feminine name.

    As a standalone name, Essie can be found in several languages, including Romance, Germanic, and Persian ones. In each case, the name means “star.”[1]

    As a nickname, it is used as a short form of several names, including Esther, Estelle, Celeste, and Esmeralda.[1][2]

    In the United States, the name reached its greatest popularity in the 1890s, peaking as the 139th most popular name for girls born during that decade.[3] By 2018, it was notable for being disproportionately used by Southerners and African Americans.[4] …
    _________________________________

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  23. Donna, makes sense. Essie Murray was elderly (to me, she must have been around 60) in 1950. Means she was born in the late 1800;s.

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  24. I learned today that Lasix (sp?), the diuretic, can cause gout. I learn something new each time I take Karen to the doctor. Also, if anyone you know uses a nitro glycerin patch, they are suppose to remove it at night or it loses its effectiveness. Roscuro probably knows these things. When Karen worked as a cardiac nurse, they left the patches on all the time.

    Today, my brother got our back patio area cleared so it would be usable except for the mosquitoes (thinking of you, DJ). It is cleared just in time for the fall leaves to cover it again. It does seem like we have an extra room now.

    I hope you will soon feel better, Roscuro.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Today while driving Karen to and from her appointment, we passed by many Stacy Abrams signs (Dem candidate for Governor). I commented how I did not like it when I saw those signs beside the Black Lives Matter signs since Ms. Abrams is black. Those posted together, I have seen near my home.But thankfully, in all the signage I saw today, I did not see those two signs side by side. Perhaps someone got the word out that it was not right. Karen said the race is about 50-50. I said that we’ve heard similar news before. Karen thinks we are headed to a civil war. 😞

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