63 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 6-2-17

  1. It IS Friday!
    You know what that means?
    Next week this time I will have had the Sweetest Woman in the Whole Wide World for Sixty Years.
    Present company not excepted. πŸ˜†

    I’m thinking of sending Aj a picture. I think some of you have it. It’s my screen saver.

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  2. Good morning.

    Chas: The loving way you speak of Elvera is so beautiful.

    Sorry for “disappearing” again–life has been crazy in Spring, TX. Lindsey fell off a horse again–but thankfully only has a sprained neck and not another concussion….We found my “lost” cousin and I’ve been extremely busy trying to establish a deeper connection with him so we can encourage him to get evaluated by a mental health professional. He is now staying at an inexpensive hostel–but said hostel is an hour from my house out in the ‘burbs….so I’ve been in the car A LOT lately….

    Today, we are headed to Boerne, TX, which is close to my hometown of Bandera (both in the Hill Country of Texas), for a dear friend of mine’s daughter’s wedding.

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  3. Ever time I hear of Bandera, I think of the waltz.
    I took Peter’s Jeopardy for a minute and a half. I knew Samson and Nikki Halley
    . That’s all. So, I knew I was out of my element.

    Actually, worse than that because I couldn’t think of Nikki’s name at the time.

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  4. Ann, maybe Lindsey needs to stay off of horses for a while? I know, once you fall in love with a horse there is nothing else. I have friends who are that way.
    Chas, you inspire us all. We feel like we are a part of your family and your love for Elvera is priceless to us as well as your real family.

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  5. Morning all. So glad that Friday is over. What a week of excitement. I may need to work less on report cards tomorrow and more on my plans. Need to keep the class busy and learning. Today we learned how to fill a plastic eye dropper and slowly release drops. Then they got to find how many drops of water a penny would hold. They were all surprised.

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  6. Good Morning! A precious love story founded upon a couple’s deep love and faith in our precious Saviour….Chas and Elvera we all are ever so thankful to know and love you both ❀
    Good to see you again Ann…so sorry to hear that L keeps falling off of her horse! The thing that comes to my mind is Velcro! πŸ™‚
    Have a blessed end of the week…I'm off to work…

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  7. I don’t know, Linda, but I think the Adorables–including yours–need to discover the answer, too! πŸ™‚

    A week from now will be my last day in my sixth decade. That makes me feel really old.

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  8. Those things ought to come with seatbelts. I have two horses but I never get on them because I tend to fall off and cannot afford that. Talking sense into a young person is not going to happen. Examples: my nineteen year old daughter who continues to fall off and get back on. She has had a couple of significant concussions but is grown and on her own and won’t change her ways until she is ready, regardless of doctor’s words. And son who continues to want to play football and other hazardous activities despite several concussions.

    And I know seatbelts on a horse would not be a good idea. We had donkeys and one of them would roll to dislodge the rider. Fortunately, donkeys are so short the rider could step off.

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  9. I am currently reading a book called Without Remorse. It is about our fight with Islam. An interesting book but not easy to follow because of so many sub plots. But a section of that pictures an account of what I often imagined what happens to jihadists immediately after they die in jihad: Some parts omitted (….) to same space.

    β€œThen a force that felt beyond this world carried him away from a headless torso lying ten feet from his severed arm-hands still clutching the.50-caliber machine gun.
    For an instant the macabre sight vanished in a dense fog replaced by a spectacular field of green amidst the whitest clouds and brightest stars.
    He felt the most wonderful warmth engulfing him.
    Paradise
    At last.

    But it didn’t last long.
    A stronger force suddenly dragged him down, pulling him below the glimpse of what felt like heaven and in darkness beyond anything he had ever experienced.
    And it was here, as the heat returned overwhelming him that the wails and cries of countless souls smothered him. Nasser felt the presence of the many warriors of Islam who had fought along side him and perished, killed by the infidels.
    And the blaze scoured him, the visions came, materializing within the flames – visions of his life, of all the people he had killed. He recalled the men he had castrated in front of their wives and daughters, before raping and maiming them.
    He remembered every instance when he had taken a life. He recollected every act of torture, when he had violated women and even girls and boys while his comrades cheered him on. Visions of him, clad in black, beheading their enemies in front of video cameras surrounded him as the fire closed in.

    But it was too late now.

    So Nassar did the only thing he could do: cry out into the endless inferno, joining the howling around him.

    He cried in anger for having been deceived, …..

    And then he cried out in fear, as pain gripped him, the sizzling pain of terror came into him with the crushing realization that this would be….forever

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  10. Good Brunch time on Friday. Now if I could just go out for brunch!

    Chas and Elvera are such a blessed example of what God intended marriage to be. My knowledge of what it takes to keep a marriage sweetly strong and exuberant for the long haul has been enriched over and over by seeing Chas comment about his beloved Elvera.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I pictured the pilot of the plane flying into the World Trade center. It burst into flames as the plane exploded. He’s still waiting for the fire to cease.

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  12. On my small phone screen it took a bit of time to see the bird in the header. Did you see it immediately or have to look for it, AJ? Sometimes, probably half the time, I don’t know all that I have captured in my photos until I look back at them. That was how it was with Waldo, the bug, in the yucca flower photo.

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  13. AJ, that is really a beautiful, artistic photo of a female red-bellied woodpecker! Is she at her nest hole? I remember reading that the species digs a new hole every year, but it might be right before last year’s, and that looks like what happened there.

    Funny thing is, it’s almost exactly what my husband and I went looking for yesterday, only we were hoping to see nesting pileated woodpeckers, having seen the male hollowing out a nest hole six weeks before. His was the lower of two holes, too. Only leaves had grown between the hole and the trail in those six weeks and we couldn’t find it for sure. (We might have found it, but could barely see it between leaves and for sure couldn’t see whether there were two holes on the tree.) After we found what we thought to be it, rather than sit down and wait and see if the woodpeckers showed up, my husband marked the trail with his foot as to the spot to stand, and said, “Let’s go for a walk, and come back this way” . . . only we came back a different way. We really might not have seen them at all–we don’t know if they stayed and used the site (coons could have gotten the eggs or any other number of things could have happened)

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  14. Chas, I cannot imagine Hell and I cannot imagine wanting anybody to go there but that should motivate us to tell everybody. But God knows what He is doing.

    Randy Alcorn opened my eyes to an idea of how horrific Hell would be, especially to a believer who wants to be with God, to be totally separated from Him. Did Jesus experience that on the cross? For me?

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  15. That woodpecker would go well with my pet collection and bathroom decor.

    I barely got up in time to get the trash out, I was so sound asleep through this morning. Beat the trucks by only about 30 minutes. Good thing they didn’t come around early today.

    The thought of eternity in hell is horrific and my only response to it, ever, is ‘there but for the grace of God …’ 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Cheryl,

    Yep, I found a nest. πŸ™‚

    I got a couple of really good shots, including one with both parents in it. πŸ™‚

    I know the nest site and will be watching for the next few weeks to see if I can see some fledglings leaving. They’re already hatched, because the parents were bringing in bugs to eat as well. πŸ™‚

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  17. Of course “last day in my sixth decade” could mean turning 59, which means she will have completed 59 and starting the 60th year of life.

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  18. Exciting weekend ahead for me — online traffic “school” & test and washer/dryer installation (just in time, the laundry now has really piled up).

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  19. AJ, I think you should be able to see older nestlings poking their heads out to be fed before they leave the nest–that is what my husband and I were looking for yesterday, with the plieated nest. And most woodpeckers have a cool feature that you can actually tell if they are male or female before they leave the nest–they get more or less adult coloring while still nestlings.

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  20. Peter, please explain.
    If she turned 1 at the end of her first year, 2 at the end of her second year, and so forth, then she turned 10 at the end of her tenth year, which was the end of her first decade, right? That would make her last day in her first decade the day before her tenth birthday. Following that that would mean she’ll turn 60 at the end of her sixth decade, thus her last day in her sixth would need to be the day before her sixtieth birthday. I think.

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  21. Those children. I am seeing a little dictator coming along. Nine year old was given the instructions, in five steps. They all were but she was the one to retain them. She guided the eleven and fifteen year olds in putting up the five green horse panels to protect the goat shelters from the horses, moved the horses to the old pig pen, tied the fence closed behind them, opened the fence from the pig pen to the goat pasture, emptied and moved the water trough and refilled it. Good job, children!

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  22. Linda – your logic makes sense. However, my thinking that the day of her 10th birthday was the first day of her 2nd decade, since the counting begins on the day of birth, or the first day of the first decade. So I should have said that next Friday is the day before her 60th birthday. Am I correct, Michelle?

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  23. Actually, maybe I did the math wrong. I’ll be 61–wasn’t last year the end of my sixth decade?

    But who’s counting?

    Seventh decade, however, seems REALLY old. πŸ™‚

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  24. I’m definitely in my eighth decade.
    Mumsee, @ 12:26. Seriously, you likely have a future engineer. Encourage her in math and physics. .

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  25. Sorry, Michelle, but you’ve been in your seventh decade for a year already. As you started your first decade when you turned zero (when you were born), you started your seventh decade when you turned 60.

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  26. I’m already into my 7th decade by a week and 2 days.

    Chas- I see that Megyn Kelly is starting a new show on NBC this weekend: Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly. It’ll be up against 60 Minutes on CBS. Should be interesting. Her first guest is Vladimir Putin. Wasn’t Ms. Kelly one of your favorites on FOXNews?

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  27. Now, if we calculate age the traditional East Asian way, you are one when you are born, so the year after the day of your birth, you turn two, and so on. That would make all of a us a year further into our particular decade. Myself, I’m either three or four years (plus a few months) into my fourth decade, depending on the age calculation.

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  28. I have been finger printed by the State of Florida now and have timed the drive from the “office” to my house. It will be 45 minutes to an hour but Mr. P went with me today and we had lunch. He brought along a book on tape (actually it was audio on a Kindle) and I did enjoy listening to it. I think I can do that.
    Now I have done everything but take the licensing test and I do have a “cheat sheet” to study questions and answers. I can do this.

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  29. Rereading the comments on when one starts their final decade, apparently I can’t do math. I would only be two or three years into my fourth decade, not three or four. That makes me feel slightly better πŸ˜‰

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  30. Absolutely you can do this, Kim — you go, girl! πŸ™‚

    I had a 45-minute commute my first year of teaching, and the drive was a nice transition from home to school and vice versa. Except when the roads were snowy or icy or such. Then it was a long, sometimes tension-filled drive. But you don’t have to deal with road conditions like that much. (Or at all?)

    On another note, we have a car now that my husband has been working on. It had formerly been owned by someone in Florida before it was sold to another person up in these parts before last winter. Now we own it, and my husband remarked on how some plastic components were in really bad shape. The Florida heat did quite a number on them, I guess.

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  31. Linda, I believe that the age also depend on the lunar year they were born in, but I’m not sure how. It seemed rather complicated when I tried looking for information on the internet, but I learned about the different calculations in age via friends of the family from that area of the world.

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  32. Donna, the bathroom is finished. It is real nice with two grab bars, sliding glass doors a seat and separate temperature control so that you can sit it at desired temp and leave it there.
    it looks real nice.

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  33. Peter, I liked Megyn Kelly, but I doubt that I will follow her to CBS. I can take it as long as Shannon Bream is still there.
    πŸ˜‰

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  34. “The Money Pit” was the first movie I saw in a theater (I was 18). I hated it, would have left except my sister was the one to drive. But the sex scenes and other aspects of it were embarrassing and awkward (they were anyway, but my little brother was with us too), and I don’t really like slapstick or over-the-top comedy and it got really old.

    But I had never seen the “official trailer” (my brother and sister had seen a commercial, told me it looked hilarious and that Mom said we could go, and so I went with them), and I didn’t realize that the couple isn’t even married and that the trailer makes it obvious they aren’t. (They’re “single and in love.”)

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  35. oops sorry. But I am a little surprised as I saw the movie in the ’80s, too, but really have no recollection of any sex scenes or their unmarried status. Even the clips from it were only vaguely familiar to me.

    OK, then, we’ll stick with the Mr. Blanding’s Cary Grant version of house disasters.

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  36. We tried to watch The Money Pit a few months ago and couldn’t handle how stupid and irritating it was. OTOH, I’ve watched Mr. Blandings build his dream house many times. πŸ™‚

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  37. DJ, I’ve often suggested a movie, remembering how funny it was, and then when watching it again I’m amazed at how much I had blocked out.

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  38. DJ, I wasn’t complaining about your linking it. I suspect the sex scenes might be mild by industry standards (not sure–it has been 30-plus years since I’ve seen the thing, having bypassed any future opportunity to do so), but just stating my own history with that film.

    It was actually probably useful for me to see that film, though I would have walked out halfway through if I had transportation home . . . because I remember looking around the theater and seeing children there (11 or 12, I think), and thinking that they were probably used to seeing that sort of scene. And I made a mental note never to let myself get “used” to it, and to check a film’s content ahead of time in the future. Since we grew up not watching movies, I’d never had to wrestle with that. Basically I got home after four months out of town to discover my brother and sister wanted to attend this movie, they wondered if I wanted to come, and they checked with Mom and she did not in fact think it was morally wrong to attend movies and it was OK if we went. (I have wondered at times if my dad thought it wrong, or if we all just assumed they did because so many of our churches did. Dad had died about two years before that. I’m pretty sure every one of my older brothers, and many of their children, still believe it wrong to attend movies in a theater, and my younger siblings have gone back and forth on the matter.)

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  39. Yeah, I actually remember hardly anything about the movie (and I’ve never watched it since I saw it in the theater), but I do have the impression it was a bit of a let-down from what was anticipated. I’ve seen Blanding’s Dream House, too, but not in ages and so I remember very little of that either — and I suspect those kinds of movies get more of a chuckle from those who have gone through (or are going through the joys and tribulations of) home ownership (which I wouldn’t have yet at the time I saw either of those films).

    Watered the little tree out front when I got home from work. I still haven’t heard when the washer/dryer installers are coming tomorrow.

    What will go wrong with the house next, I wonder …

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