19 thoughts on “News/Politics 5-10-17

  1. Our leader is watching TV and Tweeting this morning and he is not happy.

    Like

  2. This appears to be a 3-Tweeter.

    Like

  3. … the Russian ambassador (who has a scheduled meeting with Trump this morning) is being asked to wait while Trump completes the Twitter storm.

    Like

  4. There now. All finished. Mr Lavrov, You may now see the President.

    Like

  5. I’m just poking my head in from work to give up the ghost….I don’t know when it died, but I’m thinking he didn’t quite make it to Day 7. The firing of Comey is disappointing. :–(

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Why is it disappointing? The man has repeatedly botched the biggest investigations to hit the FBI in a long time.

    But I do love the hypocrisy from outraged Dems. They spent weeks attacking him over the Clinton investigation, demanded he be fired or resign, and yet now they act like it’s the worst thing ever that Trump gave them what they asked for.

    But now they all whine and say it’s because of the Russia probe, the probe which Clapper, Comey, and Feinstien, all admit found no evidence to support their claims.

    Trump pointed all this out, but of course Ricky musta missed these Tweets from Trump.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Re Richard Blumenthal, I kind of liked him as the CT AG. But then, I didn’t run an organization or business that ever ran afoul of his agenda. He had serious detractors. But it was well known that if you were an ordinary citizen, his office was always open.

    An older woman who worked for my husband went to Blumenthal and complained about the furnace she had purchased from a company and paid them to install. After a year, it stopped working, and they were repairing it repeatedly, but the company would not make it good without charging her. She didn’t think she should have to pay for the repairs, so she complained to Blumenthal.

    I don’t know what was said, but the AG’s office sent a letter to the company, and immediately, the furnace was replaced with a brand new one. No more problems.

    I haven’t kept up with what he’s doing in the Senate, but he’s liberal to the core. Not like Joe Lieberman.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. This info provides some justification for Trump’s travel ban.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/447423/comey-terror-cases-refugees?utm_source=social&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=krikorian&utm_content=terror

    “So 15 percent of the FBI’s terrorism cases are refugees – far more than their share of the immigrant population, let alone the general population. And that denominator of 2,000 presumably includes people with no immigration nexus at all – skinheads, antifa, Klan, environmental and animal rights extremists, et al. So the refugee share of immigration-related terrorism investigations is more than 15 percent, perhaps much more.

    This suggests that the president’s temporary pause in travel from six terrorist-ridden Middle Eastern countries (the subject of appeals court proceedings today in Richmond) is almost beside the point. Better, tougher, more thorough vetting isn’t likely to make any difference since refugees really are pretty thoroughly vetted. The problem is that vetting people from failed or enemy states is impossible.

    Combined with the moral case against diverting refugee funds for resettlement of a few instead of protection-in-place for many more, the conclusion is clear: refugee resettlement should be discontinued except in the most extraordinary, emergency cases. And even the UN refugee agency acknowledges that emergency cases make up only 0.4 percent of its resettlement referrals (See Table 8).

    Help refugees where they are – our money goes much, much further and we can keep the security threats off shore.”

    Like

  9. I wonder what was meant by “terrorism investigations“. Would it be correct to assume that those were not necessarily investigations of those already guilty, but those suspected of something? I would hazard to guess that among the other 85% were Christian or conservative groups, since the Obama admin seemed to think of some of those groups as terrorists.

    Like

  10. The Trump Effect continues to work.

    Funny what just the knowledge that we’re now enforcing the law will do, huh?

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/us-sees-sharp-fall-illegal-immigration-mexico-officials-182456211.html

    “Illegal immigration across the US-Mexico border fell for the fifth straight month in April as the Trump administration’s crackdown takes root, the Department of Homeland Security said Tuesday.

    Apprehensions of undocumented immigrants, an indicator for the overall flow, fell to 11,129 in April, the lowest in decades, down two-thirds from the same month a year ago.

    In the first three full months since President Donald Trump’s inauguration on January 20, just over 42,000 were detained, compared to nearly 133,000 a year ago.”
    ——————–

    It’s like magic!…. or something…….

    Like

  11. Karen,

    Correct. Guilty and suspected.

    But you just don’t happen to end up in “violent extremist investigations” for no reason. You don’t just get randomly selected for that. These are investigations after the “vetting process” and entry to the US.

    Many more details here, from a link in the NR link above, from Congressional testimony. Lot’s of footnotes and links. As you can see, there were 900 active investigations in 2015, but it’s 2,000 plus now. Obviously the prior process of vetting was failing to work as advertised.

    http://cis.org/testimony/Krikorian-Syrian-Refugee-Crisis-Impact-Security-US-Refugee-Admissions-Program

    “The combination of these two security vulnerabilities – the impossibility of vetting candidates for resettlement, plus the growth of domestic breeding grounds – is a big part of why the FBI has some 900 active investigations into domestic extremists, the vast majority related to ISIS.

    These investigations come in the wake of many examples of terrorism-related activities by refugees. (All parts of the immigration system have been exploited by terrorists, not just the refugee program; see, for instance, “How Militant Islamic Terrorists Entered and Remained in the United States, 1993-2001″.) For instance, two al Qaeda bomb makers were arrested in Kentucky after having been resettled as refugees. Nor are they likely the only ones; ABC News reported in 2013:

    Several dozen suspected terrorist bombmakers, including some believed to have targeted American troops, may have mistakenly been allowed to move to the United States as war refugees, according to FBI agents investigating the remnants of roadside bombs recovered from Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Other examples: An Uzbek refugee, who presumably underwent the stringent screening that the administration boasts of, was convicted in Idaho earlier this year on terrorism charges. A number of Bosnian refugees, presumably also screened, were charged this year with sending money and weapons to Islamist groups in Syria and Iraq.

    Some have suggested resettling only Christians and other religious minorities from Syria, because we could be fairly certain they would not be affiliated with ISIS or al Qaeda. And indeed, there currently appears to be a policy of discrimination against Christian refugees; Muslims are overrepresented among the Syrians whom we have resettled, perhaps in part because the UN selects the refugees for us from its camps, and Christian refugees fear going to the camps, lest the Muslim refugees kill them, as happened this spring when Muslim passengers on a smuggling boat in the Mediterranean threw people overboard to their deaths because they were Christians.”

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s