64 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 4-25-17

  1. Good morning to be up early, AJ! It’s great to hear birds singing as an alarm clock. I prefer it to the little clawing and tiny nips from Miss Bosley when she wants me to get up and feed her.

    That header photo is quite nice. Are there ticks or other types of biting things that are a bother so far north?

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  2. Good evening Jo.
    Good morning everyone else.
    I thought the rain had stopped last night because I couldn’t hear it. But it’s still raining.
    We have metal vents in both baths and the kitchen, and we can hear the rein when it’s falling.
    This is the first time since we lived in the house trailer that we can hear the rein.
    It isn’t an unpleasant sound. I didn’t mind going to sleep with the patter of rain on the roof of our trailer.
    But this is the first time since 1965 that I can remember hearing the rain while in bed.

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  3. That is a beautiful photo…I would suspect creepy crawly things lurking about in such a setting πŸ™‚
    A rough start to my last morning here at Moms….her pug is ill and has kept us up most of the night…”Midge” ate some raw hides and I suspect one is lodged in her colon area…Mom took the dog to the vet yesterday and she was given two injections…one for nausea the other an antibiotic…Mom is beside herself and I am leaving at 9….the timing could not be worse….trusting the Lord to bring her calm…if anything happened to this dog…well…Mom doesn’t cope well….and I feel as though I am abandoning them both…

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  4. Morning all. Music continues across the valley, election season you know. Today there was a posting asking folks to not drive out to aviation to greet the newcomers as the roads were too crowded due to the election. That is a first. Not a season to travel around this country.

    Exciting that many new folks arrived today. The next session of the Pacific Orientation Course just ended. 27 adults and 27 children. I will be getting a new student on Friday.

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  5. Looks like a place for snakes up there. But northern water snakes are not poison. Just Southern cottonmouths. But rattlesnakes are everywhere.

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  6. I woke up to find a tick crawling on my chest, opened this blog to find the first post mentions ticks. Is it too late to go back to bed?

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  7. They are impressive. I have been in the capital building of every state I’ve lived in except North Carolina. I need to go over to Raleigh. Never been to Raleigh.

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  8. That is the edge of the swamp that runs across the last section of my parent’s property. We used to take those wild grape vines and wind them into wreaths and then decorate them to give as presents. The worst thing in the water? Mosquito larvae. We do have warnings about deer ticks carrying Lyme’s disease, however, during the cold months that isn’t a concern and that is the time when we walk most often through the woods and swamp. In the spring and autumn it’s too wet (that was as far as I could get without getting wet and yet I wasn’t even close to the end of the property) and in the summer the mosquitoes are out in full force. There is actually a deer path right about where I was standing to take the picture – they are easy to see in the curly moss that coats the forest floor. Sadly, I frightened away the mallard ducks who were swimming in the swamp. Chas, the only snakes in these parts are the garter snakes, which are harmless. The only rattlesnakes in Ontario are found around Georgian Bay and the Bruce Peninsula along Lake Huron, which is several hours drive away from where my parents live.

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  9. I am of the opinion the above photo looks like a breeding ground for a nest of snakes. I also don’t know where you people hang out with your ticks and leeches and such but the more reputable hotels don’t have those sorts of things and having recently attended a trade show for Hospitality they have made great strides in controlling the bed bug situation.

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  10. Kim, I was not in a hotel but in my own bed. Presumably I took the tick to bed with me, but it was too picky about finding a spot to eat and just continued crawling around on me for a number of hours.

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  11. The property behind us is “wet”, thus the reason we have spent so much time installing drains in our back yard. We have to fight mosquitoes. Usually they don’t bite me as much as they do others but for some reason this year they have decided that I am a tasty treat. I was perfectly find with them not liking me.
    I have read that Victoria’s Secret Amber Body Spray is good for keeping bugs away much like Avon’s Skin So Soft. And lest you laugh about this, I heard it from a MAN. He uses it when he goes fishing. πŸ˜‰

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  12. Mumsee, yes, a small part of it is visible. The green cedars that are faintly visible in the background at the top right, are on the ‘island’ that the swamp surrounds, which we skate around, but there is more, much more. The swamp, and thus the skating rink, extends across several properties.

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  13. So, I think we’ve all gone and ruined that photo in our minds by now. πŸ™‚ Ticks, snakes and mosquitos …. Shudder.

    Someone took a photo out at our marina the other day of a rattler all curled up in the shade of a whale sculpture on one of the docks. I remember having an odd conversation with a rather volatile woman at the dog park some years ago — she was insistent that “someone” in authority needed to do “something” about all the rattlesnakes up at a popular dog walking trail nearby. But she was against outright killing them.

    Tongue-in-cheek, I asked if she meant something like a spay-neuter program. Why yes, she insisted, there should be some way to do that and someone ought to do that right now. She was really agitated.

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  14. Kim, your comment made me laugh. I was talking to my second sibling and I read it to her and she laughed too. We from the cold climates do not view nature as being so sinister as those from the warm climates. It was an adjustment in West Africa to learn to be very cautious about walking in tall grass or climbing trees (the snakes can climb them too – shudder). I’m used to walking through woods and swamp with nary a thought for what might be underfoot (now, large predators are a matter for more caution, but thus far they have not bothered us). I don’t know whether any of you have seen the memes on FB, but every so often, one of my relatives in Canada posts one – they usually have a picture of a venomous snake or alligator or other beast of warmer climates, with the caption, “This is why I live where the air hurts my face” (a reference to the fact that the cold winter air does indeed make your face ache).

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  15. It’s only 8:20 here and I feel like I’ve been apologizing all morning. Ever have one of those days?

    The firs thing I’ll have to do in a hour is apologize for the simplest Bible study I’ve ever studied: Philippians 2:18-25. I’ve got lots of prayer time planned to fill out a short discussion of Timothy and Epaphritus’ role in Paul’s life.

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  16. Stop it. Just stop it. Every one is off at some point in their lives. A simple Bible study could lead to a lot of discussion. Moderate, ask questions, and make sure everyone has a chance to say something.

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  17. When I see pics of northern climes, I don’t think of creepy crawlies. I think of cold water, cold water fish, birds, frogs, turtles, etc. I don’t think of snakes or ticks though I might think leeches. When I see a southern swamp, I think alligators and snakes and poisonous vapors and mosquitoes and…. I was quite concerned when we first moved down south. I was sure the trees were full of venomous snakes and things. I was right.

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  18. Ticks, though, are the worst, the scourge of the earth. They’re sneaky and do awful things to people and their pets.

    Do ticks have pets? I wonder what they are. Aphids maybe? Fleas? Microscopic critters?

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  19. So, son pointed out that every child in the class he might have graduated with, received a brand new car or truck for a graduation present from the parents. He would not have. He also commented that at least eighty percent of the graduates have never been expected to do their own laundry. He is expecting to pay his own way through college, all of the others will have their parents pay for it. He does not expect a new car or that we will start doing his laundry. He knows we will in a pinch but when he leaves here, those will be things in his can do pile.

    Husband was commenting that perhaps that is what is driving small families and the idea it costs so much to bring up a child.

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  20. Mumsee, I’ve thought that for a while. The expectation that we “must” pay for college, a daughter’s wedding, maybe a car is a really big expense. When people say they “can’ afford” lots of children, I don’t think they’re generally thinking about food and clothes and one more pair of bunkbeds.

    I have a friend who has two (adopted) children, the older one, a daughter, now making them foolish choices. I’ve (mostly) bit my tongue through the years as she has told me about stopping at two different drive-thrus on the way home from church because the kids don’t like the same food, and otherwise bending over backward never to have her kids mad at her. Again and again I have thought every family should have at least four or five children, because we can’t afford to be so accommodating when we have several of them, and there’s enough work to do that pretty much everyone has to pitch in. I was raised in a large family (seven of us) and all my married siblings except the newest married have a total of five children in some combination (two have five by birth, two three by birth but then two more by adoption or by marrying someone with children). So marrying into a family with just two and a husband who came from just two is realizing how different large-family and small-family dynamics are. Neither is perfect, and my husband was never spoiled and neither are the girls . . . but the mindset is different. I prefer the large-family mindset, mostly. You know, if adult children are home for Christmas, wonderful, but if they aren’t someone else is, and life goes on.

    That isn’t to speak badly against people who can only have one or two children. It’s just to say there is a real difference, I prefer the large-family energy and dynamics and structure (and the fact that there’s a network of relationships), and when people deliberately choose just one or two it makes me sad because their kids will miss a lot (including the impossibility of having siblings of both sexes). But it probably also adds to the overhyped laziness and selfishness of the millennials, since most of them were reared in deliberately small families and weren’t expected to do much around the home, but did expect to have their living expenses fully funded until they were at least 22, maybe even 30 if they played the education game right.

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  21. Yes, we can have leeches, but in all the years I’ve walked through that swamp in rubber boots (and got plenty of soakers, as we call it when the water sloshes over the top of the boot) I’ve never seen a leech. They prefer certain kinds of water – a shady spot in a calm lake with lots of leaves and other debris on the bottom is a typical place to find leeches. But, yet again, I’ve swum in several lakes and ponds over the years and never encountered a leech. I’ve also waded barefoot in a couple of creeks, but the worst thing around moving water is blackflies – those bites make welts that bleed a little. The worst animal one might encounter in water around my childhood home is a snapping turtle – there is a deep pond along a nearby road which is referred to as the Snapping Turtle Pond. The water doesn’t stay in the swamp all year, and it is mostly dry by August, so turtles only pass through on their way to more permanent water.

    DJ, ticks are nasty creatures, as are mites. We don’t have Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever around here, and it has only been in recent years that Lyme’s disease has become an issue – some point to its appearance as evidence of what happens with global warming. Our physicians still aren’t accustomed to looking for Lyme’s, so it can be quite difficult to get a diagnosis – it is a bit like trying to get a diagnosis of a tropical disease, it isn’t the first or second or third thing they think of.

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  22. Peter, the tick’s ‘pets’ are actually the problem, not the ticks in and of themselves. They can carry certain nasty bacteria/viruses/parasites which cause the diseases – that is why they say if you have been bitten by a tick to bring the tick with you, to test if it is carrying a disease. Rather like the flea was just a carrier of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, and lice is just a carrier of Rickettsia prowazekii, which causes typhus. In recent years, there has been some problems with head lice in public schools, and some indignant parents tried to claim it was unfair when their children were sent home until the lice was cleared up. One radio program even interviewed an ‘expert’ who tried to claim that lice was a harmless insect. The survivors of WWII could have told them different, as typhus was the prevalent epidemic that accompanied that war.
    There, did that make you all itchy enough πŸ˜‰

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  23. The only leeches I have actually ever encountered were in a fast flowing mountain stream. We were backpacking and put our cold stuff in the snow melt stream. Some kind of lunch meat, in sealed packages. Next morning, it had leeches in it. We brushed them off and ate our food.

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  24. Mumsee, say it isn’t so.

    I have only seen leeches once. They are unforgettable. I went to a park south of Atlanta with my long time boyfriend. We went into a creek where I waded, but he sat down, probably on some of those nice smooth large stones in creeks, and all of a sudden he jumped up and was getting the leeches off of himself. It was about the worst thing I had ever seen. They looked like little black snails, and none had time to attach. But the thought of it, and remembering how people once used leeches for medical purposes was almost enough to make me faint.

    I am sorry to bring up the subjects of ticks and leeches. Living in an urban area means I have very little experience with such things.

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  25. Mumsee will live to a ripe old age and be perfectly healthy until she draws her last breath.
    How do I know that? The above post where she brushed the leeches off and ate the meat anyway. I was there just after she skinned the snake and cooked it for the children to eat. All of this turns my stomach and makes me gag. Mumsee has immunity. I on the other hand who only eat food from a grocery store that hasn’t been tainted (that I know of) do not have the natural immunity that she does and will probably die a slow, lingering, painful death from some common infection that has built up a resistance to antibiotics. Mr. P and my ex mother in law will also live forever because they will both eat stuff that has been in the refrigerator for 2 or 3 weeks. I won’t eat it after 3 days.

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  26. Disgusting lawn post***you may want to stop reading now***
    Still with me? So the latest in “fertilize” because I sent my husband to buy sterilized cow manure for the lawn. (If you just get un-sterilized cow manure it is full of weed seeds and they will take over your lawn). Instead he came back with sterilized human waste that is the latest, greatest in lawn care fertilize. None of the harsh bomb making chemicals. He spread it Saturday and I have to agree the lawn is starting to look a little greener and better, but you can’t stand to be out there. That *stuff* stinks to high heaven. Thank you Sweet Baby Jesus that he didn’t decide to put it in the back yard too. I can hardly make it to the mail box holding my breath.
    He is currently on his way to Lowes to buy more lawn stuff.

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  27. Had to laugh. Here’s how Cheryl ended one comment, & Roscuro began the very next one. . .

    “But it probably also adds to the overhyped laziness and selfishness of the millennials, since most of them were reared in deliberately small families and weren’t expected to do much around the home, but did expect to have their living expenses fully funded until they were at least 22, maybe even 30 if they played the education game right.”

    roscuro | April 25, 2017 at 1:40 pm
    “Yes, we can have leeches. . .”

    πŸ˜€

    Liked by 3 people

  28. I bought my son a car when he was in high school. He kept being dramatic and telling me he could not ride the bus because that is where all the drugs are. The car cost me 100 dollars, but it ran and he made it to school. I imagine using that car taught him a lot. He had transportation and did not care how it looked.

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  29. Normally, the catkins grow too high on the pussywillow for me to be able to get a good picture, but a high wind storm caused two large sections of the willow to break off. The broken sections produced catkins anyway.

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  30. Nice, Roscuro.

    Jo, when my husband got a new car a year or so before we met, he saved the older one for the girls. It’s ugly, greenish gray with rust. One drove it until she bought her own–just in time for her older sister to need it. Now we’ll sell it.

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  31. Aren’t leeches still occasionally used by medical professionals? I’m pretty sure maggots are. (Shuddering thinking of either one.)

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  32. Cars.

    We bought a new pickup twenty five years ago. We used it. I drove across the country to Georgia, up to New York, and back across the country in it, pulling a trailer. First son used it and said it was on its last legs so bought himself a new car (it was stolen the third day he had it and he had to replace it). The truck went to second son. He used it and drove to Arizona when he went to college at Embry Riddle, then back home. He said it was on its last legs so he got himself a real truck. Third son used it and drove it around the mountains in his forest service job before going into the Air Force to pay back his schooling when he dropped out. He said it was on its last legs for sure and bought himself a real car. We drove it for years and then more children drove it and bought themselves real cars. I used it for my camping vehicle for years. Now it is supposed to be my trash truck for taking garbage to the dumpster, but son uses it as he parks his BMW that he bought it because the truck is on its last legs.

    We bought a used Subaru and drove it for years. Daughter used it when she was a student at Pensacola Christian College and then drove it back home, on its last legs. We drove it for years and several more children drove it. One drove it too fast and rolled it, we no longer have it but we still have the son. They each replaced it with their own car since it was on its last legs.

    We have gone through eleven children and have yet to buy any of them a car, let alone a new one. But they all have managed. If they wanted a car, they could figure out how to buy one. And they figured out how to keep gas in it. And title it. And license it. And insure it. Some will never learn to drive and that, too, is okay.

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  33. Kizzie, leeches are only used for a few very specific purposes, usually to do with skin and tissue grafts (the explanation for why they work is technical and involves anatomical detail most people don’t want to hear). They are bred in labs, so that they aren’t carrying any diseases; the same with medical maggots. The medical maggots are used to clean certain types of ulcers. Basically, both measures are used in cases where other options aren’t working.

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  34. The two youngest can make a wide range of things for breakfast. Cold cereal, hot cereal, pancakes, eggs, etc. Lately, it has been milkshakes. Today was carrot, apple, blackberries, and goat milk. They love it. I love it. Life is good. Have I mentioned I love my life?

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  35. I’m glad I wasn’t around to join this conversation. I don’t know nothing about no leeches.
    Now I know more than I want to know.

    πŸ˜†

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Other than what I know from keeping up with the prayer thread, I have no idea what’s going on with all you blog friends. I’ll catch up with you in a few weeks . . .

    But I’m pretty sure this is #62. πŸ™‚

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  37. Roscuro @ 2:08- yes, I know all that. I was just playing on words, being tongue in cheek. I like to take the English language and its quirks and have a little fun with them. Please realize that I do that often, so you don’t need to respond seriously to such posts.

    And take no offense at this response.

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