9 thoughts on “News/Politics 4-25-17

  1. Good piece on the media and politics

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/04/25/media-bubble-real-journalism-jobs-east-coast-215048

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    How did big media miss the Donald Trump swell? News organizations old and new, large and small, print and online, broadcast and cable assigned phalanxes of reporters armed with the most sophisticated polling data and analysis to cover the presidential campaign. The overwhelming assumption was that the race was Hillary Clinton’s for the taking, and the real question wasn’t how sweeping her November victory would be, but how far out to sea her wave would send political parvenu Trump. …

    What went so wrong? What’s still wrong? … No news organization ignored the Clinton emails story, and everybody feasted on the damaging John Podesta email cache that WikiLeaks served up buffet-style. Practically speaking, you’re not pushing Clinton to victory if you’re pantsing her and her party to voters almost daily.

    …. The answer to the press’ myopia lies elsewhere, and nobody has produced a better argument for how the national media missed the Trump story than FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver, who pointed out that the ideological clustering in top newsrooms led to groupthink. “As of 2013, only 7 percent of [journalists] identified as Republicans,” Silver wrote in March, chiding the press for its political homogeneity. …

    … But journalistic groupthink is a symptom, not a cause. And when it comes to the cause, there’s another, blunter way to think about the question than screaming “bias” and “conspiracy,” or counting D’s and R’s. That’s to ask a simple question about the map. Where do journalists work, and how much has that changed in recent years? To determine this, my colleague Tucker Doherty excavated labor statistics and cross-referenced them against voting patterns and Census data to figure out just what the American media landscape looks like, and how much it has changed.

    The results read like a revelation. The national media really does work in a bubble, something that wasn’t true as recently as 2008. And the bubble is growing more extreme. Concentrated heavily along the coasts, the bubble is both geographic and political. If you’re a working journalist, odds aren’t just that you work in a pro-Clinton county—odds are that you reside in one of the nation’s most pro-Clinton counties. And you’ve got company: If you’re a typical reader of Politico, chances are you’re a citizen of bubbleville, too. …

    The newspaper industry has jettisoned hundreds of thousands of jobs, due to falling advertising revenues. Dailies have shrunk sections, pages and features; some have retreated from daily publication; hundreds have closed. Daily and weekly newspaper publishers employed about 455,000 reporters, clerks, salespeople, designers and the like in 1990, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By January 2017, that workforce had more than halved to 173,900. Those losses were felt in almost every region of the country.

    … As newspapers have dwindled, internet publishers have added employees at a bracing clip. According to BLS data, a startling boom in “internet publishing and broadcasting” jobs has taken place. Since January 2008, internet publishing has grown from 77,900 jobs to 206,700 in January 2017. In late 2015, during Barack Obama’s second term, these two trend lines—jobs in newspapers, and jobs in internet publishing—finally crossed. For the first time, the number of workers in internet publishing exceeded the number of their newspaper brethren. Internet publishers are now adding workers at nearly twice the rate newspaper publishers are losing them.

    This isn’t just a shift in medium. It’s also a shift in sociopolitics, and a radical one. Where newspaper jobs are spread nationwide, internet jobs are not: Today, 73 percent of all internet publishing jobs are concentrated in either the Boston-New York-Washington-Richmond corridor or the West Coast crescent that runs from Seattle to San Diego and on to Phoenix. …

    … The old newspaper business model almost prevented this kind of clustering. Except for the national broadsheets—the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and increasingly the Washington Post—newspapers must locate, cheek by jowl, next to their customers, the people who consume local news, and whom local advertisers need to reach. …

    The business of a newspaper can’t really be separated from the place where it’s published. It is, or was, driven by ads for things that don’t travel, like real estate, jobs, home decor and cars. And as that advertising has gotten harder and harder to come by, local newsrooms have become thinner and thinner. …

    … Newspaper jobs are far more evenly scattered across the country, including the deep red parts. But as those vanish, it’s internet jobs that are driving whatever growth there is in media—and those fall almost entirely in places that are dense, blue and right in the bubble. …

    … Resist—if you can—the conservative reflex to absorb this data and conclude that the media deliberately twists the news in favor of Democrats. Instead, take it the way a social scientist would take it: The people who report, edit, produce and publish news can’t help being affected—deeply affected—by the environment around them. Former New York Times public editor Daniel Okrent got at this when he analyzed the decidedly liberal bent of his newspaper’s staff in a 2004 column that rewards rereading today. The “heart, mind, and habits” of the Times, he wrote, cannot be divorced from the ethos of the cosmopolitan city where it is produced. On such subjects as abortion, gay rights, gun control and environmental regulation, the Times’ news reporting is a pretty good reflection of its region’s dominant predisposition. And yes, a Times-ian ethos flourishes in all of internet publishing’s major cities—Los Angeles, New York, Boston, Seattle, San Francisco and Washington. The Times thinks of itself as a centrist national newspaper, but it’s more accurate to say its politics are perfectly centered on the slices of America that look and think the most like Manhattan. …
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  2. I also think that people are afraid to voice an opinion that is different from the more liberal view because the viscous comments and shaming if you do. I have 3 very liberal friends. I really cannot tell them what I think or they will pile on and I am the ignorant backwoods hick that never got our of god forsaken Alabama you poor thing you if only you knew what the rest of us do.

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  3. Something to keep in mind as tax breaks are discussed and Democrats tell you it’s a bad idea.

    The blood sucking leeches take too much already from those of us who actually have to pay taxes.

    http://legalinsurrection.com/2017/04/in-2017-americans-spending-more-on-taxes-than-food-clothing-and-housing-combined/

    “In 2017, Americans Spending More on Taxes Than Food, Clothing, and Housing Combined

    31% of the nation’s earnings are going to fill the tax coffers

    April 23rd of this year was Tax Freedom Day, or “the day when the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay its total tax bill for the year”.

    A whopping 31% of the nation’s earnings are confiscated by the government for federal and state taxes for a total of $5.1 trillion. Amazingly, that’s still not enough to pay off state and national deficits.”

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  4. The same, or a similar, figure was used last year about how much we pay in taxes. I have the same thought I had last year. If the 31% figure on taxes we pay is more than what we pay for food, housing, & clothing combined, that would mean that we pay less than 31% of our income for food, housing & clothing. That sounds too low for all of those combined.

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  5. Derek Jeter said when he retired that managing, or possibly owning an MLB team was in his future. Today he accomplished that, with his new partner Jeb Bush, winning the auction for the purchase of the Florida Marlins. 🙂

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mlb/report-derek-jeter-jeb-bush-led-group-wins-auction-for-marlins/ar-BBAmGvw?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=U452DHP

    ““A group led by former Florida governor Jeb Bush and former New York Yankees captain Derek Jeter have won the auction for the Miami Marlins baseball team, according to a person with knowledge of the deal,” Soshnick wrote. “The person requested anonymity because the sale contract hasn’t been signed. The person declined to say how much the group paid for the team, which is owned by New York art dealer Jeff Loria.”

    While no purchase price has been announced, it was reported earlier in the year that owner Loria had a deal in place to sell the franchise for $1.6 billion.

    Jeter wasn’t the only former MLB star to have thrown his name into this particular hat. Tom Glavine had teamed up with Mitt Romney’s son (politicians have some cash, by the way) in pursuit of the same goal.

    In the end, the Jeter/Bush combo reportedly proved too potent. The Bush family has gone down this road before, as former President George W. Bush owned the Texas Rangers from 1989-94.”

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