78 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 9-21-21

  1. Morning, Chas.
    Time for me to get some sleep as market day is an early day.

    Trying to figure out something to do over the four week Christmas break. all of our departments here shut down for two weeks and it will have been a year since I have gone anywhere. It is quite complicated since Australia is closed.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Good morning! The header photo is from the campus quad where live oaks are the most prominent part of the landscape. The land is very flat since it is near the coast. The weather was very pleasant and was no more humid than what we have here at this time of the year.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Morning! That is a beautiful tree with the hanging moss! I do miss the Carolinas!
    It is 30 degrees here this morning and we had a slight bit of rain last evening. I brought all the flowers into the basement that I could. 💐

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  4. Jo, if I had a spot of time like that to fill, I would probably invest in one of the inexpensive online recorded classes by Udemy, etc. I would try to learn or perfect a skill that could be used to better serve others and bring enjoyment to myself. Wesley got a start on his guitar lessons when he did not have to bother others with the clunky sounds of up front learning. Just a thought.

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  5. Good morning. Another beautiful day in the neighborhood. I need to head out to see if we got frost last night. We were not supposed to but supposed to and reality do not always line up.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. From a web search . . .

    “Native Americans told them the plant was called Itla-Okla, which meant “tree hair.” The French were reminded of the Spanish conquistadors’ long beards, so they called it Barbe Espagnol, or “Spanish Beard.” The Spaniards got their revenge by calling the plant Cabello Francés, or “French Hair.” The French name won out, …”

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I wish I could help you, RK.
    I have absolutely nothing to do.
    It has been busy around here. Some guys walking around outside in the rain. But they went away. Nothing hapened.
    So fart-so good.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I knew immediately the photo had to be somewhere in the SouthEast. Spanish Moss is a parasite, just like mistletoe. Most of it has been destroyed by the towns spraying for mosquitoes. When they realized what was happening they stopped spraying near it and not as often.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Miracle of miracles, Mr. P has been out walking with me twice this week. He can’t walk fast and he can’t walk far, but both mornings the app on my phone says we went .97 of a mile.

    Liked by 5 people

  10. This event up in the NE sounds wonderful for anyone available to attend.

    “We are less than two weeks away from our Leading The Way LIVE: New England event!

    As you may know, on October 1, I will preach an evangelistic message at the historic Moody Center in Northfield, MA, for a special in-person Leading The Way LIVE event. Grammy Award-winning worship artist Mac Powell will also be joining us for a powerful time of Gospel worship.

    As we prepare for this event, I long for your prayers!

    This is the very place where God worked through D.L. Moody to mobilize the modern missions movement — the region where the Second Great Awakening began — and I am praying that God will use this event to bring fresh spiritual revival in our land.

    If you are in the New England area, please sign up to join us. Tickets are FREE, but registration is required. If you are not in the New England area, please join me in prayer that God will use this event to encourage believers, draw lost souls to Christ, and ignite spiritual revival in our nation.

    It is the prayer of my heart that we will see a third Great Awakening in our nation in my lifetime. May this event be a spark for such a revival! Thank you for joining me in prayer.

    Blessings,
    Dr. Youssef’s Signature

    Michael Youssef, Ph.D.”

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  11. Yay for Mr. P.

    And teal is a nice color, very bold. As you all know, I’ve developed quite a love for that shade (which I more often refer to as turquoise) as it is such a nice contrast with the warm brick-brown color of the house exterior.

    I’d love to (really) learn Spanish one of these days — and get back to a guitar lesson.

    I spent some time sitting on the front porch after work yesterday catching up on some much-needed Bible reading (and was rewarded with the sweet visit of two of the fast-growing kittens from next door).

    Liked by 1 person

  12. DJ – I think of turquoise as being a shade or two lighter than teal. (Of course, I may be mistaken.)

    **********************

    How do you all pronounce “mauve”? I have heard it pronounced as having the ah or aw sound, as the spelling would seem to indicate, but I’ve also heard it pronounced with a long o sound.

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  13. Kizzie, it probably is, I’ve never really thought of the differences. But yes, turquoise is often a lighter shade, not as bold.

    “Turquoise is a shade of blue that lies on the scale between blue and green. It has characteristics associated with both of these, such as the calmness of blue and the growth that is represented in green. … Teal is a medium to deep blue-green color. It is made by combining blue and green pigments into a white base.”

    Liked by 2 people

  14. All that said, I’ll bet Michelle’s paint can has a much more interesting “name” for the color she’s using.

    I love paint names, how fun would it be to have a job branding those?

    Liked by 2 people

  15. I would put you to work peeling apples, Chas.

    I picked a bucket of sweet corn. I see the black beans are ready. LOTS of green tomatoes which need to hurry up and ripen

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  16. Trey and I saw a beautiful orange butterfly, whose wings were outlined in a periwinkle blue. Fall is my favorite season.

    Teal is a popular color. I wish I had that creative, decorative, painting gene. Sadly, it is one of the many helpful ones which I am missing.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Como una promesa, eres tú, eres tú
    Como una mañana de verano
    Como una sonrisa, eres tú, eres tú
    Así, así, eres tú
    Toda mi esperanza, eres tú, eres tú
    Como lluvia fresca en mis manos
    Como fuerte brisa, eres tú, eres tú
    Así, así, eres tú
    Eres tú
    Como el agua de mi fuente
    Eres tú
    El fuego de mi hogar
    Algo así eres tú
    Algo así como el fuego de mi hoguera
    (Eres tú) Algo así eres tú
    Mi vida algo así eres tú
    Como mi poema, eres tú, eres tú (Uh, eres tú)
    Como una guitarra en la noche
    Todo mi horizonte, eres tú, eres tú (Ah, ah, ah)
    Así, así, eres tú (Eres tú)
    Na, na, na, na
    Na, na, na, na
    Eres tú
    Como el agua de mi fuente
    Eres tú
    El fuego de mi hogar
    Algo así eres tú
    Algo así como el fuego de mi hoguera
    Algo así eres tú, uh (Eres tú)
    Mi vida algo así eres tú
    Algo así eres tú
    Algo así como el agua de mi fuente (Como el agua de mi fuente)
    Eres tú
    El fuego de mi hogar

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  18. Sorry — here’s the translation to 2:46. (I didn’t know it, either, just have always liked the melody and vocals since I first heard the song in the ’70s.)

    Like a promise, it’s you, it’s you
    Como una promesa, eres tú, eres tú

    Like a summer morning
    Como una mañana de verano

    Like a smile, it’s you, it’s you
    Como una sonrisa, eres tú, eres tú

    So, so, it’s you
    Así, así, eres tú
    All my hope, it’s you, it’s you
    Toda mi esperanza, eres tú, eres tú

    As fresh rain in my hands
    Como lluvia fresca en mis manos

    Like a strong breeze, it’s you, it’s you
    Como fuerte brisa, eres tú, eres tú

    So, so, it’s you
    Así, así, eres tú
    Are you
    Eres tú

    Like the water from my source
    Como el agua de mi fuente

    Are you
    Eres tú

    The fire of my home
    El fuego de mi hogar
    You are something like that
    Algo así eres tú

    Something like the fire of my bonfire
    Algo así como el fuego de mi hoguera

    (It’s you) Something like that is you
    (Eres tú) Algo así eres tú

    My life, something like that is you
    Mi vida algo así eres tú
    Like my poem, it’s you, it’s you (Uh, it’s you)
    Como mi poema, eres tú, eres tú (Uh, eres tú)

    Like a guitar in the night
    Como una guitarra en la noche

    All my horizon, it’s you, it’s you (Ah, ah, ah)
    Todo mi horizonte, eres tú, eres tú (Ah, ah, ah)

    So, so, it’s you (It’s you)
    Así, así, eres tú (Eres tú)
    Na, na, na, na
    Na, na, na, na

    Na, na, na, na
    Na, na, na, na
    Are you
    Eres tú

    Like the water from my source
    Como el agua de mi fuente

    Are you
    Eres tú

    The fire of my home
    El fuego de mi hogar
    You are something like that
    Algo así eres tú

    Something like the fire of my bonfire
    Algo así como el fuego de mi hoguera

    Something like that is you, uh (It’s you)
    Algo así eres tú, uh (Eres tú)

    My life, something like that is you
    Mi vida algo así eres tú
    You are something like that
    Algo así eres tú

    Something like the water from my source (Like the water from my source)
    Algo así como el agua de mi fuente (Como el agua de mi fuente)

    Are you
    Eres tú

    The fire of my home
    El fuego de mi hogar

    Liked by 1 person

  19. “Touch the Wind”

    [English translation]

    Like a promise, you are, you are
    Like a summer morning
    Like a smile, you are, you are
    Like that, like that, you are

    All my hope, you are, you are
    Like fresh rain in my hands
    Like a strong breeze, you are, you are
    Like that, like that, you are

    [Chorus:]
    You are like the water of my source
    (Something like that, you are)
    You are like the fire of my home
    You are like the fire of my bonfire
    You are like the wheat of my bread
    You are

    Like a poem, you are, you are
    Like a guitar in the night
    My whole horizon, you are, you are
    Like that, like that, you are

    [Chorus]

    Touch the wind

    Liked by 1 person

  20. She’s so bored she did an entire powerpoint presentation for me on different ideas for the room. It’s too overwhelming for me, so I left it to her. Now I find myself shopping for a teal rug and now a gray chair.

    I just bought a bookshelf (more my type of furniture) from a shop going out of business. We’ll either paint it teal or gray, or stick it in the giggle room and get rid of that cheap pine bookshelf I bought in 1981 and moved all over the country.

    I think.

    We’ll see.

    (In good news, it looks like she may get a job offer in the next few weeks).

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I hate to break it to you, Michelle, but my personal designer said gray is on the way out. This was when I complained that I could not find anything but gray inspired accessories for my bathroom.

    My bathroom in a bright turquoise. I asked Designer Girl to pick out a shade that would go with the ship ballast balls my grandson found in Alaska and gave to me. I did a lighthouse theme using three small lighthouses which had been my mom’s. One is mounted on rocks and driftwood and is totally ‘her.’ Plus, we have lighthouse keeper’s in my dad’s family history. I have a picture of a lighthouse which is where one of my dad’s uncle’s drown while working at that lighthouse. The most important is the spiritual idea of a lighthouse pointing the way to safety. The photographer, who took the lighthouse picture, also had a picture of rocks formed into a cross underwater. She did not form the rocks into a cross, but came across it on one of her photo shoots. It goes nicely with the lighthouse photo (both on canvas), the ballast balls and some polished agates in a shell.

    The only issue with the bathroom is the floor which has an issue. We are going on year three of getting the bathroom finished from when we first asked it to be done. I am not worrying about it anymore. I am not happy to have to have the vanity taken out to do that. That means taking the faucet off and counter top, of course. Just a plain pain, but nothing to cry too much about.

    It is nice to decorate as you like, in spite of the trends. It can be difficult to get the accessories, however. Kind of like with clothes. Building colors follow clothes color trends generally.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. It has been a number of years since I selected a very light gray with white trim for the walls at the office. I thought the color would be nice on the eyes in an office full of small print with numbers. I lucked up with being on trend without realizing it. My choice was more a practical matter than fashionable.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. The problem with heavily following the latest trends is that they go out of style, and what you’re left with can end up seeming really out-of-style or even tacky. I say “heavily” there because I don’t mean that we shouldn’t have anything trendy at all.

    However, there are some who can afford to switch up their wall colors and curtains and such fairly frequently, and enjoy doing so. That’s not me, though. 🙂

    Aqua seems to me to have a bit more of a greenish tint than teal and turquoise.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. My one neighbor said her daughter-in-law tells her that her bathrooms are outdated. I hadn’t thought about it (and having been in the bathrooms often anyway), but I did notice when I took a shower over there during my house mess that I could kind of see what she meant, although the decor and style suits the homeowner. She went for a french something (provincial?) look, can’t remember the term she used, but it’s somewhat fussy and girly, I guess you’d say. I think there’s carpet in there, as I recall, and a lot of “fluff.” But popular maybe a couple decades ago? And she still likes it.

    I’m hoping my 1922 style is more timeless, it matches the house era and while it was sort of a popular look in recent years, I don’t think it will ever look out of place in a 1922 house. Very plain and straight forward, lots of white tile, white beadboard and black tile accents.

    But I’m sure someone else someday will tear everything out — maybe the house itself as the lot is a good size and with our more lax zoning laws now could sport quite a few more “residences” on the property. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  25. French Provencial was popular in the late 50’s early 60’s. My mother and her first husband must have walked into a furniture store and bought the “rooms” already together. The only piece of furniture not French Provincial was my bedroom furniture when is hard rock maple and on the smaller side. I still have her china cabinet and I bought a table that had been painted white in the same stile to have under the TV. It is sofa seat height and has “wings” that fold out to make it larger.
    I have always had “previously loved” inherited from someone furniture for most of my life. Mr. P and I have bought some furniture–The dining room table and chairs–his mother’s china cabinet and some other low pieces that I use to serve from. I bought a new sofa and club chair that rocks with an ottoman. Then he had to have a chair and a half monstrosity of a recliner for after he had surgery on his knee last year. It doesn’t match nor blends with anything. I have the round chop block that my dad had. We bought a sideboard, table, and four chairs from an antique mall where whatever is under they white “distressed” paint is probably ruined pieces of furniture. In the playroom that used to be the sunroom there is a toy box that was made for BG, my little girl play table and doll highchair and my mother’s rocker that my dad refurbished when BG was born. He went to the stockyard, bought the cowhide, and tanned it himself. It stunk for a year!!!!
    My secret fantasy is to put a sign in the yard that says Estate Sale and have people come in and make me an offer.
    We got a new roof. Now the interior and exterior need to be painted. Then a new fence, then some landscaping in the back. Guess I will just keep the furniture I have.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. ¿DJ quiere aprender español? ¡Qué bueno!

    I could have translated that song, but you found it already. As for the differences, translation is part interpretation, as some words have different meanings. I love the nuances of language!

    And who cares what color a bedroom is other than the person who sleeps in it? I’m glad grey is on the way out. When we painted our bedrooms, we went with what we like.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. I have a dark brown round table that has four captain type chairs that are all scratched up. Since moving my grandparent’s big homemade table out over the weekend, the round table gets to be in the dining room area. I had mentioned to a friend the possibility of painting the brown table and chairs white. She said no because she thinks the ‘paint everything white’ trend will soon be out of style. She suggested refinishing in the same brown to get rid of the scratches. Opinions? I don’t have anything it has to match. We are eclectic here.

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  28. Pretty certain I have never followed a trend. In my late teens I sort of attempted to but it was a failure and I am fine with that. So, my house looks the way I want it. As some can attest to. Though our guest room faucet now has water.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Oh, the colorful appliances, yes. My mom was thrilled to get a bronze-colored washer and dryer in the 1970s.

    I use the old pine “kitchen table” from Iowa — from when my mom was growing up — as my dining table. It’s small-is but it’s all I need.

    And, after deciding that the smallish antique mis-matched chairs from home lacked enough comfort for sitting any longer than maybe 10 minutes at a time, I bought 4 painted, colorful Mexican wood chairs to go with the Iowa table just in the past several months, I love those chairs. They’re so festive, fun, and solid, imported from Mexico — and not very expensive. I’m casual so they work perfectly. I had to throw faux leather cushions on the seats which have no padding, but that’s OK.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Twenty four year old daughter took the oak dining room table (bought used at an auction thirty years ago) out to refinish it. I had done it the last two times and she got as far as sanding it. I believe I will have fifteen do it. As mentioned, he marches to a different drummer, but what he does, he does extraordinarily well and I think that would be right up his alley. Color blind as he is.

    Sadly, I gave the cane back chairs to a friend who said her husband wanted to recane them and we never got them back. But we have managed to sit down for meals since.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Just got off a long phone interview with the state’s environmental board reps about port congestion and pollution — during which the can persisted in knocking things off counters, causing too much disruption.

    Cats.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Cane-backed chairs are nice.

    I remember we needed new dining chairs and my dad was in charge with finding them. Not sure if this was used or not, but he came back with the low-backed captain’s style wood chairs which my mom wasn’t too keen on. (My dad loved them.) But they worked out and stayed with us through the years.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Our furniture is quite eclectic. In the dining room, we have the table and chairs that Hubby and I bought over 20 years ago before we moved into this house, a china cabinet that had been given to his grandmother when she married (c. 1917 or 1918), and the hutch my parents bought when I was young.

    The living room has some furniture that Hubby and I bought over the years, with a coffee table that had been his mom’s (seems to be from the 1950s) and a small bookcase from my mom sitting next to the larger bookcase we bought. And the lovely rug that Nightingale bought me. (Technically, the couch, loveseat, and pretend woodstove were my own purchases after Hubby’s death.)

    There are similar combinations in the other rooms. 🙂

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  34. Mine are the low backed ones, too, dj. They are very comfy since we are not tall people. They are similar to comfort food. In general they make you feel good; they are nothing fancy, and they slightly wrap around as if giving nice hug.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. My kitchen, which we did in 2017, is a dark teal. The adjoining dining room is a pale version, but NOT mint.

    I pronounce it ‘m-oh-ve’

    I would love some comfortable wood chairs for my dining table, but making do with hand me downs which look okay.

    Liked by 2 people

  36. Janice – I’d be willing to try them if somebody else made them, but I think I’d prefer to stick to plain unfried deviled eggs. I’m sure they taste good, but I don’t need new ways to add extra calories to my diet. I can do that all by myself! 😀

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  37. Talk about eclectic furniture! We’re using a Formica topped table with maple legs my mom bought when she worked at Montgomery Wards 60 years ago. The chairs were gone years ago, and we had a carpenter friend stabilize the rickety legs 305 years ago. The chairs we have are a mixture of wooden chairs, some from my MIL’s old set, some from who-knows-where.

    Our living room has a divan and arm chair from Mrs L’s great grandfather’s house (over 100 yrs old) which we had reupholstered 15 years ago, and another arm chair that was her grandfather’s. It’s about 70 years old. Also, an antique writing table from her great aunt and some other more “modern” things, more than 40 years old. The newest piece would be the recliner we got at the Salvation Army thrift store.

    Yeah, we’re not slaves of fashion around here.

    Liked by 2 people

  38. 305 years ago.

    How old are you, Peter?

    I love mix and match and eclectic furniture, too — and most of my furniture also is from family years past; when I’ve bought for myself, it’s typically from antique or 2nd hand places — but I did buy leather-upholstered living room furniture maybe 10-15 years ago with the intention that I’d never have to replace it.

    Barring a destructive new dog someday, I am hoping that plan holds.

    I love having my dad’s hall table that he made in high school wood shop (my mom’s friend in Iowa kept that for her in her basement until she could arrange to get it sent out to California, now I have it next to the front door right under the mail slot).

    I have my grandfather’s old trunk + another trunk from an ancestor whose name was written on one of the wood braces (when I had it restored I made sure the guy kept that visible).

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Re Kare’s teal kitchen — i’ve found myself loving the teal (or green?) pieces that you see on some of the sets on NCIS New Orleans. I’m guessing it’s an NO kind of style, old things in bright and unexpected colors?

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  40. I am from the Deep South where we laugh that I’d you can’t fry it; spray paint it gold.
    Those eggs are a no from me. I hardly fry anything because you smell the grease for days. Now, I’m not opposed to eating something someone else fried.

    Liked by 1 person

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