72 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 3-10-21

  1. Good morning! Our plan today is to head to the east side of the state to visit my mom. We’ve had snow every time I had a day to go visit, so am looking forward to it.

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  2. Morning! We woke up to a half inch of fresh snow on the ground…where’d that come from?!
    Pretty bird up there…I have never had one for dinner….

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  3. Good morning! It’s another fine spring day in Atlanta.
    I have my Bible study in a little bit. I am drinking coffee and just finished my online Bible study. Double duty Bible study today.

    I think for a few weeks I may be trying to memorize the Roman’s Road to Salvation verses. The first verse is Roman’s 3:23: “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.”

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  4. Mumsee: I don’t have a favorite food. I just eat what’s there. You can tell by looking that I’m not much about eating. I’ve been underweight all my life.
    Had to go on a diet to pass the physical exams for getting into the AF, then for Flying.
    Still scrawny, but unbelievably healthy for a 91 year old man.

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  5. I miss her so much. During the last years, she didn’t contribute much to our social life. But I still miss he.
    I’ve said a dozen times before:
    When I first saw her, I wrote her name in my Bible.
    I was holding her hand when she died.

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  6. Yes, you are blessed to have someone you miss so much, Chas. Holding you up in prayer as you walk the path of grief right now.

    I have eaten partridge. My dad used to hunt it along with so many other animals. I haven’t had it for years and seldom see them anymore. My mom always told the story of my nephew, who lived next door to my parents when he was a child. He went to pick up the mail for my folks and came running into the house shouting that he saw a “Christmas bird” and they should come and look. Turns out is was a partridge. My folks got such a kick out of him calling it a Christmas bird. It makes sense with the red and green coloring. Children often bring such joy when they share their view of things around them.

    Janice, we once had a pastor who had a challenge to memorize the Roman’s Road. My daughter (who was being homeschooled for second grade) and I memorized it. Actually, we were the first to recite it to the pastor. I cannot recite it right now. This daughter also memorized 1 Cor. 13. I have no idea how much of either she remembers. I could recite 1 Cor, 13, although I do all reciting better in my head than out loud. Nerves can get to me when doing it for others. I often go through different passages when I awake in the night. If I stumble I may go over them again during my prayer time the next morning.

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  7. I remember when we all memorized 1 Cor 13, and we were to insert our own name where love was. “mumsee is patient and kind…..” Hmmm. Needs review.

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  8. This reminds me of a story I read in an old San Francisco Chronicle column–which was laminated and posted at a restaurant we visited on the coast.

    Herb Caen discussed a little girl winning an essay contest. This was her entry:

    “The Quail. The quail is the state bird of California. It wears a little hat and likes to run around. It is on the menu of the Little River Inn.”

    I laugh every time I remember that earnest young writer. We had something else for dinner that night. 🙂

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  9. See, here it is Wednesday already.

    We had some nice rain through the night, more to come late today and tonight again; meanwhile, we have some sunshine, but it is chilly out.

    I was talking to someone yesterday who suggested we have an in-person interview for the story I’m doing with her as she wants to show me around a building they’ve purchased (for a low-cost veterinarian service).

    How nice, now that I’m vaccinated, to not have to think twice about saying ‘sure.’

    We’re on our way to herd immunity (we hope?), the numbers are ramping up, albeit slowly. What a year.

    A friend posted yesterday that this was the last “normal” week for us a year ago — and who could have even fathomed what was in store.

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  10. As a child, my mother had a hat with pheasant feathers she found of which she was very proud. We have them in our woods but they are a rare sight. And they are probably fewer in number because of the coywolves. Scattered shot is a hazard with eating wild turkey too, which I have had. I have also had venison, bison, caribou (while in Nunavut) and bear. While we do not hunt, we have friends who do and who like to share. Bear is quite similar to beef in texture.

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  11. My hubby insists that he doesn’t have a favorite food and will eat whatever is put in front of him.
    Can someone remind me again of the email for submitting pictures here? Thanks!

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  12. Mumsee, “not a risk” presumably assumes no one else ever hunted that bird and didn’t give it enough shot to kill it . . .

    I’ve had wile turkey with the warning “Be careful.” I thought it was really good, but reminded me more of a ham than of turkey. It’s actually the only wild game I’ve ever eaten! My late brother-in-law used to fish for bass, but he’d throw most of them back. One time I told my sister I’d never eaten fish caught by a fisherman (well, unless at a restaurant or purchased . . . but never a fisherman I knew), and she said if she had known that she would have served me some in the days they used to keep it in their freezer. But I’ve never eaten venison, rabbit, or anything else that is hunted.

    For a while we had a store near us that had cuts of several wild meats, and I told my husband that someday I’d like to buy one instead of going to a restaurant (since the price of the meat was high). Then the store went out of business, and we found out on closing day and not in advance, so I lost my chance.

    When I was younger I didn’t want to try venison, cuz “Bambi,” and I still don’t want to eat food that looks like an animal (lobster, for instance), but I’d be interested in trying venison or elk or most any other wild meat.

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  13. I had rabbit, as a small child on a homeschooling group outing (in the early elementary years, before ATI, my mother was part of a group of homeschooling families who went together on ‘school trips’), but it was raised for meat, not wild. Tasted like chicken to me. I have had lobster, and all the various assorted shellfish (scallops, oysters, mussels, clams, crab), as, while visiting relatives in Nova Scotia, we always take advantage of the fresh harvest of the sea; but never had to remove them from their shells. The aunt we usually stay with there would get the live lobster to cook, but she shelled it before serving.

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  14. I was not a Christian and attended SS sporadically as a child. I did not memorize all those scriptures you are talking about.
    i.e. To me, I Cor. 13 is just another chapter of scripture.

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  15. Tweet from one of our former Assemblymen:

    ~ Longtime followers know that I predicted in Jan 2020 that the world was not taking Covid seriously enough. Now I believe most people are underestimating how fast progress is being made against it. ~

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  16. DJ, the community where I work has had to lock back down because a group of college and university students decided to have a party. It let loose the British variant, which more infectious, and of course, the infected students had been other places after the gathering. The community is livid, and both university and college are threatening expulsion to those who knowingly broke the rules.

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  17. I never really memorized scripture as a child either, Chas. I did memorize The Lord’s prayer, the creed, ten commandments and such. My children memorized in both Awana and school and some at home. Memorizing can enhance meditation and sanctification or it can be meaningless or used for evil purposes. We always hope it will be used for good.

    I have eaten bear, rabbits and other game. I have also eaten a lot of fish caught on lines, although not a lot caught by me. Venison tastes very different depending on what the deer are eating. Those near lots of fields are far better than those grazing mostly in the forests or swamps. My husband grew up on venison and was not one to want to eat it anymore. My dad and uncles always made sausage out of it. My SIL often has that made when he has the deer butchered.

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  18. I have eaten a variety of meats, but like with people, I am not that good at telling them apart. They all taste like rattle snake. Well, maybe not the horse. But the bear and cougar and white tail and mule deer and elk and moose all tasted like the horse. So I guess it was just the chicken and turkey and pheasant and partridge and guinea fowl and frog legs that tasted like rattle snake.

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  19. Linda, no, I didn’t get that at all from the tweet — mainly that trying to predict this virus, both coming and going, has not been always easy. His remark also comes at a time in our state when this all is quite the fierce debate (what to reopen and when). Many of our counties, including LA, have been stuck in the most-restrictive tier but appear to be ready to move into the next tier down; schools are looking to reopen, case numbers are going down (which is a surprising thing to see here, frankly).

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  20. I remembered to look while I was out doing chores, our jeep is a Jeep Cherokee Laredo. Canceled. But that is okay, we bought it for five hundred dollars, daughter used it for a year, and still does when it is wintery. It had a wire running from the door to the carburetor or wherever since the ignition did not work, but it melted. The ignition has since been replaced and our butcher wants to buy it for seven hundred and it will keep on trucking.

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  21. There’s just a lot of back-and-forth right now among health officials and others about where this virus is (or isn’t) going right at this time. It’s like reading tea leaves. Guess time will tell.

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  22. Chas, 1 Cor 13 is called the love chapter because it describes attributes of love. We were supposed to use it to look at ourselves and see where we might need to work a bit toward being nicer. I think.

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  23. I never was able to memorize scripture as a child and had little hope I could ever. But then I was asked to help teach Bible Drill, and I found I was able to do it when it became fun. And I had learned that I could memorize it as a song even before doing Bible Drill.

    I have eaten dove, quail, and venison. It was all good. I never had turtle soup but wondered if I would like it, and frog legs sound interesting, too. Lobster tail in the shell is wonderful when dipped in clarified butter, and I used to broil the whole gutted trout with the head on. There is a good pop out timer on the head to let you know when it is done. I know that it sounds gross, but hungry folks who understand that the fish was given as sustenance don’t revere body parts of the dead animal.

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  24. I find it fun to have to pull the chunks of lobster meat out from the tail, like toiling for the meal, similar to having to shell roasted peanuts to get the tasty portion out of the gift wrapping.

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  25. I memorized all my Sunday School verses, and all my Awana book passages – I was going for the Timothy Award you got at the end of all the levels, but didn’t stay long enough in Awana due to my parents changing churches, I did get the other two awards before the Timothy Award, whose names I cannot remember (I no longer have either). Then, in ATI, I worked through their memorization list. Matthew 5-7 and Romans 6-8. I went on and memorized I John, James, Galatians (while memorizing that book, I began to suspect ATI had it wrong doctrinally), and Ephesians. I got to the eighth chapter of the gospel of John before I realized that rote memorization wasn’t really helping me to remember Scripture longterm. During our ATI years, we had, as a family, read the book of Proverbs through every month, and I could quote more Proverbs at appropriate times than I could recall the whole chapters and books I had memorized by rote. So, I switched tactics and read through the Bible repeatedly, reading through it in a year, then in six months, then in three months, until I lost count. Sure enough, I now recall far more about the Scripture than when I concentrated on being able to quote chapters in their entirety. Now I proceed at leisure through the Bible, sometimes reading multiple chapters in a sitting, sometimes just one, and sometimes just looking up a passage I recalled and want to reread.

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  26. There are many ways to memorize. I did a few verses, 1 Cor 13, and then several via songs like the 2nd Chapter of Acts sang. They have all kept me in good stead, as well as reading through repeatedly and learning it that way. All had positives. And God brings it back when He wants to.

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  27. Janice: Don’t you enjoy unwrapping the foil from around chocolate? Well, no, actually, I’m very impatient about food. Give me my peanuts already shelled! 🙂

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  28. That is one of my favorite books: Heaven. My daughter just bought it, not realizing I have been giving those away for years.

    I have heard several of those lies, the harps on the clouds show up in comics a lot.

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  29. I enjoy the roasted peanuts in their shells at places like Texas Road House, or at least I use to, but I never could get use to the thought of throwing the empty shells on the floor. I also grew up with having to shell boiled peanuts. Maybe it is a Southern thang.

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  30. I just caught up with yesterday’s discussion about the quote from the article Michelle sent, “If your ungodly neighbors aren’t angry at your for being righteous, you’re probably not.”

    There is a difference between saying that the godly will be hated and saying that everyone will hate the godly. While it is true that we have been promised persecution as believers, that’s very different from saying that every unbeliever will persecute.

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  31. I enjoy shelling walnuts, we have a walnut tree. But when I bake, I tend to use the already shelled ones. Husband shells them for me! And when he is in a hurry, he pulls them out of the pantry, purchased shelled.

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  32. Cheryl calls her mother in law, “mom”. I think that is a good thing. What do your children in law call you? What do you want to be called?

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  33. My father’s three sons in-law all call him by the name his peers call him. He is fine with that, as he was the one who instructed his first son in-law, Eldest in-law, to do so. Eldest in-law very sweetly asked permission of my mother to adopt an affectionate version of Mother that we sometimes called our mother by. Both he and Second in-law now address my mother by that affectionate motherly term. Youngest in-law addresses her by her first name. My mother is not one to stand on her own dignity, but she was hurt that Youngest in-law did not address her by the motherly term, not because she felt it was disrespectful to be addressed by her first name, but because she felt it showed that she was not held in the same warm motherly regard by Youngest in-law that her other two sons in-law showed to her.

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  34. Becky started calling me “Da” because she couldn’t say “dad”, which she herd her father (Chuck) call me. It has stuck. Not my favorite, but grown men and women now refer to me as “Da”. Elvera was “Nana”.

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  35. My first sister-in-law married into the family at 19, and apparently never had that discussion about what to call Mom and Dad, so she never called them anything; she’d just talk to them. Three years later my oldest brother married, and his wife said Mom and Dad readily. The other sister-in-law (younger, but an earlier member of the family) once said, “Mom” and then giggled, and then after that she was able to call them the family names.

    My girls call me my first name. I’d rather have a different name for them, but realistically don’t know what it would be. When our older daughter was getting married, my husband told her that her husband-to-be could call him “Dad” if he wanted to. She said he wouldn’t want to (and I don’t know whether the permission got passed on). Somewhere in there I realized I really didn’t want us to be “Dad and Cheryl” to my son-in-law (stepmother-in-law . . . yikes!). And I realized that if my daughter called another woman (her mother-in-law) “Mom” but didn’t call me that, it would probably make me a bit sad. So it works that they have chosen not to go that route. Don’t know what will happen if/when our younger daughter marries.

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  36. Question for those of you who make bread: We ordered a cast iron Dutch oven, which has now arrived, and in the next day or two I’m looking to make another loaf of the no-knead bread, but this time I want to put fixings in it. I’m looking at adding cinnamon like I did the first time, but also adding walnuts and cranberries. The dough rises 12-18 hours. Do I put the mix-ins in when I mix the dough and then let them “rise” along with the dough, or do I stir them in when I’m ready to make the bread the next day?

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  37. I just emailed all my tax documentation to the tax guy, that was so easy compared to spending 1/2 a day with a personal appointment (counting a fairly long commute).

    We’ve had an off-and-on rainy day with more to come overnight, then it should be clear, though they’re saying ‘maybe’ some rain next week. At one point today I couldn’t tell what that sound was,I was working in the den/back room/’office’ and thought it sounded like wind (which we’ve also been getting) but I didn’t see any of the trees in the backyard swaying; then i noticed the downpour.

    Anyone read this piece about how hard this upcoming time change is on so many of us?

    https://world.wng.org/2021/02/daylight_saving_debate

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  38. I called my mother in law by her name or Nana.
    Paul’s children call me Kim and BG calls him Paul. Grandchildren call me MiMi and that’s all that really matters.
    🎤 🎵 MiMi finger MiMi finger where are you? Here my am here my am how do you do 🎵 🎶

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  39. I am Ginny to most of them, mumsee to one. I always called mine grandpa and grandma. It sounds very distant to me to have anybody call me by my first name. Weird, I know.

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  40. This weekend, eh? And I have been getting up at three thirty three days a week so I should be okay if I sleep until four thirty those days. But only a couple more weeks as daughter is planning to move. Though she may not.

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  41. My DIL calls me by name. I called my MIL, mum and all stepmothers, mom. The stepmothers I asked if I could call them mom (just to make sure). I was following the example of my parents who chose to call their stepmothers, mom.

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  42. I don’t think my husband ever calls me by my name. He probably does not even remember what it is. He calls me wife. He knows it causes great angst in some people. It amuses me to see the reactions.

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  43. It is Thursday here, but tomorrow is a National holiday for a day of mourning. So, folks, it is Friday for me. Not that I would brag, but there has to be an advantage somewhere.

    More covid here, so we may be going on a shutdown. oh, well…..

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  44. That is pretty late for you, Janice. But still early for me.
    Some of you will be up soon.
    Will daylight savings bring us closer?? Kevin seems to know.

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