66 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 2-22-21

  1. Looks like I’m on now.
    It’s over now. Everyone is back to whatever business they have and Elvera is forgotten by everyone but me.
    That is as it should be. Life goes on. And things need to get done.
    I know there is no marriage in Heaven. But I hope we know each other.
    I want her to know how important she was to me.

    The first time I saw her, I wrote her name in my Bible.
    I was holding her hand when she died.

    Now? jack to business.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Chas,

    She is not forgotten, and won’t be anytime soon. She left a mark on this world, with you, with her family, and with those like us who’ve gotten to know her. She will be remembered. 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

  3. Thank you, Chas, for feeling comfortable enough with us to express your true feelings of the moment. I think that extreme thinking about significance of a loved one who has passed probably bounces around while processing grief until time passing allows for balanced settling of thoughts. Elvera meant more to you than she did to anyone else on earth, but she sure meant a lot to your son and the rest of the family. Of course she meant a lot to us here and to her church lady friends and their families. Those who are alive have not forgotten her. I remember my friends’ kind mothers. She matters to people you may not even remember. She holds a place in earth history, but even greater than that, she is written in God’s Book of Life. I am thinking she will be one to get many rewards in heaven. That is the ultimate significance.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Chas, have you ever read the book “Tortured for Christ”? It is written by Richard Wurmbrand. In it, he states that he and his wife have a plan to meet at one of the gates in new Jerusalem. He, too, knows there is no marriage in heaven, but looked forward to eternity with her.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. How does one “get over” the sweetest woman in the world? I think one doesn’t. But life does move on. She is content, happy, joyful. You hold the memories. And you will start to move forward again but she will always hold a place in your heart and memories as she will for Chuck and Linda and the grandchildren and even the great grands. We will remember her fondly though many never met her except through your words. As it should be. David claimed he would see his child again but not here. With these eyes we will see Him. We have such promises and assurances.

    Liked by 5 people

  6. Good Morning! The temps will rise to 50 this day! Some snow melting will begin and I will get out for a walk!
    Chas I remember Mom saying “the house is quiet” after Dad passed away. She would grow weary of scrambling his eggs and then she didn’t have to do that any longer. She yearned to make his meals once again. After the 63 years of living together there suddenly was a void. What once annoyed her about him she now longed for once again. So many emotions.
    You will get through this period. When you feel you don’t have the strength that is when our Lord will give to you His….and she will never be forgotten. We here will always remember TSWITW…and your love story…for one another and for our Lord Jesus.

    Liked by 5 people

  7. Chas, I listened to your granddaughter’s tribute to Elvera at the memorial, and know from just that that Elvera is not forgotten, but is rather dearly remembered.

    Moving forward with life doesn’t mean the dead are forgotten. I still remember my uncle and his wife, clearly and vividly at times, although they have both been dead for over a decade. It is the same with all my other friends and relatives who have gone before. They don’t get forgotten simply because I keep on living. Nor would they have wanted me to stop living – my uncle was deeply interested in my future, and concerned at the time I was caring for him in his last illness that I was putting my career on hold for him. He would have been delighted to see me go on to West Africa, as his heart was in missions and had himself been planning on spending the rest of his widowed life serving the Lord on the mission field, just as his now widowed son is seeking to do.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. This is an interesting and delightful article about the marvelously complex, yet simple reason for why there is such a variation in skin, hair and eye colour amount humans: https://answersingenesis.org/genetics/what-color-adam/

    It reminds me of the wonderful variety of skin colour I saw during my time in West Africa, including albinism. African albinos can be in great danger from superstition, but I think Islam had served to keep the darkest superstitions about albinism at bay where I was, so I met both child and adult albinos. The adults both the skin lesions that show how difficult it is for them to survive that intense sunlight so close to the equator. I will never forget the day a woman came to the newborn health clinic with her albino infant. She placed the infant in my arms and then went away for a while. I had to go through the clinic and find her again to give her back her child and we wondered if she had some thought of leaving her light skinned child with the light skinned strangers (who were perceived as affluent) – giving children to others to raise, especially when one already has several, is a cultural custom to try to provide adequate food and shelter for multiple children of polygamous households in an impoverished country.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. I can’t “like” the comments like I could before but I wanted to like several of them. TSWITW will always be remembered as will you. You have made a difference in MY life and she has through you. I chose to get married on a Sunday afternoon after church because of you.

    Liked by 6 people

  10. I like the idea of meeting at the gate. Can you imagine how many people will be there? But I am sure God has a system figured out and our eternity will be filled with surprises.

    Liked by 6 people

  11. I had a nice phone visit with my dad yesterday. They were watching the LA area golf tournament they watch every year. He is pleased that they have the five day event every year in honor of his birthday as he used to caddie there many years ago. Not really in his honor but it is a running joke of his. Clark Gable was one of his clients but dad caddied on his own time, not the player’s so he did not have any regulars. Back in the pre golf cart days. He is ninety one. She will be ninety six. He does not have any plans for if she passes on before him. His life is seeing that she is comfortable and happy as he has for the past thirty five years or so.

    Liked by 6 people

  12. I was trying to read up on that critical race theory stuff yesterday as it came up in church. The pastor and wife want to be messengers to the southern Baptist convention so they can vote against it. My theory is God made us all as image bearers and He made variety because variety is beautiful. He did not make races, we did. But I do not go down the road critical race theory seems to. I hope.

    Liked by 4 people

  13. Cheryl, your last comment from yesterday seems to me to limit how God speaks to us. Yes, the bible is not to be contradicted and everything is to be judged by it. However, God speaks to us in several ways. His word shows that and there is no reason to think he is limited to only his word today. I do listen for his voice. I have been surprise at times when he has interrupted my life to ‘speak’ to me. Yes, that particular way of God speaking is rare, but it happens. We can all be fooled and some people misuse that or misunderstand or think he is speaking when he is not. People misuse the bible perhaps most of all.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Like Kim. I hope we will know each other.
    We have all influenced each other in some way.
    Someday, we will know.
    I know there is no marriage in Heaven. But I want to tell her how important she was to me.
    And those of you on this blog now.
    Circumstances have made it so that you, this blog, is all that I have.
    In Hendersonville, I had the Lions and church.
    Here, I have been taken almost entirely with caring for her and have no one except whoever I could pull up on this blog.
    I do have Chuck& LindaS, and their clan. They come with the title (Dad).

    Liked by 6 people

  15. Chas, grief often comes in waves. One moment it will feel normal, and the next moment it may feel completely otherwise. That is OK if it happens to you.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Kathaleena, I am not limiting how God can speak to us. But I believe in Sola scriptura, which means that God Himself has chosen how to communicate with us. His Word is “sufficient,” not lacking, and that is how he communicates with us. And in Scripture, God’s words to the prophets were never called “prayer.” Prayer is us talking to God; when He talks to us, that is not the word for it.

    What I don’t understand in the “God still speaks to individuals today” argument is this: In the days when the Bible was being written, it was understood that a word from the Lord was rare. God was advancing His communication to human beings over time. The words He gave to people were then written down, because they were understood to have a larger purpose than just one individual. Then we came to the “fullness of time,” the fulfillment of all prophecy in Jesus Christ. Within the lifetime of His apostles, God brought the canon to a close and we had it complete, and now in one Book in our own hands. Multiple generations of believers would be in awe to have what we have, the complete Word of the Lord in a form we can hold and read. So why is this generation, the one with the complete written Word of God, the one that also wants and even expects something “more” from God?

    Liked by 1 person

  17. On Janice’s question yesterday about contemplative prayer, yes, I am quite familiar with it – have even endured a few congregational sessions of it and found it extremely aggravating. I view prayer as a way of communicating with God, but I find nothing communicative in the structure of contemplative prayer. It seems utterly pointless to me. I have always struggled to keep focused on long-winded prayers, so the contemplative structure, which involves focus on single aspects with long periods of silence never fails to set my attention wandering. I remain focused so long as I am praying actively, not passively listening. Jesus, in his prayers, used them for active communication and his model prayer, which can be expanded on as needed portrays prayer as active communication. I believe in the Spirit’s leading, and have often experienced it, in little as well as great things – a God who sees the sparrow fall and numbers the hairs of our heads is not going to be offended by requests for wisdom in small things. But contemplative prayer is empty and meaningless, rather reminding me of Jesus’ call to brevity when teaching on prayer in Matthew 6.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Cheryl, faith is not static, it constantly grows. I would say that the Spirits leading involves practical application from the revealed words of God. Occasionally, I have experience a direct word’

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Hit post accidentally: Occasionally, I have experienced a ‘direct word’ and it is always Scripture, but Scripture that applies to the situation I am facing – I have no hand in bringing the Scripture to mind, since the only time I hear it is just in the borderland between sleeping and waking, but I recognize the presence of the Scripture in my mind as fundamentally different than most waking thoughts, because of the absolute clarity with which it comes and how it stays with me when I fully awake. Usually, though, the leading I experience is just a strong urge, no words involved, just a clear and definite feeling to so something and do it now. I make no presumptions on it – the things I feel an urge to do are in no way sinful or unwise – and I never justify my actions to others on the basis of feeling such an urge. When the leading does come in form of a Scripture, I wait to see how it will be fulfilled and do not run ahead – it can take years for such a Scriptural promise to be fully fulfilled. I do not claim special revelation, rather the merciful leading and protection for a child of God who lives in utter dependence on Him. The leading is for myself alone, not a message to impart to others.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Interesting to hear viewpoints on contemplative prayer. I found the article interesting because I know someone who really appreciates the books by Richard Foster. This is helping me better understand something that has puzzled me about that person.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Janice, the person who lead the contemplative prayer sessions I sat through is in many ways a good, decent person. But I once heard this person admit to not having read the Old Testament through, and I couldn’t help thinking that level of Biblical illiteracy explained the reason this person sought experiential sessions through different modes of prayer. One’s understanding of God is limited if one only knows the New Testament, and thus the person’s seeking for further knowledge of God through prayer. I also think a lack of teaching on the work of the Holy Spirit could lead to seeking such experiential prayer techniques – if one doesn’t understand that it is the Spirit who leads us into all truth, one might think it is our responsibility to seek the truth through meditative prayer techniques.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Roscuro, I definitely believe the Spirit can bring Scripture to mind and convict us of sin. What I get troubled by is people believing that God speaks to them in either the minutia of life (e.g., what checkout line to stand in–yes, I’ve heard people saying God tells them such details) or in decision making in details that go beyond Scripture–for instance, that God told them to marry a particular person. (At my Bible college, it was a common conversation among the women that certain men would go around to women saying God told him to ask her out or marry her, and basically he’d keep going until he’d found a new Christian who hadn’t heard that line before and wasn’t willing to disobey God, even God as speaking through a false prophet.)

    Now, when God told Hosea to marry a promiscuous woman, that was an actual command and not a suggestion. If God tells me to marry someone today, would it be disobedience–sin–if I choose not to do so? I actually have a friend who has had a very hard marriage, and in one of the first conversations I had with her and her husband, he explained to me that he didn’t know why he married her, but he just knew God had told him to marry her, and so he did. She was a fairly new believer and well into adulthood at the time they married, and they hadn’t been married long when I met them. She probably figured this old man had been a believer much longer than she had, and he could hear from God well enough that she should obey. How much better it would have been for both of them if they had done the work to determine whether it was a good match!

    God’s actual Word, and what He tells us about decision making, so easily gets set aside for something “better,” when we want to hear something new from God that He hasn’t said in His Word.

    Like

  23. roscuro, correct 🙂

    Sweet people and some take their Bibles very seriously (and so are more orthodox than others). There is a branch of evangelical Quakers here in the west whose churches (I belonged to one for several years) are, mostly, indistinguishable from many independent evangelical churches.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I need to start figuring out how my taxes will get done this year, whether they want me to come in as usual; I guess I at least will need to drop off things (some of which I still need to find online I believe).

    It seems like forever when I went in last year, right when this pandemic was just getting started.

    What a very long year it has been.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. As a young adult I visited a large evangelical Friends church in Orange County CA with my friend who had grown up in that church. I don’t remember the name of it, Rose something, I think. I admit that I had not been a Christian for many years, and may have missed some subtle things, but the service seemed to me not much different from other evangelical churches I went to.

    My friend’s views were quite orthodox. He did say that the church didn’t practice communion or baptism.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I decided I’d check out MeWe, and have contact requests in to Nancy Jill and Janice. I figure once I’m linked to them I’ll be able to find Peter too. I don’t expect to leave FB any time soon since that’s where most people are, but I’m willing to spend a little time getting acquainted with the alternative and maybe giving it a push.

    Come to think of it, I had a MySpace account that I haven’t looked at in many years. I wonder if it’s still there?

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Cheryl, well, I had one of those strong impulses to go out and get on a bus once – while on that bus, I received encouragement, encouragement that has stayed with me to this day, from a fellow Christian whom I had never seen before and never gave seen since. As I said, a God who counts the number of hairs on our heads (Luke 12:6-7) is not offended by us praying about the minutiae of our lives. If giving a glass of water is blessed (Matthew 10:42), then our smallest action is not insignificant to the kingdom. Perhaps someone in one of those grocery lines is waiting to hear the gospel. One shouldn’t be paralyzed by fear that if one chooses this mundane thing, rather than that mundane thing, one’s world will collapse – had I not caught that bus, no doubt the Lord could still have gotten the encouragement to me by other means – but we shouldn’t make the mistake of thinking that the mundane is too trivial for God either.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Kevin, I would say both baptism and communion are vital elements of obedience in the Christian life. Jesus didn’t give many commands of specific actions that believers needed to do. Baptism and communion are the only two physical steps he said specifically to take. The only two prescribed rituals, or sacraments, that every orthodox church takes. Yes, they are two of the most disputed, with most denominations having been formed around disagreements over those two things (since every orthodox denomination agrees with the foundational doctrines found in the Apostles and Nicene creeds), but that only serves to underscore their importance. Quaker’s rejection of those practices shows a lack of belief in the reliable authority of Scripture, hence the reason for their seeking of experiential learning if God and why those who are Quakers range, as the link I shared notes, from agnostics to believers in the Trinity.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Roscuro, I’ve had those strong impulses, too. God does use everything for good. Do unbelievers never have strong impulses? Do strong impulses never result in the death of the person who had a strong impulse, or a bad decision made by such person? Would you have been sinning not to get on that bus?

    I’m not opposed to intuition or hunches or even a sense that I “should” do this. I’m simply saying that the Protestant doctrine of Sola scriptura says God’s Word is enough and we don’t need a private word from God–and that those who are looking for a private word from God, in general the more earnestly they seek it, the less earnestly they seek wisdom that God has actually given, within His Word (and in God-ordained means such as talking to other people).

    When God told Hosea to marry Gomer, it would have been a sin for him not to do so. And it would have been a sin for anyone to talk him out of it. Likewise today, the person who believes God has spoken in a means other than His Word is likely to make firm, unyielding decisions–decisions not open to someone else’s wisdom or the wisdom from Scripture. In the worst cases, people write new material that they believe to be Scripture or at least important new revelation (The Book of Mormon, Jesus Calling). But harm can also be done in lesser cases, such as someone marrying without due diligence or someone making a decision because “God told me to do this” and then getting mad at God when the decision turns out badly.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Kevin (1:07), yes, there are a couple large Friends churches in OC; the one in Yorba Linda (not sure if that’s still OC, but I think it is) I believe was the one pastored by a former pitcher on the LA Dodgers.

    Communion and baptism were debated in many of those more conservative churches (and in some cases practiced, but as part of an evening service usually at someone’s home or on some retreats).

    But it was among the reasons I left — after I’d also begun reading Reformed literature (another member of the Friends church I belonged to at the time was doing the same and gave me the tip about a free Reformed gathering for lecture and discussion that met every Friday night nearby; a youthful Michael Horton was among the regular speakers as were other “new” Reformed authors many of us have probably read in later years — this would have been in the early/mid 1990s).

    Like

  31. Why I looked up the article on contemplative prayer: I had posted a photo on Facebook with a verse of scripture I had memorized this week at the top, Psalm16:1, “Preserve me. O God, for in You I put my trust.” I memorized that verse because I can get pretty stressed out during tax season. I posted that the verse could be used for breath prayer because of its short length. I have used breath prayer occasionally in the past when I felt anxious. It was a way to be in the moment with my mind on God when the what ifs of life were bothering me. I did not use scripture for it in the past. I would simply inhale and think, “I love,” and then exhale and think, “You, God.” I could have been singing Jesus Loves Me as an alternative. A fellow believer saw my post and warned I needed to be very careful with contemplative prayer and told me to look at the Berean Research on it. I really did not know it was a “thing.” I had heard of listening prayer before since some years back I read and reviewed a book on that subject. So I am learning new things about contemplative prayer today. And it is helping me better understand how someone I know prays and why she has commented about another person praying in the Holy Spirit.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. I now have 6 friends on MeWe….you found me! 🙂
    I cannot hit like here unless I log in every time and sometimes Word wants me to log in on a different email…and when I do my “likes” go away…weird
    Watching the news about that plane engine that went falling from the sky in Denver…can you imagine?!? Thankfully no one was injured but wow..the big ‘ol ring casing ended up at someone’s front door!

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Besides the friends I reached out to on MeWe, another friend found me within minutes of my joining. She said she got a notification that I joined. How did it know that we know each other and it should tell her I joined?

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Chas – Your granddaughter’s description of how Elvera was as a grandmother sounded a lot like my own mom. Mom has been gone for ten and a half years now, but her granddaughters still fondly reminisce about the fun times they had with her (and my dad).

    Nightingale inherited Mom’s Butterfly Gold Corelle dinnerware. She actually dislikes the look of the pattern and the color, but she loves and uses the dishes because “they were Gramma’s”. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  35. Janice I have had to look up some of those “forms” of prayer. I had never realized there was a distinction in “how” we speak and listen with our Lord. These scriptures came to mind as I pondered the points: Psalm 4:4, Psalm 46:10, 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18
    I then searched the question of contemplative prayer and this came up as an answer from Focus on the Family:
    It was not in the wind, the earthquake, or the fire that the Lord spoke to Elijah. It was in the “still, small voice” of intimate, personal communion (1 Kings 19:12). David highlights the value of this type of spiritual discipline in Psalm 4:4, where he writes, “Meditate within your heart on your bed, and be still.” Another Psalmist similarly represents the Lord as exhorting His people to “be still and know that I am God” (Psalm 46:10). And Jesus Himself, who lived and breathed the Old Testament Scriptures, often retired to quiet, secluded spots in the wilderness or on the mountain where He could converse with His Father. He obviously believed it was important to get away from the noise and distraction of the crowd (see Mark 1:35). In time, His disciples learned to follow His example.
    I know my relationship with our Saviour…it is personal and intimate. He has given me leading when I have asked for His direction. And yes I would even say He has spoken to me 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  36. Janice, we can learn a lot from each other. But it all has to go back to the Word. Thanks for bringing up the contemplative prayer thing. I did not know it was a thing either though, in retrospect, I have heard of it in action.

    Liked by 3 people

  37. Cheryl, you know, I wasn’t asking for a ‘private’ word from God when I got that impulse. I was asking for comfort and guidance, both perfectly Biblical requests – one could just pray the Psalms in asking for those two things. I wasn’t expecting God to give me that impulse, I wasn’t expecting a ‘sign’. I was simply mightily discouraged and overwhelmed at the time and seeking to encourage myself in the Lord. Asking if not responding to an impulse is sin (never said it was), unbelievers get impulses (first, we need to more clearly define impulses) or if people are ever hurt or killed by strong impulses (see above point about definitions) are all the wrong questions. Sometimes, as Jesus pointed out to Peter when Peter asked about John’s future after Jesus had told Peter’s future, experiences are for the individual alone, which is why I never regard such personal impulses as messages to be conveyed to others. But, I do know enough Scripture to be able to say that a) the Spirit does communicate to us via our spirits (Isaiah 30:21, Romans 8:16); and b) not every impulse is to be obeyed but rather one’s understanding must be involved in choosing whether to obey an impulse (I Corinthians 14:32). That last passage in I Corinthians is interesting, because Paul could have told the church that their speaking in tongues was superstitious nonsense and to quit it – he laid down the law without sparing on other occasions – but he doesn’t. He knows that like Jesus told Peter, individual experiences vary, and so while he tells those experiencing such phenomena to bring in their understanding and not simply give way to impulse, he also doesn’t venture a blanket judgement. Now, had I been writing to the Corinthians, I would have been inclined to tell them that their tongues were not the same as those at Pentecost, etc., as I tend to be more of a cessationist bent. But Paul refrains from drawing such a clear line. One of my believing aunts once developed, without seeking it, the ability to speak in tongues, but as no one could interpret, she prayed that it would be taken away from her, as she did not like not being able to understand what she was saying, and it was. Not everything has a clear answer in Scripture.

    Liked by 2 people

  38. Thank you, Nancyjill. That is helpful. This morning I was fretful about my younger years wasted with my lack of faith in Jesus. It was as if I heard an internal voice saying kindly, without accusation, that the years had been redeemed through childbirth. I had lived selfishly before, but after childbirth, I basically sacrificed my previous life to take care of our son, Art, and my mother. I was not in anyway looking to mitigate my contrite feelings, but it sure was good to feel “no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.”

    Like

  39. Roscuro, I know, and I wasn’t trying to put words in your mouth, just pointing out that God’s using a “sense” of us wanting to do something isn’t the same thing as an extrabiblical word from the Lord.

    Like

  40. Morning all. Time to get ready for school. It is strange to be on such a different time zone than you all.
    Yesterday was filled with prayers for those attempting to return. some made it some did not. they will arrive here late tomorrow as they are in route now.

    Liked by 2 people

  41. Janice, I often look back and think what a waste my whole life has been, but I know that is not right thinking. God has worked in my life since He started me in the womb and that time has not been wasted. Yes, I could have used my life differently, but this is what it is. How am I going forward? It is easy to see how I could have done better in so many ways, but it is also not mine to call.

    Liked by 3 people

  42. While I know about critical race theory, it isn’t such a central point in Canadian academia. Rather, it is the concept of post-colonialism, which holds that societies founded by colonisation are inherently discriminatory against indigenous peoples and the discriminatory institutions need to be deconstructed. My final class of my degree program, we had to do a group project, in which each team was to prepare a class-length presentation for the rest of the class. My team for the topic of indigenous health, which I was happy for as I had just returned from Nunavut. But the assignment asked us to use a post-colonial theoretical framework in constructing the presentation. Well, I found one which proved extremely useful, developed by the Miq’ma of Nova Scotia. It was called Two Eyed Seeing, and called for the use of both the traditional Western scientific perspective as well as traditional First Nations knowledge. You see, I knew from both my time in West Africa as well as in the far North, that traditional knowledge had a lot to teach Western science, if we only take the time to listen. Traditional ways often contain valuable clues to remedies for problems unique to them, just as scientists using traditional European knowledge led to medical advances, such as the development from the traditional herb foxglove (digitalis) used to treat heart ailments to the medication Digoxin used to treat heart failure. Only a misplaced pride would make the assumption that other traditional societies wouldn’t have similar valuable information to add to science. My group’s presentation did rather well. Instead of viewing the requirement for a post-colonial framework as another imposition of liberal thought on learning, I found something positive and constructive to enhance everyone’s learning.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.