76 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 1-29-21

  1. Morning! It is going to get up to 50 degrees here today….yippee!! I just might open up the windows a tad bit and bring in some of that fresh mountain air!

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  2. Good morning, Chas. I saw Jo posted on the end of yesterday’s thread. I pray she gets a good night’s sleep. And I saw on Facebook that Covid is making Kim sleep a lot so I pray it remains a mild case for her and that Mr P can have a great result from his treatments.

    I have been reading some of the poems by St. Francis of Assisi. Some align with my Christian beliefs and others, sadly, do not. It makes for interesting reading since I know enough scripture now to read with discernment. Earlier in life I would not have known the difference.

    When I was young and taking a French class, we had to do a project of our own choosing. I flipped through our set of secondhand encyclopedias, brand which no one had heard of, and I found a picture of St. Francis of Assisi. I thought with a name like that he must be from France, lol. I had no one to help me with such things and keep me on the right path intellectually. I had been given a woodburning set. I decided to use a piece of plywood and freehand draw an enlargement of the photo in the encyclopedia. I did a good job on the likeness and then also on the woodburning. I proudly took my project into class. My teacher said I did not do that. I felt so badly but defended that I did. He then accepted that I had done it. He never questioned about it being St. Francis or anything about his association with France which could have been a learning lesson. Now in this book of poetry there is a write up with an interesting tidbit about how he would at times pretend to play the violin and sing the songs his mother had taught him in French. Fun!

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  3. Mr P has “cabin fever”. He wants out of the hospital.
    M is bringing me homemade soup later today. It’s nice that she has the code to the garage door and can put it in the outside refrigerator then leave and I can go get it.
    I have to figure out getting the dogs some food before they get spoiled with leftover chicken and rice.

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  4. I have been doing nothing all morning but sitting in a chair beside Elvera.
    She is in terrible shape, but there is nothing to do. Mostly in her mind, but she has a bad leg now.

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  5. I am so sorry to hear of Elvera’s health situation, Chas. At the same time I am so thankful she is there with you in a comfortable home with warmth and love in the room. She is not in a hospital in isolation with only strangers caring for her in a place without any semblance of home. It makes such a difference that you are an overseer of her even if others do the physical labor of her care at this point. May you be given the peace and joy of reflection on the eternal days (time beyond time as we know it) ahead when we all have our new bodies and minds unaffected by the diseases in this world.

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  6. Nancyjill, it’s all the way down to 50 for our high temps these days. All a matter of perspective.

    We had quite a bit of rain yesterday and through the night. My power went out briefly, but right when I was watching a Kevin Costner movie about a single dad & writer who buys a gorgeous old two-story home in South Carolina — right next to an Indian burial mound, of course.

    Power went out right at a very scary point and I jumped.

    It’s raining lightly through this morning, according to the forecast, and then that should be it; but I see there are evacuations in several places today, including Orange County so we probably have some mudslides in the works.

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  7. Interesting what Challies’ take is, however, from Cheryl’s link:

    ~ … she (a friend counseling him) wanted me to rage against God. Paraphrasing one of her favorite authors she said “It’s okay to be angry with God about this. It’s okay to tell him exactly how you feel about him right now. Let him have it. He doesn’t mind.”

    My instincts rebelled against her counsel, but for just a moment I wondered. I didn’t feel anger in my loss, but should I? I didn’t resent God’s sovereignty in taking my son, but might that be appropriate? Already I was leaning hard on God for comfort, but should I now also press against him for blame? In that very moment a verse of scripture, a mere fragment, flashed into my mind. “Curse God and die.” In this case it was not a human demanding it of another as Job’s wife did of her husband. Rather, it was the Holy Spirit’s reminder of what it would mean for me to raise my fist to the sky.

    That moment was a test of my faith. Haven’t we all wondered whether our faith would be able to withstand a staggering blow like the sudden, unexplained death of a child? I certainly had. In that moment I had to choose whether my faith would push me toward God or away from him. I had to make a choice between submission and rebellion. …

    … That moment was a test, I’m sure of it. For though there is a thread of teaching in the Christian world that says it is a sign of maturity and authenticity to be angry with God, I am unconvinced. In fact, I’m sure the opposite is true—that there would never be an appropriate time for me to be angry with God or at God. Why? Because, ultimately, to be angry at what God does is to be angry at who God is. To be angry with his actions is to be angry with his person. It’s to doubt that his actions were just, that they were wise, that they were right, that they were good. It’s to cast aspersions on his very character.

    That’s not to say we can never be angry. It’s not to say we must be completely impassive in the face of grief, sorrow, and suffering. …

    … Job knew that consolation does not come by raging against God, but by submitting to him. …

    … Comfort comes when we align our will with the will of God. Peace flows when we bless him in our grief as we did in our joys. For his love is as constant, his character is as perfect, his actions are as irreproachable in the taking as they were in the giving. ~

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  8. Oy, what a morning. I forgot to set my alarm, so I woke up at 7:05. I usually leave by 6:45 after getting ready for the day. So, quick get ready and dressed. Glass of orange juice and a banana and out the door. I called my principal to say I’d be late, and got here just before the first bell.

    Anyway, here are your funnies.

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  9. Sending some virtual coffee to Peter in case he needs it today. Coincidental that Art overslept today, too, and he never does that. I hope it is not a sign of the sleeping illness, encephalitis, or the dreaded C word.

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  10. Anger at God is not the unforgivable sin. It can be acknowledged and repented of and forgiven. Job’s wife was basically saying curse God and go to hell. It is preferred to be angry at the circumstances God allows and recognize that He does not leave us alone and without His comfort through them. That is the better way, but He shows compassionate to us in His understanding the many emotions we have that can make us feel out of control and drive us to give in to bad choices.

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  11. “In that moment I had to choose whether my faith would push me toward God or away from him. I had to make a choice between submission and rebellion. . .”

    That’s exactly how I felt when Hubby died, that I had to choose faith over bitterness (with the help and comfort of the Holy Spirit, obviously). The verse that kept coming to mind was when Peter asked Jesus, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.” (John 6:68, NKJV)

    And yes, I have had to remind myself of that a time or two (or more) since then, when the missing Hubby feels especially acute, and I wonder why he had to die so “young”.

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  12. I appreciate Challies’ thought, which are very personal to him at a time of deep grief. However, I do not think Job is the only example in Scripture of how to interact with God during times of deep pain and sorrow. Several of the Psalms give bitter cries that question where God is and what he is doing. Then there is Jeremiah. He at one point tried to give up his commission of prophecy, he was in such grief and anger, but found he could not. Habbakuk’s song of protest is another example of human frustration being displayed in interaction with God. In fact, I am not sure that Job didn’t display anger himself. His words that it would have been better for him not to have been born at all sound quite angry. He never cursed God, but he certainly got exasperated with God’s actions a few times.

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  13. Wow, Peter, I was tired just reading about your morning. It’s been a long time since I’ve had to start work “early” and go anywhere on top of it, though I’ve had my share through the years. And mornings are always hard for me. I guess my longest commute as when I had a job at a publishing company in Hollywood and had to be there at 8 a.m. (the drive took maybe 40-45 mins, but it was also rush hour so I only got it that short by dashing up and around and down and across side streets that I already knew about0.

    We also had a very strict top boss, Vern, a stern middle-aged woman who liked to stand at the doors of the elevator with her clipboard as workers were dashing in just in time or maybe a minute late. We were terrified of her.

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  14. I truly have never understood being angry with God. My Mom has said she was so mad at God when her Mother died. My Mom was 15years old and had taken great care of her Mom, helping the doctor tap her Mom’s legs draining fluid. She said she would look up at the sky and scream, shaking her fist in anger. A sad thing to picture for me.
    Two ladies in my former book club shared their anger towards God…”how dare He call Himself Father” were their statements. They shared they had trauma associated with their earthly Fathers. I wept at their statements of anger toward such a “friend to me”…it broke my heart…

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  15. I’ve always thought Job no doubt went “through” a process in which anger, along with other emotions, whether actually directed at God or not (consciously) were experienced and expressed.

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  16. Being angry with God: sure we can, but what is the point? As mentioned, many of the psalms are expressions of anger. But really, if God is Sovereign and providing our best, what is the point of being angry at Him when He does exactly that? We can certainly have a moment when we think we could have done it better, but after confessing that sin, we move on to accepting His gift.

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  17. I guess a different way of wording the question could be: Is it a sin to be angry at God?

    When I have heard people say it is OK to be angry at God, almost invariably I have heard irrelevant arguments like “It’s OK to be angry at God, because God can take it.” Well, my husband can probably “take” my anger, too, but clearly that isn’t the right question. Is it right to be angry at my husband, and will it help anything to be angry at my husband? Under some circumstances, yes, it might be righteous to be angry at one’s husband. But that’s a whole different question than whether or not he can take it. So the question comes back to God: Is anger at God ever not a sin? Or is there always sin involved when one is angry at God? (And is it ever helpful to be angry at God? If so, how?)

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  18. Michelle – I still tell God that I wonder why Hubby had to die when he did, but I wonder it in a manner that does not expect an answer, nor think that God owes me one.

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  19. I got mad at my earthly father. He knew. I knew. We both got over it. Our children get mad at us. We still love them. We get mad at our children. They still love us. I don’t see it any differently. He understands our anger and grief. When we have spent ourselves He will be there to wrap us in His arms and give us assurance.

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  20. It should be remembered that for the Christian, God is our Father, and we are his children. The Psalms express the whole range of emotions of a believer, not just the ones that are perfectly mature, and the Psalms are part of the inspired word of God, showing that God both understands and expects that his children will experience all emotions in their walk with him. As one Psalm says, “he knows our frame, he remembers we are only dust.” Emotions rise up within us at the blink of an eye, and while we may never show outwardly what we feel if we are well trained in self control, God already sees and knows us all the way through our being. If there was a ripple of momentary exasperation at God’s will as we encounter yet another obstacle, yet another crisis, yet another heartache, he has already seen it. To try to condemn and excise those initial emotional responses does no good, they are known about even before we are consciously aware of their presence. We are saved by the blood of Christ, not by our own self control. To attempt to quell all possible unrighteous emotions is more than we are capable of. Only maturity, that comes from our faith being tested and tried repeatedly, will make our responses what they should be. Attempting it in our own strength is doomed. As another of the Biblical poets, the Preacher, said, “Be not overly righteous, why should you destroy yourself?”

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  21. Roscuro, in the post by Challies, someone suggested that he should intentionally express anger at God. I don’t think anyone will say we always have the right heart attitude toward God or toward one another. But neither should we encourage anger against God as a positive, helpful thing.

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  22. How can I rale against God when I am so very dependant upon Him and His mercy? I have to understand that things happen, not because God is.picking on me, but most times as a result of my own actions. Sometimes things just happen. You just have to put your head down and keep plowing forward.

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  23. Tabletalk theme this month is on Providence:

    ~ We must recognize that everything that happens in all of creation is in some way the result of God’s providence, and we must also recognize our triune God’s providential governance of all His creatures and all creation does not make Him the author or approver of sin. There is glorious mystery in this, yet it is what God has revealed about Himself. Instead of causing us to blame God, it makes us cast ourselves wholly upon Him as we live before His face, coral Den, now and forever, all for His glory and His glory alone. ~

    — “In the Providence of God,” the opening article

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  24. Nothing in Scripture indicates that those who get temporarily angry with God are less worthy or even less trusting of God than those who do not. Moses got angry that God had placed him in charge of such difficult people, yet he was called the meekest man. Elijah was the greatest Old Testament prophet, but he got angry with God after a threat to his life and God was very patient and kind with him over that anger, giving him sleep, food, and solitude before finally gently correcting him. Jonah got angry with God over the most trivial of things, a plant dying, and also over the fact that God spared the Ninevites, but he was still a prophet and became a sign of the burial and resurrection of Christ. It states in Hebrews that the world was not worthy of the prophets. Their continuing to remain faithful in the midst of such discouragement and trial was considered exceptional by God, even though they did not always respond correctly initially.

    It reminds me of the parable Jesus told of the two sons who were asked by the father to go and work in his vineyard. The first said he wouldn’t go, but then later relented and went. The second said he would go, but never did. As the Lord pointed out, it was the first who did his Father’s will. Now, I understood that first son, because that was often me growing up. A request from my parents to do something was always jarring, because I tend to get absorbed in whatever I am doing in the moment. Quite often I felt angry and irritated at the interruption. I would eventually do the task, but I had to take a little time to readjust to doing it – incidentally, my father is also very much this way, and can be quite crusty initially when he is interrupted in something by a request. Yet eventually I would do it, because I couldn’t flat out defy my parents, they were too important to me to treat them that way. Now, a certain homeschooling program taught that delayed obedience was disobedience and disobedience was portrayed as rebellion, so I was made to feel very guilty for that initial response, until I realized that was not what the Bible teaches. That is how I see a Christian who occasionally experiences anger toward God. They balk initially at what God has handed them to do or to endure, but they will go through it anyway, because God is far too important for them to actually defy his will.

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  25. Michelle, “Why?” is constantly asked in Scripture of God. Rebekah asked why her children struggled inside her. When Pharaoh increased his oppression of the Israelites after Moses interfered, Moses asked God why he had been sent. Gideon questioned why God had let the Midianites oppress Israel. Job asked why and so do the Psalms.

    It has often been said that God is a relational God, that he seeks a relationship with his Creation. He became human to have a relationship with us. Jesus suffered on earth as a human, to the point of begging that the cup might pass from his hands, to the point of crying out in utter lonliness, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me!” (The first line of Psalm 22) Yet humans always seem to think that the more we strip ourselves of those traits of our humanity, like emotion, the closer to God we will get.

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  26. Good morning, Jo. What is on the docket for today? I am just in from inspecting the spring cleanup husband and children have been doing. They are doing excellent work and saving me a lot of it which is even more excellent!

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  27. Roscuro – I think it is a matter of degree, and what we do with that anger towards God. Even if anger is a natural response at times, that doesn’t give us the right to linger in it. (Not saying that you said that it is.) And when we catch ourselves, we need to ask forgiveness, which will reconcile us to our Father in Heaven, and He will comfort us.

    And yes, to be completely honest (not that any of my previous comments were dishonest), there have been moments when I felt angry or frustrated with God about Hubby’s death. But I quickly ask forgiveness, knowing full well – even though it is hard to understand why – that this is all part of God’s will, and that He loves me (and Hubby), and means it all for good, although I may never fully understand how this is working for good. But I believe in my heart that it must be, because His word says so.

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  28. Finished my story for today, waiting for the edit … It was sunny for a little while this morning but is cloudy again, raining off and on, but the storm as mostly passed.

    Heard from a friend at church, she and her husband and their (young adult) kids all were down with covid, no fun from the sounds of it, sick for about 3 weeks, she said the men fared better than the women.

    Very strange illness, she told me.

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  29. Kizzie, in the case of both Elijah and Jonah, God came to them before they came to him. He reconciles us before we reconcile with him. What bothers me most about what is being said about anger in all this discussion is how much reliance is being placed on human strength to maintain a right relationship with God. We cannot in our own strength, so that.

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  30. In our weakness we cry out to God, “I can not do this. I need Your help.” That is the point of submission and humility that welcomes Him to be our strength in weakness. Pride keeps anger around for too long fooling us into thinking we have control.

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  31. Somebody is going to hurt God’s feelings. Fortunately, he doesn’t carry a grudge:
    “All things work together for good ………………”
    Not that all things are good. But with 90 years experience, I can tell you that, in my case, it all worked out well.
    Now? I’m worried about Elvera. I have done nothing all day but sit beside her trying to keep everything stable. She is in bed now. I hope she can remain without disturbance.
    She has lost capability for almost everything but he ability to holler “Charlie”. I may not be important to anyone else in the world, but I hope I can last until she is gone. Then I am free to go.

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  32. It is Saturday here and I am putting away many of the things I got out. A pile to give away, a pile to burn and a small pile to pack and save. I bleached the bathroom the other day and it is looking so much better. The gal did a good job cleaning it, but I think that she ran out of bleach. Have to have old, white clothes to bleach in.

    I actually weighed myself yesterday and I had made the goal that I set last March. Amazing.

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  33. Oh, the sweetness, Chas, to hear her call for you. It may be disturbing, but if that is her last ability, it is wonderful.
    We need you too, you know.

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  34. From today’s Utmost Response:

    The January 29 reading provides plenty to think about.

    “Has the voice of God come to you directly? If it has, you cannot mistake the intimate insistence with which it has spoken to you. God speaks in the language you know best— not through your ears, but through your circumstances.”

    Our circumstances tend to catch our attention better than God’s voice–even for those who seek to hear God’s voice.

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  35. “There are many things for which we do not know the reason, but for everything we know who has ordained them. Obadiah Sedgwick wrote, ‘No one is so fit to govern the world as He who made it.’ His perfect wisdom, holiness, justice, power, love and goodness will not fail.

    “Consequently, we can be like the child on board a ship who remained peaceful while wind and waves raged around him. When asked how he kept calm in such a violent storm, he replied, ‘My father is the captain.’ How much more can the church singe: ‘God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the sea’ (Ps 46-1-2)

    ~~ Joel Beeke, “God’s Providence Applied in our Lives” — Feb. 2021 Tabletalk

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  36. Roscuro, I don’t think it is necessary to be relying on human strength to say, “This action/thought is sin.” When I lived in the inner city and saw most girls in my neighborhood get pregnant at least once in their teens, I knew it would take superhuman strength for a young woman to choose chastity in that setting, and I felt great sympathy for the girls growing up in without healthy, unselfish fatherly love. But the difficulty of the task didn’t mean that giving in to sexual sin would not be sinful.

    I think we can acknowledge that even for believers, sin is often our most “natural” response. And yes, we need God’s help to avoid sin, whether the sin is lust or pride or unrighteous anger or something more “active.” But aren’t we also more likely to call something sin “in the moment” when we’ve been able to acknowledge it as sin before we get to that testing time?

    Remember that the person who started this discussion, Tim Challies, did so by encouraging us that even in one of the most difficult human experiences imaginable, the sudden death of one’s only son at a very young age, God can strengthen us and keep us from sin. This discussion isn’t only otherworldly theory; it also includes a testimony of someone who has been face to face with this very question.

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  37. I believe we must ponder the question “what is our view of God”…who is He and what is our relationship with Him? He is awesome and Holy…there is none like Him. He saved me from myself and everything to Him i owe. When I have faced the darkest of days it was to Him I would run. And to me He extended grace and mercy…and the strength to continue on. I cling to Him and trust Him with my very last breath…I fall on my face before Him…He is faithful to forgive…

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  38. Oh my DJ!! That is scary…I hope no one was in harms way when it all came rushing down!
    Continued prayers for you and Elvera Chas…thankful you have each other…and our Lord ♥️

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  39. Roscuro, your 4:22: one of the beauties of Scripture is that it doesn’t gloss over human frailty and sin. We also see God forgiving us, and God being gentle with us. But that doesn’t mean the examples you gave aren’t sin.

    Again, our approach in a discussion can vary depending on who we’re talking to, and the situation. If I’m talking to a recently engaged young woman who has been carelessly spending long hours in private times on her boyfriend’s couch, I am going to warn of the dangers of sexual sin now that she is engaged and in more danger of succumbing, and I’m going to try to keep her from that regret. If I am talking to that same young woman who is crying over giving in to temptation after the fact, what I say and how I say it will be different.

    If someone comes to me and tells me with embarrassment that she recently found herself angry at God, my response is going to be different than if she comes to me and tells me that she is often angry at God, and that I should be too.

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  40. Cheryl, all that would be more convincing if it was backed by Scriptural examples. Personal experience is personal, “the heart knows its own bitterness, and a stranger does not intermeddle in its joy.” Theological statements are only as good as how much Scripture there is to back them up. When I went and looked for what Scripture says on the subject of being angry with God, I found that while God never allowed people to remain angry with him, often questioning them on it, nor was his response what Job’s wife stated would be the result of cursing God. He didn’t kill people for being angry with him. So, I do not think that being angry with God is the same as cursing him. In other words, the anger that Challies’ friend was speaking of was not the cursing that Job’s wife was speaking of.

    That quote from Joel Beeke about the peaceful child on board a stormy ship is a sentimental and unrealistic picture. In real life, a child on board a storm tossed ship would likely to be very disoriented and ill from motion sickness, leaving them screaming and crying and in a pitiable physical and emotional state requiring careful nurture.

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  41. Roscuro – re: “reliance is being placed on human strength to maintain a right relationship with God” – God commands our obedience, even when it comes to how we handle our feelings, including anger at Him or at others. We are not to let the sun go down on our anger, which to me acknowledges that we will feel anger from time to time, but that we should let it go before the day is out.

    So, to me, it seems that turning from anger (or any sin) is something that God commands us, but also gives us the strength to do. It is both up to us to do it and done in the strength and wisdom He gives us. Does that make sense to you?

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  42. Roscuro, yes, God forgives our sin. I never questioned that. But is it ever NOT sin to be angry at God? Is anger at God ever something that we may encourage?

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  43. Kizzie, of course, but, that is not what Challies article says. The very state of getting angry is made equivalent to cursing God. Yet Job was angry, but didn’t curse God.

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  44. We get angry when we perceive a difference between how we think things should be and how they are. Sometimes it’s because someone (including possibly ourselves) did something wrong, and sometimes it’s because there’s a problem with our perception of how things should be. (Often it’s a mix of both.) I don’t think there’s any sin in that initial feeling, whether it’s directed at God or another person (or ourselves). But once we feel it, we have to figure out whether the issue is what someone did that they shouldn’t have (or didn’t do that they should have) or whether the problem is our perception. The sin is when we let the anger fester instead of either dealing with the situation or getting our perception straightened out, depending on which is needed in the situation. If we’re angry at God, the problem is our perception, that we thought we had a right to expect something that we didn’t, and if we go right on thinking we have that right, that’s the sin. If the feeling of anger can get us to stop and think and realize we had been thinking about it wrong, then it has accomplished something positive.
    I think the people who speak positively of being angry at God are probably trying to get people who are already angry at God but don’t want to admit it, even to themselves, to acknowledge it to themselves and to God – who already knows it anyway.

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  45. Kizzie, this is the quote that Tim Challies was reacting to. Personally, I think it is pretty close to “Curse God.”

    “It’s okay to be angry with God about this. It’s okay to tell him exactly how you feel about him right now. Let him have it. He doesn’t mind.”

    Imagine that someone tells me to say that to my husband. Now, if my husband has greatly sinned against me, that might be a good idea. Or even if my husband is making decisions that aren’t necessarily sin, but that are hurting me, it would be good to talk about it. But encouragement to “Let him have it” doesn’t sound like saying, “Can we talk?” or “I’m hurting right now.” And it doesn’t sound like the way to approach a holy and righteous God.

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  46. Cheryl, it would be perfectly reasonable to state to your husband, “I’m feeling very angry with you right now. I do not understand your actions, they make no sense to me. I love you and trust you, but all I feel right now is pain and confusion.” That would be telling him exactly what you feel about him at the moment and letting him have it honestly. Would there be any sin in saying the same thing to God in prayer?

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  47. Being angry IN a circumstance is very different than being angry AT someone. Job was angry in his circumstance but I have never understood him to be angry AT God. He even admonishes his wife when she says to curse God and die. Job even says Tho He slay me I will still trust in Him.
    Being angry with one’s husband seems to pale in comparison to what is being discussed…being angry at God. God is like none other…He is the Almighty…the Creator of all…the Most High…to be revered and worshiped. He owes us nothing…and gave all to us…eternal life through Christ Jesus….

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  48. Cheryl, that is why I looked at Scripture. From God’s responses to the anger, it seems that he is less interested in immediate repentance than he is in long term trust. When David got angry at God for killing Uzzah, an event where David was undoubtedly in the wrong for how he transported the Ark, what does David do? He clearly still reveres the Lord and regards the Ark as holy, leaving it in the house of a Levite to be cared for. But he takes some time away from the situation before going back and doing the right thing. In the meantime, God blesses the Levine’s house and continues to look after David. Elijah walks forty days and nights into the desert before speaking to God at the cave about his anger. When God questions Jonah “Do you well to be angry?” Jonah’s response is immature, petulant even, but God merely says,”If you do well to be angry about the plant, then shouldn’t I care about this great city?” God is demonstrating his patience and love in not replying in anger to human anger. He understands that when gripped by the emotions of anger, humans aren’t quite rational, and gives them space to cool off and come back.

    I don’t think the question of whether it is right to get angry with God is the right question. The Bible doesn’t include a commandment not to get angry at God. It includes a commandment to trust him, but humans are complex emotionally and capable of feeling more than one thing at a time. To go back to an illustration I have used before, on my first ever commercial flight, I found my old fear of heights returned with a vengeance as I sensed the ground dropping away and the plane climbing thousands of feet into the air. The woman next to me tried to calm my sensations of giddiness and faintness by saying she always just trusted that the pilot knew how to fly the plane. My reply was, “I trust the pilot enough to stay on the plane.” That is the way it sometimes is in the Christian life. When the bottom drops out from under your feet, you turn sick and giddy and your emotions swirl, but that doesn’t mean you don’t trust God enough to stay with him. Just as sadness doesn’t mean one cannot rejoice at the same time, so being angry does not mean one cannot still love and trust at the same time.

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  49. To those who believe that God is sovereign in all events and attributes all things to the power of his will, being angry at one’s circumstances is essentially being angry at God. Job clearly recognizes that his circumstances are due to God’s actions. “If only I had someone to hear my case!
    Here is my signature; let the Almighty answer me.
    Let my Opponent compose His indictment.” (31:35)

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  50. No, Roscuro, there wouldn’t. Your wording there is respectful and clear. That’s not how I read, “It’s OK to tell him exactly how you feel about him right now. Let him have it.” Also, “It’s okay to be angry with God about this” is different from “If you are angry at God about this, talk to Him about it. He is your Father.”

    Telling someone “exactly how you feel about him” is a far cry from expressing disappointment.

    If someone came to you and complained about her boss, or a teenager came to you and complained about her father, would you send her back to “tell him exactly how you feel about him right now–let him have it”?

    For the record, my husband and I have talked about this subject multiple times today, and we have discussed a lot of relevant Scripture. I just received a book from an author who is two or three months late in getting her book to me (she had Covid-19 in the fall and then several family emergencies) and so I’m trying to get going on a book that is way behind schedule and haven’t had time to sit down and write out essays. But multiple Scriptures have come to mind, many of them relating to our attitude toward God and in general toward those in authority, and also various things the Bible says about anger. It would be worth studying–but this week I’m behind schedule on a book I was supposed to have finished editing before the end of 2020 and only got this week, so this week I’m doing the “take a short break” approach.

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  51. That should be 13:15). The context of that verse shows it even more clearly:
    “Hold your peace, let me alone, that I may speak, and let come on me what will.
    Wherefore do I take my flesh in my teeth, and put my life in mine hand?
    Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain [argue] mine own ways before him.
    He also shall be my salvation: for an hypocrite shall not come before him.”

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  52. Cheryl, yet that is how I read it. We each read it a different way. Do not mistake blunt casual speech for disrespect. It isn’t always. Formal speech doesn’t always convey respect either – as Proverbs notes, the flatterer uses fair speech to hide ill intent.

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