53 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 11-5-19

  1. I don’t think I ever told you yesterday that the bird was a Nashville warbler; I came on to say so, but got distracted by some other conversation.

    This one is probably known by many of you–a monarch caterpillar.It was crawling along the chain link fence–I got several cute photos as it did–and I figured it was looking for a place to make a chrysalis. Turns out it had simply eaten every last bit of the milkweed plant it was on–its mama laid its egg really late in the season and there wasn’t much left on any of the plants that hadn’t been eaten or destroyed–and it ended up on another milkweed plant. (The plant it’s moving onto in this shot isn’t milkweed, but it’s a plant on the way to the milkweed.) This is a big, nearly mature caterpillar, and it would probably make a chrysalis in a day or two, and then come out as a monarch butterfly ready to fly to Mexico.

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  2. Morning! Pretty photo which I immediately captioned “just barely hangin’ on”!! Sometimes that is just how I feel 😐 but not today…it is a beautiful morning and I have chores to do!

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  3. Janice – I would get another opinion. Veganism is not healthy, unless maybe if there is a very specific medical reason for it. Just recently, I saw an article that says we need animal fat in particular for our brains. (Although that may only have been particularly for growing children. I didn’t read the article.)

    Lots of people swear by going keto these days, which is almost the opposite of veganism.

    Some ignorant people have put their pets on a vegan diet. Not only is that not good for dogs, it actually kills cats because they are carnivores.

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  4. I don’t think there is a one size fits all eating plan. Vegan seems to be very helpful to daughter. It can also be very helpful to getting people on track to eating real foods rather than so much processed. It can be a jolt to the body. Should people be on it for life? I think it would take some work and attention, but not too much, to be healthy. Seventh Day Adventists seem to be fairly healthy with that eating plan. Daniel and his buds did pretty well with it.

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  5. When I saw the pic today I figured God must have been in a very fun mood to come up with this one. 🙂

    Vegan is big in LA and among most younger people I know. Vegan everything. I did a story a couple years ago on how one of the newer LA Animal Commissioners wanted to put all the city’s shelter dogs on vegan diets. Even my own vet, who’s big on holistic and healthy eating, weighed in against that idea.

    Yeah, i’d do some of my own research and get a second opinion on that one — you can perhaps cut back on meat without going full-on vegan.

    I’m off to the eye specialist in a couple hours. It’s very cold again in the house with fog earlier this morning, the harbor fog horns are getting a workout this week.

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  6. I’m back into trying to eat more fish. I don’t like all fish, but there is some that’s good and I’ve been able to find in frozen varieties at Sprouts.

    My favorite, of course, is fish and chips but that doesn’t really count. 🙂

    Have a fun visit Cheryl & Michelle. Who is taller?

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  7. Janice I would go with what works for you…I don’t eat a lot of meat as I love my veggies…and bread. But I put butter on my bread and veggies….I eat eggs prepared by me but not eggs prepared by anyone else. I do like bacon….prepared by someone else…I hate how it stinks up the house and messes up my kitchen!! 😊 🥓

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  8. A very sad and discouraging statistic is that only somewhere between 2 and 5% of people who lose weight will actually keep it off. 😦 Many, if not most, will put it all back on and then some.

    I think of it as stretching a rubber band. We can feel like we are getting the hang of it and do well for a time. But then, like a stretched rubber band being released, we snap back to old desires and habits, especially if the diet was much different from what we were used to.

    What can be helpful is making changes a little at a time over a period of time. Those little changes become part of our everyday habits, and then we can introduce new little changes. I was doing well with that, and had lost about 12 pounds over a couple years, but then gave into my sweet tooth much more than I should after Hubby’s death. (Even so, I have somehow not put back on too much of the lost weight, and I am finally getting around to pulling back on those habits a little at a time.)

    I read of a woman who lost 100 pounds by using that method in her eating and in her exercising. There was another story I heard of a woman who lost weight and gave up smoking by making small changes over the course of 11 years. That may sound like a long time, but it was a permanent change for her.

    Of course, there are some medical conditions that demand immediate change, and I feel bad for those folks. My mom was a diabetic who never did adjust her eating as well as she should have.

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  9. I need more years, Kizzie. 🙂

    Thoughts on this among our local Baptists and others?

    https://religionnews.com/2019/11/04/mohler-prominent-southern-baptist-will-be-nominated-to-lead-denomination/
    _______________________

    News
    Mohler, prominent Southern Baptist, will be nominated to lead denomination
    November 4, 2019

    (RNS) — There are seven more months before the next annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention.

    But the race for SBC president may already be over, following news that R. Albert Mohler Jr. will likely be nominated to run as the denomination’s next president.

    H.B. Charles, pastor of Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church in Jacksonville, Florida, a predominantly African American congregation, announced last week that he planned to nominate Mohler.

    “We need the zeal to mobilize our resources to spread the gospel,” Charles said in making his announcement on Twitter. “We must do so together. I believe @albertmohler is the man to lead us forward in that unity.”

    Mohler, the president of the denomination’s flagship seminary, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, is widely regarded as one of the denomination’s most prominent public intellectuals. He writes widely, has a podcast and appears regularly on TV.

    In a statement about his willingness to serve as SBC president, Mohler said he hopes to “unite Southern Baptists,” a group that has long had political and theological divisions within its fold even as it has seen a declining membership as the nation’s largest Protestant denomination.

    “We are facing a new era in the world and in the United States, and cultural challenges that will test our conviction,” he said. “We must make clear that we stand without reservation for biblical Christianity and Baptist conviction, and we must stand together.”

    But his nomination to succeed the younger J.D. Greear, a megachurch pastor from Durham, North Carolina, now serving a second and final one-year term as president, has puzzled some. …
    __________________________________

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  10. With regard to Trump, the article says this:

    ____________________________

    ~ Mohler, who is 60, has taken a middle path.

    Though not a Never Trumper, Mohler has expressed skepticism about Trump’s moral character as early as 2016. Appearing on CNN shortly after the “Access Hollywood” tape came to light in which Trump is heard bragging about grabbing women’s genitals, Mohler took a sharply critical view.

    “When it comes to Donald Trump, evangelicals are going to have to ask a huge question: Is it worth destroying our moral credibility to support someone who is beneath the baseline level of human decency for anyone who should deserve our vote?” Mohler said. …

    Mohler has been far more muted on Trump since his election. He is best known in Southern Baptist circles as a leading spokesman for the Reformed or Calvinist wing of the SBC.

    He has also recently been more vocal on racial issues. … ~
    __________________________________-

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  11. On Facebook, I’ve had a few friends keeping their friends up-to-date on their successful dieting. Now none of them are posting about that anymore, and photos show that their success was short-lived. 😦

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  12. Even with my making “little changes”, it will take many years to lose as much as I should. At this point, I don’t expect to ever lose all that I probably need to, but losing some is better than not losing any.

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  13. When talking about Trump and the “baseline for human decency”, what are you talking about?
    Choosing Hillary or any other politician we can name?
    Name someone better.

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  14. I get that Chas (spellcheck wants to change your name to Cats). That statement was made before the election and yes, there were (and still are among many) deep concerns about Trump’s moral character. Character matters, as Republicans were often saying during the Clinton years.

    Something our pastor posted last week on FB:

    So what might a man like John Calvin write to current kings and presidents? In his preface to the Institutes of the Christian Religion, we read the following directed and dedicated to Francis, King of the French—His Sovereign. I would suggest that there is no possible context where this quotation can be misunderstood by the objective reader.

    “The characteristic of a true sovereign is, to acknowledge that, in the administration of his kingdom, he is a minister of God. He who does not make his reign subservient to the divine glory, acts the part not of a king, but a robber. He, moreover, deceives himself who anticipates long prosperity to any kingdom which is not ruled by the sceptre of God, that is, by his divine word. For the heavenly oracle is infallible which has declared, that “where there is no vision the people perish” (Prov. 29:18).”

    Someone then asked him: How do you discern a true “servant of righteousness” from a false one? Or, if a sovereign declares himself a minister of God, how do you know he’s telling the truth?

    His answer: Good question: briefly, life and doctrine.
    _______________________________

    So I know, we’re a long, long way from any of that, have been for some time. And I agree the Dems pose much scarier options, in terms of policies and leadership.

    But still … Trump probably wasn’t the best we could do. He is, however, a product of our culture.

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  15. Are there little things she could do, maybe just changing out the silverware or dish towel drawer? I know that was suggested before. But maybe “make up” little things that “need” doing.

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  16. Chas, the front end of the caterpillar (with longer antennae) has moved onto the leaf.

    Michelle just left–and she took a photo of me in front of that same chain-link fence. She got to talk to one of our resident liberals (capitalism is the problem) on a local trail.

    She took my husband and me out to breakfast at a local restaurant we hadn’t yet visited, though it is very close to our home, and we all had a very nice visit. Then she and I went for a walk, and then she went on her way.

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  17. Art saw on the Doc’s card that said he is top of the line of cardiology at a hospital with the best reputation with heart patients in Atlanta . . . at least they were in the past but with all the mergers of late that may have changed status. He wants Art to lose 50 lbs to prolong his life. We will not be complete vegan, but I will have to really make an effort to do this. I got off track because of my eye situation draining energy and time. Also not being able to run out to the grocery was another hindrance. Now I just need to focus on being a chef. One of the screening tests asked up front was if the patient has experienced anxiety and depression in the last 6 weeks or so. Art answered no. Later in the car he said it was good the question was asked before seeing the doctor and not after getting the diet news. I think we are both in shock and awe. I think this is partly because Art had that double vision that cleared up. It could have been from a blockage in his carotid artery. He had a test for that today. That was what my father died from, a stroke caused by that. I was so thankful they could see Art for that test today. I will be sensible about the diet. We have done it before when I was diligent. We still are not back up to our heaviest weight of the past.

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  18. She helped me arrange the chairs on the deck.
    Consisted mostly of telling me what to do.
    But that is the way it has been for 62 years.
    It works. She is satisfied.
    I am thankful.

    Liked by 8 people

  19. You can do it Janice, it could be a new chef challenge

    They’re super backed up at eye doc, packed waiting room and I have been mistakenly given a Spanish new patient form to fill out (and I’m now upstairs and unable to easily exchange).

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  20. As for SBC elections of leaders, I think the average smaller churches are not too affected by who is in charge. This is the only SBC church I have been a member of and I never hear mention of things on the national level. We have enough things happening here in Atlanta that take all our attention. To me, it seems each church is like a mini-kingdom unto itself. The pastors have a lot of authority in the local church and probably look directly to God as their higher authority rather than looking to the SBC leaders unless their is some unusual situation.

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  21. Vegan or vegetarian? Vegan is no animal products whatsoever, while vegetarian allows for dairy and eggs. Hindu Brahmins have eaten vegetarian diets for hundreds of years. But veganism is detrimental to the body without Vitamin B12 supplements, as the vitamin is only found in animal based products, and the vitamin is essential for the function of every cell in the human body. Modern foods sometimes are B12 fortified, and it is suggested that vegans use those fortified foods or take a supplement, which is ironic, since it means that a vegan diet can never be completely ‘natural’, for all that it is touted as the way to save the planet (stopping animal farming is one way being suggested to slow global warming).

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  22. Back from the eye doctor with some new eye vitamins and orders for more frequent checkups. Age-related stuff is the pits. But nothing to “stress about” for now, says the eye specialist.

    Interesting to hear some of the other patients in our smaller, set-aside waiting room, singing the praises of this particular doctor. They had major complications w/vision loss brought on by diabetes (in 2 cases requiring dialysis). The one man (father of a 2-year-old, he wasn’t very old) had only 50 percent vision in one eye (0% in the other) but kept also talking about how he prays continually in gratitude for the doctors, the machines and everything else we now have medically at our disposal. He goes to a Church of Christ near my first apartment building. Very uplifting group of people.

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  23. Age-related stuff is the pits
    I am blessed is that I have been around long enough for it to take effect.’
    I was in good shape until around 86.
    Now, I need to stay strong to care for her.

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  24. Calvin thought Luther took things too far, as Calvin writes in this letter to Heinrich Bullinger, who fell a victim of Luther’s fire (James 4): https://www.challies.com/articles/how-calvin-responded-when-luther-went-full-out-luther/

    ‘I hear that Luther has at length broken forth in fierce invective, not so much against you as against the whole of us. On the present occasion, I dare scarce venture to ask you to keep silence, because it is neither just that innocent persons should thus be harassed, nor that they should be denied the opportunity of clearing themselves; neither, on the other hand, is it easy to determine whether it would be prudent for them to do so…

    ‘But while he [Luther] is endued with rare and excellent virtues, he labours at the same time under serious faults. Would that he had rather studied to curb this restless, uneasy temperament which is so apt to boil over in every direction. I wish, moreover, that he had always bestowed the fruits of that vehemence of natural temperament upon the enemies of the truth, and that he had not flash his lightning sometimes also upon the servants of the Lord. Would that he had been more observant and careful in the acknowledgement of his own vices. Flatterers have done him much mischief, since he is naturally too prone to be over-indulgent to himself…’

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  25. Not too long ago I saw an article that claims that veganism is actually worse for the environment and climate change than eating meat. I don’t remember why, though. (I may not have read it.)

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  26. Janice – I’m sorry about sharing that bad news about the difficulties in changing diet. Many of us have the luxury to make those slow changes, but some – like Art – are forced into them by health matters. I will pray that the change will go smoothly and be satisfying.

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  27. “Remember Michelle and Cheryl, If there’s no pics, it didn’t happen.”

    I beg to differ. I have met Kim, Jo, RKessler, and Nancy. But there are no pics here because Mrs L would rather i not put my face on this blog. However, I give permission to those who have the pics to send them to AJ, and then anyone who wants to see them can email AJ for a copy.

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  28. The video in the link I posted above is good to watch, both for Lutherans and non Lutherans who want to learn more about that branch of Christianity.

    Luther and Calvin — both brilliant, but good thing neither are considered to be infallible. 🙂

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  29. Chas – I pray that God will keep you as healthy and strong as possible, and that He will grant your request to outlive Elvera.

    As much as losing Hubby hurts, I know that if the situation were reversed, he would probably be doing worse emotionally than I am. So I am “glad” that he was spared that. I just still wish we’d had more time.

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  30. I note that Calvin’s assessment of Luther is much the same as mine was, that Luther’s popularity went to his head. I see that same pattern among a lot of well known church leaders, when they reach a certain point of popularity, where they are too big to fail, it is as if they relax their vigilance against their own fleshly impulses and fail to curb their tongue or other besetting sins.

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  31. Next text from son let me know I can use a garlic press for fresh ginger. That is helpful to know. I had bought a garlic press because at one point he said he’d like one. Then I found out he had already gotten one for himself. So now I have one. Good thing to use for vegan cooking no doubt. If I use enough garlic maybe Art will like squash that makes him gag.

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  32. Yes! I saw that exact fence; it felt almost like I was on a nostalgia tour seeing all these places I’ve heard about for years!

    It was a beautiful day, an excellent visit and a lovely, lovely walk.

    Cheryl and her wonderful husband have organized their home very nicely and, like most of the rest of us, are still trying to get their possessions sorted— but the books are up and look very good!

    I’ll send some photos, including one of photog Cheryl in the wild— you know you want to see that one. 🙂

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  33. It then I returned to day 7.5 of scanning . . ,

    I spent a lot of time simply looking through ministry photos out of China.

    And then I began to cry.

    All those happy faces of Chinese believers holding their Bibles, getting baptized, celebrating their new life in Christ!

    So many of them were persecuted and murdered through the Civil War, the Great Leap Forward and all of Mao’s other horrors— it felt overwhelming, so many people.

    But I don’t dare copy their photos for whatever nefarious means the facial-recognition software China employs might be used to hurt their descendants.

    Horrifying and incredibly sad.

    I’m off to bed now, exhausted.

    Liked by 3 people

  34. I missed the best city wildlife shot tonight. I was walking back to the office after the City Council meeting had ended — about 9 p.m. — when I noticed the cutest raccoon peeking out from a sewer grate next to the curb (on what is a main boulevard filled with gleaming high rises). He was so funny looking. Bummed I missed the shot, but just as I was getting the cell onto the camera app he was gone. 😦

    OK, I’m still at the office but the story is filed. I’m going home now.

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