61 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 4-1-19

  1. I woke up this morning as spry as a 20j year old
    The meanest woman in the world in in the kitchen fixing breakfast.
    I wish Hillary had won the presidency.

    APRIL FOOL1
    Do they still play ricks on April 1?
    When I was a kid, you couldn’t trust anything that was said on April first.
    Usually it was “Shoe’s untied” “April fool! I made you look” But not always.

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  2. Morning, Chas. What a confusing day. Aviation couldn’t figure out our pickup time and one person who was going to come tomorrow tried to back out, but I stood firm. They had made a verbal commitment and needed to honor that. As for our pickup. I had told everyone 6:30 and was not about to change it to 6am, which is too early to begin a holiday, so I decided that I would drive everyone out in the singles van. Then I escaped into a book.

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  3. Good morning! It is 35° in Atlanta with a bit of snow predicted north of here tomorrow morning. The April Fool’s joke in that is it is for real! Gotcha! Where did Spring go?

    I got up at 6 a.m. and made Art’s eggs. I made myself clean out the litter box so I could have the reward of a cup of coffee. Such low pay for such hard labor. Now the garbage truck is taking it all away. All my effort compacted down to more nothingness.

    We finally watched What About Bob? It was great. Thanks again for recommending it. We needed those laughs last night. By the end of tax season we all react like some of those main characters. Cray-Cray! And, once in awhile we do see some clients that have some quirks to rival Bob’s at the beginning of the movie.

    The tree in the photo is our red bud. It was taken a little while back. It is not a tree I intentionally planted. It makes for nice yard decor in spring.

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  4. The national broadcaster has an interview radio program, As It Happens, that used to and may still pull April Fool’s pranks by running a seemingly preposterous story in which they would interview someone who played along (one year it was that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police were selling their entire brand to Disney and they were interviewing an RCMP representative) and then the next night they would play recorded phone calls from outraged listeners concerning the interview, with the last phone call played generally being a listener who picked up on the fact that the interview had been conducted on April 1, so the entertainment value lasted two nights running. My family loved that radio program, as it begins at 6:30, which was suppertime, and goes to 8:00, when we would be washing up, and they do both lighthearted and serious interviews with people from around the world in all walks of life, from war zones to silly annual traditions, like a cheese rolling competition in Gloucester, and annual dramatic readings on Hallowe’en (always the Legend of Sleepy Hollow) and Christmas Eve (two stories, The Shepherd, which is a ghost story in the British tradition of telling ghost stories at Christmas, read by Fireside Al, who was a former announcer for the program, and O’Henry’s The Gift of the Magi). My mother still listens to the program, but we no longer all gather around the table, although I did hear The Shepherd when I was home this past Christmas.

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  5. My grandson and SIL are thrilled to be able to still go skiing while they are here. My daughter is also skiing, but doesn’t care that much one way or another. Most of us are quite happy to move onto spring. It is lightly snowing and we can expect more through out April, I am sure.

    Those spring blossoms are a sight for sore eyes.

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  6. Spring!

    How about an argument about modesty?

    http://www.dennyburk.com/modesty-and-the-legging-problem/

    I thought about how I’d react to young women dressed in tight leggings and midriff shirts in church and really, had only one question: “How do you define the attitude of your heart when you come to church?”

    In my case, the only day of the week I wear a skirt/dress is Sunday–unless something special is going on.

    That helps me remember the Sabbath day is holy and I need to mark it as a different day. It’s a physical manifestation of something in my heart being different–or which should be different when I go to the house of the Lord.

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  7. I’m wearing yoga pants myself right now because for the first time in a month, I’m going to the gym. I thought I would have to put my membership on hiatus for a month to help get the girls to school, but their mom adjusted the baby’s feeding times to take them herself, so I can get to Zumba.

    What a relief! Elly is doing well and the top is open on her isolette. God is good.

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  8. Michelle, I go along with that. Elvera wears pants suits now because she doen’t (as far as I know) have dresses anymore.
    But the only time I wear coat and tie is to church now. I used to work in them.

    But the “worship leader” in the late (standing and clapping) service wears jeans with his shirt tale out. That’s his uniform.
    i can’t get used to that.

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  9. When we were children, my sister and I would always play a joke. Like: “Mom, Frederick is playing in the street”. She would stop what she was doing. (She likely knew we were teasing, but can’t not respond to something like that..) When she went out, we would say, APRIL FOOL. She would act angry, but we knew she wasn’t.

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  10. That is a beautiful sight up there…Spring! We do not see that type of tree out here in the forest but in town there will be that beauty to behold…someday! It is at this time of the year we grow weary of the cold and snow. We were so very blessed to have had a “real” winter this year and for that we are truly grateful.
    Michelle I stood behind a young lady yesterday in church and it would be difficult not to notice her very tight jeans…how could she breathe?! I also noticed her pink tipped hair and her looking around the entire service….with her phone in hand. I am guessing she came with her grandparents. I pray the attitude of her heart is transformed by being in that room where His Word was spoken….may it be that she actually heard as she appeared to be very distracted.

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  11. I still remember the sight of some teen’s thongs when they bent over a few pews ahead of me. Not a pretty sight. They are young and foolish at this age and do not always have someone to remind them.

    The woman in her late 60’s or early 70’s who was wearing leggings with a t-shirt has no excuse. I had to move past her and pulled her t-shirt down from behind. I had seen her bend over earlier and saw a wet spot in a spot she would have been mortified to have seen. We never exchanged a word, but she did look at me as I tugged her shirt down. We haven’t had a chance to discuss it and it was a couple of weeks ago. She is a very nice person, btw.

    I am one who will be thrilled to death when the wearing of leggings is done. I do not mind them under tunics that stay down etc. Otherwise, they simply are ugly and I do not care how thin you are.

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  12. I guess the “leggings as pants” fashion has bypassed the Midwest. Skinny jeans are bad enough (I detest them), but I only see leggings under skirts. Often the skirts are short enough that I suspect the young lady combined leggings and skirt in order to be modest, since neither would be modest alone, but that works. Leggings alone wouldn’t. The responses to that woman’s letter were mostly pretty outrageous. I wouldn’t have written it . . . the response wasn’t going to go anywhere good, and girls who wear leggings in public aren’t just waiting for someone else’s mom to tell them off in print. But really, leggings aren’t pants, and shouldn’t be treated as such.

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  13. Chas, they used to be called “leotards” when I was a girl. Basically pantyhose made of a thicker material, that little girls wore under skirts before the girls were old enough to wear hose, and that now are also stylish for women and not just girls. But apparently in some regions some young women wear them instead of pants.

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  14. It has been an exacting week, in which much has occurred for me (and much has yet to occur), but I have not forgotten about the discussion we were having this time last week concerning headship and marriage that I had to bow out of due to more pressing concerns. I still have other tasks to accomplish, so I am limited in the time I have to spend on it, but I did want to respond to one point. It was pointed out that someone needs to lead in the marriage. My immediate mental response to reading that point was leadership in a partnership of equals does not have to be always on the part of only one of the two individuals. Each may lead at different points. Furthermore, leadership is not a synonym of authority. It is not in the context of marriage, but there is a Biblical illustration of what I mean in a division of leadership between a man and a woman, in which each leads in a different way.

    The example I am thinking of is Deborah and Barak. Deborah, as a judge in the line established by Moses and begun by Joshua, provided spiritual leadership, while Barak provided military leadership. What is remarkable about their partnership in such a patriarchal society and during a time in Israel’s history when women were badly treated (see the rest of Judges) is how Barak recognizes that equality and insists that Deborah accompany him on his military campaign. In modern times, when Christians, overreacting to the cultural shifts taking place, are concerned about defining male and female roles, Barak’s insistence that Deborah accompany him is interpreted as weakness, but Hebrews 11 lists him as a hero of the faith. That the general Sisera was killed by Jael was not a punishment to Barak for any lack of faith, but rather an ultimate humiliation to the abominable pride of Sisera, that he should have been cowardly enough to hide in a woman’s tent and died by domestic tools (the humiliation to the macho pride of that culture by Jael’s actions is made more apparent later in Judges 9 when the evil judge Abimelech asks his bodyguard to kill him as he is dying from a head wound caused by a millstone thrown by a woman, because he would not have it said he had died by a woman’s hand). Even in their song of triumph, Barak and Deborah are equals, both singing of the victory that the Lord accomplished.

    It is often said, by the reactionary component that criticizes Barak, that the proof that men should always lead is that Adam’s fall happened because God said he listened to Eve and ate the fruit. Yet, later on in Genesis, God tells Abraham to listen to the voice of Sarah his wife in sending away Hagar and Ishmael. It was not that Adam listened to Eve, it was that he listened and agreed to what he already knew was wrong. The words of God to Eve when He gives her the consequences of her actions, that she would yearn after her husband, but that he would rule over her establish that the historical trend across cultures for men to dominant their wives was not the original purpose of God. The reason for male elders in the Church and husbands being the head in the marriage is not due to a greater authority in Creation, but to birthright. Adam was created first (I Timothy 2:13). Christ, as the second Adam and the firstborn of the new Creation, had to be the firstborn and male. But Christ was only born to a woman, and it was by that lineage he called himself the Son of Man. Women are the equals of men, both created in the image of God. Their role of helper is not one of lesser status. The role of elder and head are not theirs not because they have less authority in Creation (the same commission was given to both male and female in Genesis 1), but because they, as the helper of the man, have been, since the beginning, the hated target of the Enemy, for it was the seed of the woman which would crush the head of the serpent. Paul did not permit a woman to be a church elder because she is already the object of the concentrated venom of the serpent and to place her at the forefront of the spiritual battle would be to further single her out – see Revelation 12 on John’s vision of the Woman and the Dragon.

    So men are, in the Church and marriage, at the forefront of battle, which means they will more frequently take the lead. But the leadership prescribed by Christ is not the leadership of the world – Christ specifically says that:
    “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles dominate them, and the men of high position exercise power over them. It must not be like that among you. On the contrary, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first among you must be your slave; just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life—a ransom for many.” (Matthew 20:25-28)
    This the statement that Paul is citing in his instructions to husbands in Ephesians 5, the one where Jesus says that leadership in His kingdom does not look like secular authority. I have often thought, when I read Luke’s list of the women who served Jesus during his ministry on earth, and how the women prepared spices for Christ’s burial and thus were the first witnesses to the resurrection (as they were the final witnesses to his death), and Paul’s commendations of the women who served in the church, that the quiet, unacknowledged servitude of women, whether it is women carrying out meal preparation and child care in some ultra-conservative North American church that insists on women keeping their place or the single woman missionary serving on the mission field sent by a church that insists women should not be deacons (a word meaning servant) in the church, are really the ones who meet Jesus Christ’s qualifications for the greatest in his kingdom. The pompous leaders who continually pontificate about how women should not lead in the Church are blind to how God is using the weak to defeat the strong and the foolish to confound the worldly wise.

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  15. Now I will admit I love leggings….I wear them under longer dresses and tunics. I dislike pantyhose and sometimes tights just don’t cut it with certain shoes. I will wear footless tights or leggings. I have very white legs and on my left leg I have some bumpy varicose veins…not pretty! I do shutter when I see women wearing leggings as pants.

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  16. The word modest that Paul uses in his counsel to women about apparel is modest in the context of cost or quality, i.e. a modest price. Living in a traditional culture that was in many ways similar to the culture of the Biblical era demonstrated to me exactly what Paul and Peter were saying on the subject of women’s apparel. In West Africa, dress is an onerous responsibility for women and many carry great debt (and are even known to resort to prostitution) in order to purchase the right number of new outfits that is expected for weddings and celebrations of their children’s births, etc. When Peter spoke about not braiding the hair, he was saying that a woman did not need to spend an afternoon having their hair braided, as I witnessed women doing, in order to be honoured and respected. Paul and Peter were not prescribing how women should dress, they were removing society’s onerous prescriptions of how women should dress. From the Roman empire, whose own writers complained of the excesses of women’s apparel, to Victorian high societal expectations of women’s coming-out wardrobe and wedding trousseau, to the three sets of very heavy jewelry that is still required for a Hindu wedding, the requirements of society about how women should dress are a continual running theme. Christian women are told they can step away from all that outward show and still be beautiful. What those passages really should be used for in churches is to reassure soon-to-be brides that they do not have to spend a fortune on their wedding dress.

    As for tights worn without tunics, as a younger woman who would prefer to wear tunics with her jeans (I do not wear tights), I can tell you right now that tights are a lot cheaper than tunics. Tights are generally around $10 or less, while the last tunic I purchased was about $40 and that was on sale. What you are probably most often really seeing in the young women who wear tights with shirts and sweaters are young women trying to keep their lives together who get up in the morning and find they have nothing to wear but a pair of tights and a sweatshirt because they didn’t get their laundry done between homework, classes, and their job.

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  17. I would have told that mother who wrote the letter off in no uncertain terms. When I was a teen, another homeschooling mother actually asked permission to cover over the low-cut necklines that were part of historical costumes in a book I had lent her children to read (the book was about William Tyndale, titled ‘God’s Outlaw’ and the pictures were from a film production based on the book). She filtered every picture that came through her doors so that her son would not be tempted to lust, as a good ATI mother. Her eldest son, who was the golden boy of the tiny church, went through ATI’s training program, married a girl from ATI (he was initially interested in Youngest, but my father did not like him and Youngest agreed with my father’s assessment), and had four children in quick order in true Quiverfull style. He was the youth pastor at the church he and his wife attended and his father, the head deacon of our little church, often gave our congregation proud updates. Until, that is, this young man ran off with the senior pastor’s daughter, telling his wife, after she had borne him four children, that he had never loved her. He then abandoned the pastor’s daughter, after his divorce from his wife, and came crawling back to his doting parents, who wanted to bring him to church (the father announced his intention to do so). I approached my father, who approached the pastor (it was then the pastor who later resigned) with the strictures in I Corinthians 5. The pastor took my father’s concerns in good part, despite the fact that this deacon regularly fawned over him (I am not exaggerating about the fawning), and told the deacon the son would not be welcome until he showed signs of repentance. The deacon took offense, but did not bring his son back. A mother who coddles her son by trying to remove all potential temptations from his path does him no favours. It is only by realizing the sin that exists in our own hearts that we see the need for a Saviour. Blaming the actions or appearance others for the temptations we all experience is a devilish deception of our own deceitful hearts.

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  18. I realize now, looking back, that it was my father’s and my Scriptural concerns in that case which some months later led to that pastor’s resignation. Almost immediately after the pastor’s resignation, we learned he had left his wife and was filing for divorce. This pastor had many of the earmarks of the typical Fundamentalist Baptist pastor, including believing in the preeminence of the pastor as the only elder (he often criticized the idea of multiple church elders) and given the head deacon’s fawning, the pastor could well have gotten away with the divorce, using appropriate excuses, and continued pastoring the church – one of the pastoral associates that he brought to speak at our church was a divorced pastor who blamed his divorce on the fact he had been called to be a pastor but his wife had not supported his calling. But by standing firm on the deacon’s son, my father and I had made it clear that we took the Scripture seriously when it came to keeping one’s marriage covenant, and so that pastor knew he had to resign if he was going to divorce his wife, which he did. We at least prevented him from becoming a hypocrite. That church still has not got another pastor, and the head deacon is still head deacon (and treasurer) and Youngest’s spouse is also a deacon, so things are still not as they should be, but had I not spoken to my father, it could have been worse.

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  19. I have never figured out women’s attire. Men and women can go to the same function and the men are dressed comfortably and blend into the crowd and the women seem to be dressed to grab attention and uncomfortably so. I have seen the thongs, and the tugs, and the signs of freezing. Makes no sense to me. Husband says men dress to be comfortable and girls dress to impress other girls.

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  20. I don’t think I have been around ladies who wear the leggings which are thin like tights as outerwear. I have a pair of gray knit skinny slacks and black knit skinny jeans that I mostly wear around home under longish tops. They do give a sense of being able to move quickly and not getting your feet tripped up in long baggy slacks so they are good for doing things around the house and yard. The thing I least appreciate about them is if Miss Bosley sits in my lap and kneads with her claws, that is painful whereas with corduroy or denim jeans, I can’t feel her claws.

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  21. I want to make clear that I do believe there are cases where divorce is justified (the deacon’s son’s wife was thoroughly justified in divorcing him after he so cruelly smashed his covenant) and there is forgiveness for those who divorce for lesser reasons, but Paul is clear that the elders of the church must be committed to their marriages and also condemns the man who abandons his wife, while making allowances for a wife leaving her husband in I Corinthians 7. The pastor left his wife, she did not leave him, and furthermore, it came as a total shock to us who knew them both, because she was a lovely person (in character_ and there had not been obvious friction between them. Also, there is more to the story. This pastor who resigned had previously come from another church and during the time he was at the tiny church, he testified at the murder trial of a former youth pastor who had been under him at the other church and who had murdered his wife, making it look like an accident, after he had an affair. The pastor who resigned properly condemned his former protege and clearly believed he was guilty, but he blamed the affair that led to the murder on the fact his protege had not listened to his advice to never be alone with a woman who was not his wife. So, for him to abandon his own wife, and later take up with another woman after his divorce, after so soundly condemning his former protege and also the deacon’s son, is still deeply troubling to consider.

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  22. Hmm, this is interesting. I think that some of the mothers who are most concerned about “modesty” in their girls are also some of the ones who use the 1828 Webster’s dictionary, as somehow a purer version of the language. Knowing that the proscription on immodest attire was more about not dressing in a flashy way than it was about how much skin is covered, I googled if I could find the 1828 definition of “modest.” Here it is, from http://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/modest . Might be worth some points in a discussion sometime with an overly scrupulous modesty mom:

    1. Properly, restrained by a sense of propriety; hence, not forward or bold; not presumptuous or arrogant; not boastful; as a modest youth; a modest man.

    2. Not bold or forward; as a modest maid. The word may be thus used without reference to chastity. The blushing beauties of a modest maid.

    3. Not loose; not lewd. Mrs. Ford, the honest woman, the modest wife.

    4. Moderate; not excessive or extreme; not extravagant; as a modest request; modest joy; a modest computation.

    I’m sort of “middle of the road” in the modesty discussion. I believe in dressing in such a way that doesn’t call attention to one’s private parts, but in a way that is pretty and feminine. I don’t like seeing outfits that are too sheer, too low cut, too tight, or revealing practically the entire leg. But I’ve come to understand that the modesty police can be extremely hard on the “full-figured woman” and that women’s clothing standards can vary a bit among strong Christians. Clothing is such a personal decision, and people’s motives quite unknowable. I know someone with extremely “high” standards for clothing, and who is in fact quite limited in where she will drive or walk, and she will say with assurance in her voice that young girls who dress “immodestly” are always doing it to appeal to boys, and nearly always with knowledge of what they are doing. But since I’m practically a fuddy-duddy and I’m fairly sure she wouldn’t approve all of my clothing (just because those with super high standards can always find something out of line), and since I’ve never dressed to attract men (other than dressing for my own husband within the house), I’m inclined to distrust such assumptions when they come to other people too.

    My own opinion now is that the modesty police have made the subject so shrill that it’s one that can rarely be safely broached from older woman to younger woman anymore. That is, while in theory I believe this is a discussion that older women in the church should be able to have with younger women in the church (if there is a relationship or respect between them), I think that by the time a girl’s clothing is bad enough that it is really necessary to say something (past the point of “gray areas” or varying tastes), she is likely already to have been spoken to by several different women. Maybe that isn’t the case–but the issue is often so fraught with judgment and condescension that it seems rather hard to take a middle-of-the-road position and still see times when it’s possible to speak into a girl’s life and be helpful. (I personally have done so one time, and I was heard and the girl not only thanked me, but she went to her mother and asked her opinion of the outfit, saying I had had questions about it, and listening when her mom said yeah, you probably need to consider that a blouse for layering and not for wearing on its own.)

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  23. We have a culture in which “pushing boundaries” is in our blood, and fashion does so constantly. But if tight jeans are the only things being sold in the store, is an individual girl really trying to flaunt her body by wearing them? I had a season that I was wearing pants looser than they were intended to be worn, still feeling like they were tighter than my own modesty-comfort level . . . and having to keep a hand free when I went anywhere because I needed to pull them up every few feet. (They would literally fall off after a while if I did not do so.) Is it realistic to tell girls that they are sinning if they are buying the only clothing available, as if non-sinners are making all their own clothes or shopping yard sales and thrift stores? (I myself have rarely had success buying clothes in thrift store–allergy issues in most thrift stores, and I’m hard enough to fit that the chances aren’t worth the effort.) I heartily dislike the way the fashion industry herds everyone into very specific channels at times–like the summer I was getting married and no store anywhere had white shoes (wait, I thought you were supposed to wear white in summer?!) and no store had dresses with sleeves. Completely apart from modesty issues (I don’t consider all sleeveless dresses immodest), I rarely wear sleeveless dresses, since I get cold and since I tend to be nervous I haven’t shaved well enough. What sense does it make that designers would decide to give no choice about basics like that? But it truly isn’t fair to blame the customers for wearing tight jeans, or dresses with spaghetti straps, or whatever the complaint, if that fashion is so completely “in style” that the stores offer no other options.

    Mumsee, I think that women do dress for other women more than for men. But I think women largely dress based on what is actually available in the stores. My own wardrobe is not fad-driven, but that is a very difficult thing in our culture, and I have some unique reasons I am able to get away with that: (1) I am very deliberate about it, and simply do not buy super-trendy clothes, even if it means I have to wait an extra year or two to buy pants or dresses until a particular style dies out; (2) I wear my clothes for many years, so I can afford to ride out a trend; (3) for most of my adult life, my weight has been fairly stable (that changed when I got married for reasons that had little to do with getting married, but it is back to being stable now, just a heavier “stable” than it was eight or ten years ago). A girl who is still growing or a woman whose weight varies cannot buy clothes and hang onto them for ten or twenty years–and so she may well have little choice but to buy whatever clothes are in style now.

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  24. Today I got the police report from Flyboy’s accident Friday night. The guy who rear-ended him had blood alcohol content .19% (.08% being the legal limit). The police must have had reason to suspect drugs were also involved because the report shows a drug test pending. We are so grateful we lost only a car with no damage to our son.

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  25. The description we have of a prostitute’s dress in the Bible included wearing a veil (Genesis 38:15), so the apparel of a deliberately seductive woman does not necessarily involve the uncovering of body parts. In West Africa, women could be naked to the waist without being thought lewd, but visual exposure of the region from below the waist to the knee was unacceptable, making wearing trousers very immodest and ankle length wraparound skirts the attire of a decent woman. In Pakistan and China, on the other hand, traditionally modest women wore trousers and tunics, while it was prostitutes who wore skirts due to the easier access the open bottom of the skirt provided. One of the reasons European culture traditionally had women wearing longer skirts while men wore shorter tunics is that the early leggings you see in illustration of medieval men’s clothing did not go to the waist – they were literally just leggings. You get the idea. There was nothing under either the dresses or the tunics. If you think that is not possible, all I have to say is that underpants are still being introduced in West Africa.

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  26. Kevin, speaking from experience, I would recommend you get a good lawyer. Mine was worth his weight in gold.

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  27. Personally, I would not be delighted to see men walking down the street in tights and jog bras. Maybe that is one reason I never go to restaurants and rarely to stores. Too disturbing.

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  28. Kevin, when we had a similar accident decades ago, we did not get a lawyer. It was okay except the repair was taking longer than first written up, and the insurance company stressed me out in arguing about covering the rental for us. I was rather flabbergasted since we could have sued and didn’t. A lawyer would have kept down our grief, but it would have been awful for the car owner, a landscape business owner whose young employee was drinking and driving and hit us from behind. If injuries had been involved we would have gotten a lawyer.

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  29. Since we watched the Bob movie last night, I have been especially conscious of how Bosley is everywhere I am today. I may start calling her Bob. I told Art this morning that the psychiatrist in the movie kept having a Ground Hog Day as far as Bob (Bill Murray) was concerned in that movie. What great acting. I so glad it could take Art’s mind off the business for a short time.

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  30. Kevin, The insurance company will likely pay for the car to avoid a lawsuit.
    The man is obviously guilty. They want no trouble from that..

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  31. Regarding divorce, since I am divorced, I just want to say that you can be divorced against your will. That was my first question to a legal help line when my husband said he was leaving.

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  32. I expect our insurance company to declare our car a total loss and to give us a check for the value of the car, maybe $2K. Unless they seriously lowball its value I don’t see what a lawyer would do for us. Even then, if it’s a matter of getting $2K instead of $1K, I don’t know that it would be worth the expense of a lawyer.

    I’m not sure what the other driver’s insurance situation is. According to the police report the driver was not the owner of the car. The insurance information is listed as “unknown”, which might mean the car was uninsured, or just that the information wasn’t in the car and the driver didn’t know.

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  33. Kevin, when my Second sibling was hit and rolled when she was pregnant with Sixth nephew and had Tiny niece with her in the car, there were apparently no injuries and the car that was totaled was old. But Second In-law had to fight to get the insurance company to pay for the rental, and the little money that the car was worth, and for the chiropractic treatments that Second needed because the impact had strained her muscles, all while coping with the loss of his own job. Insurance companies do not exist for the benefit of their ratepayers, which becomes apparent whenever calamity strikes.

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  34. There is a difference between stocking, pantyhose, tights, and leggings. Some things call for leggings or skinny pants. I have “skinny” jeans. I wear them with looser tops to keep the visual line in proportion.

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  35. Kim, I have a pair of ‘skinny’ pants – they are made of fabric sewn together with a seam and not just knit tubes of stretchy nylon as tights are. I wear them with a tunic.The silhouette of tunic and leggings is a very traditional and attractive feminine style – other day, on the bus, I saw a lovely young Sikh girl (her brother was wearing the Sikh turban) wearing a gorgeous shalwar kameez (https://www.amazon.com/Fancy-Casual-Salwar-Kameez-SFZ053/dp/B07H391Y7W) running to catch the bus. It was beautiful and modest. She got to the bus in time.

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  36. I don’t have stockings, pantyhose, tights, leggings, or jeans. But I am fine with that. Anybody who isn’t, has their own problems. And there are actually quite a few people in that category.

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  37. Roscuro, did Second In-law engage a lawyer, and was it worth it?

    I wondered if a rental would be covered, but some long-time friends offered us the use of an old car they rarely use any more.

    Liked by 2 people

  38. Kevin, Second In-law did not engage a lawyer because of the amount involved. However, two of his sisters were involved in an accident, which was not their fault and which caused their car to go up in flames, several years ago (before the Seconds were married) that they walked away from but suffered subtle nerve and muscular damage as a result. It was not until they got a lawyer just this past year that they were finally able to get proper compensation from their insurance company. Some injuries are not readily apparent. Something like a concussion from the head snapping back and forth due to impact will not be noticed right away. Flyboy should get a physical – in his profession of pilot, nerve damage or a concussion could to severe damage to his career.

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  39. I was rear-ended once. The body shop couldn’t get the car ready in the 5 days the insurance allowed for a rental. It wasn’t their fault, as their parts provider was delayed in getting the right bumper. When I went to the body shop to see if I could drive the car without the bumper, the lady (owner’s wife) said it wasn’t possible. I told her the insurance wouldn’t cover the rental any longer. She got on the phone and told the insurance company in no uncertain terms that they needed to pay for the rental for another week, period. We got to keep the rental and not pay extra. I felt sorry for the insurance rep, though. I could imagine that poor CSR cowering in fear because of that woman. She was tough.

    Liked by 3 people

  40. When I was in a car accident late at night eight or nine years ago . . . after 11:00 p.m. certain lights in Nashville start flashing yellow one direction and flashing red the other. I was on my way home from visiting a brother who was staying overnight with his wife (on business) at a local hotel, and it was maybe 11:30 p.m. I was only about a mile from home, had the right of way from my side, and pulled into the intersection. I was tired and my reaction times were probably off, but I was the side with the flashing yellow and thus had the right of way, and suddenly as if out of nowhere a red pickup was in the intersection (because I did not see it till right before it hit me, I have always suspected it didn’t have its lights on) and it hit my front end. I sat for a moment stunned (mentally) that I’d actually been hit, and the other driver apparently sat for a moment too, and then quickly drive off. I thought “This is when I look at the license plate and memorize the number” but immediately realized I couldn’t see, and that my glasses flew off in the impact. Which tells me I was physically jostled a bit–but as far as I know I never experienced any problems physically from it. (I was hit from the front left, and my hood was largely pushed in, to the extent my radiator was crushed and leaked its contents.) I was in the intersection, so I drove ahead a few feet (partly so as not to get hit again) and then called 9-1-1. Police were there almost immediately. I told them I was about a mile from home and asked should I drive home, I guess thinking they could talk to me in my house as easily as in an intersection in the middle of the night, and they said no, that would be “leaving the scene” (yes, it would be, but I was asking permission).

    It turned out there was an undercover cop at the intersection (I didn’t know that until I read the police report, which I sent for), so the hit-and-run driver was apprehended. I had just driven past a bar, and it was Saturday night, so it may well be that a cop sat out there every Saturday night for just such things. (That driver wouldn’t have been leaving that bar, but just possibly could have turned left and gone to that bar had she not hit me.)

    I was in a need of a new car, driving a Corolla that was 15 years old and not worth the cost of repairing some broken things. (Driver’s window didn’t roll down, passenger’s front door didn’t open from the inside.) I was praying that the car would run until I had money for a new one, since freelance was barely bringing in enough to pay expenses and I couldn’t afford taking on debt. I don’t know what they based payment on, but it was way more than I could have gotten by selling the car (I think it was about $3,500, plus the person who hit me was supposed to–but didn’t–pay me a $500 deductible), through uninsured/underinsured insurance.

    My sister-in-law had just died a few months before. My brother asked if I wanted to buy her car, which I knew she had loved. He had just listed it for sale, and he told me he could sell it for such and such a price. He told me it would need tires in a few months, and insurance ended up paying me enough to cover the car and the tires, with maybe $100 or so left over. A few years later, we had gone through that stupid “Cash for Clunkers” program, and the price for used cars had gone through the roof. I had married into a household that already had two cars, and my brother who sold me the car asked how I liked it. I said I rarely ever drove it, and he asked if it was running OK and would I consider selling it back–that he had looked everywhere for a car for his teenage stepson (acquired after marrying his second wife). I told him yes, and let him set the price. He bought it for a couple hundred less than he sold it for, and everyone was happy. (He was going to be in Indiana in two or three weeks, so he drove up and got it.)

    As far as I can tell, the insurance company treated me fairly without a hint of a lawsuit. The court didn’t do as well–a woman who was driving with a suspended license (and a minor, a teen boy, in the car) was driving drunk, and fled the scene of an accident. She got ten days served on weekends (for her convenience?!) and was supposed to pay my deductible, which no one expected her to actually do (and she didn’t). When I later saw a billboard on how tough Tennessee is on drunk drivers, I laughed.

    I didn’t ask the insurance to pay for a rental car. I simply stayed home from church the next day (calling a friend from church to explain the situation and ask for prayer)–but getting home at 1 a.m. or so, shaken after an accident, I wasn’t really in shape to drive to church anyway. Then in a couple days a friend from church drove me to meet my brother halfway (he only lived about 150 minutes from me), who drove to me in the new car and had me take him home (I think–or he might have had someone else drive a second car). It was mildly inconvenient to be without a car for a couple of days, but the insurance paid quickly and none of it was a hassle except the shock of being hit in the middle of the night.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. It was nice to see Ricky on the weekend’s R&R thread. Hard to believe Rob is 9 months old already. Wasn’t he just born around Thanksgiving? 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  42. Ricky’s back?

    That should be a song.

    So “Team Rooter” is set to arrive at my house between 9 and 11 a.m. tomorrow. I’ll work from home.

    They’re offering a $44 drain cleaning special that Real Estate Guy thinks just may solve the problem.

    Liked by 4 people

  43. $44 in CA? Wow! Are you sure it’s not an April Fool’s joke? I thought everything in CA was at least $100. Best wishes for you. I guess that must be their way of getting new customers.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. I told “Alexa” to play Pandora…she is shuffling our music list….first up..Nat King Cole singing the Christmas Song….Chestnuts roasting on an open fire…hey…there is snow on the ground anyway! 🎄

    Liked by 1 person

  45. Guess what word has these synonyms: “agile, featly, feline, graceful, gracile, light, light-footed (also light-foot), lightsome, lissome (also lissom), lithe, lithesome, nimble” and has as an example of use: “a —- 75-year-old.”

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  46. Kevin has the answer. Chas gave away his game immediately when he said “spry 20-year-old.” The definition of spry (nimble) should make it a word that can be used of a 20-year-old . . . but it never is. I’ve noticed that for decades, and wondered if it was ever (in the past) used of the young.

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  47. Exactly. I doubt I would have thought of the answer if you hadn’t used it in a sentence involving a 70-year-old. I had forgotten Chas’s reference this morning.

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  48. safely home. God took special care of us all. When we arrive the New Tribes folks said that all of their planes were off flying and the hangar guys had nothing to do. So they asked if we wanted their guy to drive us to a certain store and wait for us. That saved me a three mile walk after I had just been sick. God set the date for this flight, not me. Then, of course, they came back at the end of the day to pick us up. I couldn’t find much so did not spend much. In fact I loaned my cash to others. I drove everyone home, after the guy drove us to and from aviation. When I got to the last home, a torrential downpour started. I waited in the van, but, as it didn’t stop, eventually raced inside. A sweet day.

    Liked by 2 people

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