63 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 7-12-18

  1. Good evening Jo.
    Good morning everyone else.
    I suspect that if I drove up to NancyJ’s house with a garnet Carolina tag on front, I would be met with buckshot.
    😉

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  2. Morning, Chas.
    I just got my newsletter off and sent out. Whew! You look at the pictures and don’t realize how many times I have moved them and cropped them, a little this way and a little that way… and which pictures did I want to include, then what to say. So glad to be done until the next school break. Now to write some long overdue thank yous to some very sweet folks.

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  3. I recognize that orchard with the bird. Cheryl is blessing us with some more of the photos she took on that last week. I like this one, but I already have the little chickadee as my screen saver.

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  4. I was checking e-mail last night and up popped a screen that froze my computer. It wanted me to call a phone number to restore everything.
    I couldn’t get out. It had everything locked.
    But I have ADT (I think it is) protection, so I didn’t think I could be infected.
    Anyhow, I couldn’t go anywhere.
    It wanted me to call a number to restore all my data.

    As I said, I have anti-virus. The only thing I could do is shut down. I couldn’t “ctl-alt-del”. Nothing worked.
    So? I shut down.
    When I restarted, everything was normal.

    I did run a cleaner that I have.
    But I’m back to normal now.

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  5. Morning and oh what a beautiful birdie up there on the header….Cheryl you continue to amaze me with your gift of capturing the beauty of His feathered creations!
    Now Chas you know if you put a Carolina “tiger in your tank” I would roll out the red carpet for you!! Actually I would welcome each and every one of ya’ll to our home in this here forest…. 😊

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  6. If they wanted me to send money to restore data, I wouldn’t have. I have everything backed up for about a month ago and I don’t have anything on my computer worth spending money to save.

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  7. okay, in between working on my newsletter, I read a book today. It was about something called Bal-a-vis-x which involves balance, auditory, visual, exercises. Someone came to visit grandkids and brought the book. I have some bouncy balls, which is part of it. Now I have to order beanbags, but with sand, and I wish I could afford their balance boards. I will talk to the admin at school and see. It made so much sense to me. That is the sort of movement that could really help students. you can look it up by typing the name and adding dot com.

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  8. oh, I just remembered that my day got off to rather a slow start. My kids invited me to join a group on the cloud of shared pictures. They posted 384 pictures from their backpacking trip. It was fun to see them all out in the high Sierras at a lake. I turned on the cloud and looked at the photos, saved the ones I wanted, then turned off the cloud. Can’t afford to have it on. Do you know how long it takes to look at that many pictures??! But it was a joy.

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  9. I think computers and cell phones are a scam. Both are made to wear out quickly, and can be hacked. If you buy a new phone, you have to buy all new accessories, like charger, case, etc. My cell phone has too many pictures, and now won’t update. Therefore, it is slow, and sometimes won’t accept text messages. I need to transfer pictures to a cd or something.

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  10. I was thinking about the event and the fact that I have everything important on hardcopy. Even passwords. But I had to check to see if I have e-mail addresses in hardcopy. I do. But it’s very outdated. I need to clean it up and reprint.

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  11. I keep getting calls from foreign numbers. When I answer, a man says his name, remember me? I was the tech working on your computer last night. I tell him I don’t have a computer and hang up.l

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  12. The photo isn’t perfect because birds don’t take time to pose. You grab the shot or you miss it. Had he stayed there, I would have taken another, framed better, with more of the blossoms in it. But getting the entire bird (not covered by leaves) was pretty good.

    This is a male yellow warbler. I didn’t notice until my last couple of years that warblers came through the apple orchard in spring and fall–but then, I’m not sure if earlier cameras would have done justice to them, anyway. Photographing warblers in that orchard was nowhere near a guaranteed shot. In the first place, I might go out and stand in my yard and see and hear no birds at all. What I learned over time is that birds are active in cycles, and if my backyard had three or four species of birds flying around, that was a good time to go out and check the apple trees, because there was a good chance there were birds in there, too. But standing on my side of the fence put me at a distinct disadvantage, because I could generally only photograph birds in the tree closest to me (too many branches between me and the bird otherwise) . . . and birds (other than, say, chickadees) tend to avoid going to the tree closest to a person. I would “get lucky” sometimes if I was standing still, because a bird would happen to land in whatever tree was closest. But generally I would move up and down along the fence, especially if I saw movement in one tree, and eventually I would be in the right place either to have a bird in the tree closest to the fence or one off to the side of it that I could access–or see a bird in a tree behind the one I was standing in, and stand quietly enough that the bird wouldn’t notice me and it would fly to my tree. It wasn’t a guarantee even then–a tree has so many leaves and branches that can partly obscure a bird, and birds move around so fast. I learned that I might zoom in on birds three or four times for any chance at one of those letting me press the button to get the photo, and might take three or four photos for every one even halfway decent. I’d get the shot just as the bird flew, or it would be out of focus, or it would be ducking its head behind a leaf, etc.

    I understand why bird photographers might set up a tripod and focus in on one particular brand and leaf, and then “bait” that one leaf with peanut butter or with a dab of fruit that will draw fruit flies and birds that will eat them, or whatever. And I myself got quite a few photos of birds in one sycamore tree because we had feeders in the tree and I could photograph whatever birds came to that tree. It’s far more hit or miss to stand near trees and photograph what you can get–but it’s lovely when it works.

    This was only the second time I’d seen a yellow warbler, the first time in these trees. (The other was at a state park.) This warbler–or another–ended up coming two or three days in a row, but I hardly succeeded in getting any photos, and this one was the best. And seeing a yellow warbler and a savannah sparrow (both first-time visitors to the yard) in the last week there was like rounding out my list while I still could.

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  13. I have decided to copy a friend’s approach to scammers on the phone. When you see on the ID that it is a scammer, answer saying “Sheriff’s office, fraud unit…may I help you?”! 😂 she tells me she gets an immediate hang up…..

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  14. Good morning, Nancy Jill, I see from last night that you are planning to come to my house for a visit next spring. I am looking forward to it. We will sit out on the deck and listen to the birds and watch the deer. Don’t forget to lock up your house tightly when you leave.

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  15. Glory! What a beautiful bird! Oriole? We don’t have birds like that here in California where the crow is dominating the backyard with a raucous caw even now!

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  16. Found someone to make my cover for Poppy beautiful–my hairdresser. I forgot she has a degree from the San Francisco Art Institute in illustration.

    Duh.

    No computer, Kessler?

    I get it about the hay being more important.

    How about a trusted relative just to store the photos?

    I clear my phone religiously–nearly ever month–by downloading all the photos to the computer where they are backed up by Mozy/Graphite. That’s the only way I can keep everything working and have some peace of mind.

    You have no idea what a comfort it was during the fires to know I could abandon my office, books and photo albums because everything was backed up into the cloud. Peace of mind for sure.

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  17. I like Nancy’s idea for phone scammers. Our problem is that they are usually to go calls.

    Chas- you did the only possible thing you could do when that window popped up. But now we have Windows 10 at home and I think I was able to get around it without shutting down.

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  18. Sweet photo!

    I read Jo’s newsletter this morning, too.

    I got one of those notices once, too, and was later told if you call the number (which I didn’t) you’re sunk. Friend fixed mine but did find malware on it so it had to be cleaned out. My laptop is getting very glitchy after 10 years, would love to replace it with a newer, lighter model but not this month (or next) after having to get the dogs in for their rather expensive annual exams and with house painting still to complete.

    The entire painting process (we’d only primed the garage and done prep so far) was put on hold more than a week ago when lead painter’s mom fell and needed tending to and then the massive heat wave hit. The exterior painting is going to take all summer, I’m convinced.

    Yesterday was a big day in town as we have a substantial Croatian population (both my MD and dentist are Croatian). I covered the game and reaction at one of our Croatian halls where it was packed, standing room only.

    But now the editor wants me to go back to do the same thing for the final game (Croatia vs. France) — at 7 a.m. Sunday! Argh. I really don’t want to do that but he said if I don’t, he’ll have to hire a freelancer. I haven’t said yes or no yet, but woke up this morning thinking “NOOOOOoooo.” We’ll see.

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  19. I read it Michelle and passed it on to the appropriate parties. Have I not been saying that for years? We don’t allow sixteen year old son devices and we have our reasons for doing so. His addictions to porn and gaming. But the school does and his friends do and his friend’s parents do. He is now home approximately six to seven hours a day, after we go to bed and before we get up. He never eats at home. We see him only at church. Is this what we would like for him? No. But devices have taken over his life and we cannot stop it. We are allowing him to self destruct but with his manipulation abilities, the community will hold him up and then the next one will and so on. Unless God truly takes hold of his life, he is a slave to others.

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  20. Peter, the yellow warbler is in an apple tree, so the blossoms are apple blossoms. It was the tail end of blossoming, so they’re no longer pretty.

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  21. Well, looks like I’ll be doing the Sunday morning game. I may bring my own chair, I seem to be no longer young enough and not yet old enough where people offer you a seat. It was packed yesterday, standing-room only, and the game was long. The room also is pitch black other than the several TV screens and I was juggling a notepad (which I could only see by the light of my cell phone) and a bottle of diet 7-Up.

    Part of the time I was stuck standing in a little alcove connecting the bar & larger main hall, standing right next to a couple trash cans where people were throwing their empty beer bottles (which crashed loudly when they landed on the pile, often making me jump).

    Add to that the fact that I’m not very conversant in soccer (are there quarters? Who knew they were in overtime ?? not me), and the assignment had its personal challenges.

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  22. “Mumsee, likely in passing, fade the statement that personifies the major problem we have today.

    “Devices have taken over his life.”

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  23. Good afternoon. Lovely header. Sometimes it seems butterflies on flowers can be as difficult as birds to photograph, but at times they do settle for a few moments. A sunny day helps with quick focusing, too.

    My trip downtown early this morning gave me more of a chance to notice all the people instead of searching out landmarks as I did yesterday. I went to Georgia State for my final two years when it was a gigantic commuter school. Now they keep building residence halls. There are many more students and establishments geared to them now. We mostly had the student center back in the ancient days. Because of a detour, I have gone by the monstrosity of Grady Memorial Hospital which mostly treats the poor in Atlanta and is where Emory and other residents get to train. This morning I did miss a turn but knew how to get over to the State capitol and back to where I needed to be. That means I went by the church chapel where Art and I got married. I also traveled by the home where Karen and her husband lived with his mother. The house was sold several years back. It now has a ‘Black Lives Matter’ sign out front.

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  24. I have a middle aged friend who insists that playing World of Warcraft for eight hours a day was not an indication of a problem . . .

    I think I told you I spent three days with an old dear friend (and co-godparents) who is an addictions medical expert in the state of Virginia. In between everything else, she lectured me all three days about addiction.

    She said 15% of the population in any country truly has an addiction “gene,” defined by an uncontrollable physical craving. The rest need to be weaned from their addictions and then need to practice rigorous self control, preferably in a 12 Step program for possibly the rest of their lives.

    Those who have that addictive gene need narcotics to wean them from the cravings and need to be in 12 Step programs for the rest of their lives, hands down.

    While de-tox programs start the process, they are not the end for anyone. (See a gazillion famous people who visit them regularly).

    It was fascinating to hear all this and if my daughter gets an interview at Virginia Tech, we’ll both go back east together and spend a few days with my daughter getting the same lecture. My Addictions Medicine physician has spent years in Appalachia, where she says even the churches are helping fight the addictions.

    I did wonder why I needed to hear this–and then three days later spent the evening with a friend telling me two of her sons went to James Madison University and came out alcoholics.

    Since I knew them as sweet boys, that was hard to hear–but based on what my other friend had said, could encourage her the older boy (28) was doing everything he should. The younger one (21) has a long road ahead of him before he, too, breaks and follows his brother back to sobriety.

    Sobering, no pun, indeed.

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  25. Nightingale’s best friend Stephanie’s significant other (the father of her child – they are in a “committed relationship”, but not married 😦 ) had a heroin addiction several years ago. He goes daily to a clinic for a dose of methadone. I don’t know if he would be okay if he stopped the methadone, but I guess he doubts it.

    (Btw, Stephanie is a sweet young woman and a good mother, and she is a believer. But her faith does not seem to affect the rest of her life as it should. I don’t think she goes to church, and then there is the matter of living with the man I mentioned in the above paragraph, rather than getting married. Please pray for Stephanie to be led to grow more serious and deep in her faith in Christ.)

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  26. Speaking of Stephanie, she and her five year old daughter Grace were here last week, camping out in the backyard with Nightingale and The Boy. Due to the high heat and humidity, and the fact that the grill broke, they (we) ate inside, and sat at the table talking for a long time.

    Earlier in the visit, Steph and I were chatting about something, and she joked to Nightingale, “I really came here to visit with your mom.” 🙂

    The next day, after they’d left, and realizing that Stephanie and I had talked a lot the night before, I told Nightingale that maybe we should have a code for her to say that would be a clue to me to vamoose. But she said that was not necessary, which made me feel good.

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  27. Interesting article, Michelle. As I read it, I thought of the primary reason that parents allow their children to extensively use smart phones and computers. It keeps children quiet. Perhaps the root problem is wanting children to act like small, convenient adults, not just for social media marketers, but also for caregivers. The old saying, “Children should be seen and not heard” is still the gold standard of expectation for children’s behaviour, and what better way to keep them in that state than by mesmerizing them with technology.

    I am the youngest regular member here, and while I remember a world without internet, the family/personal computer was fairly common in my early childhood. Our first family computer was an Amiga, purchased when I was around five or six. While there was DOS for doing programming and writing documents (I never did learn to use DOS), and a typing tutorial program that my mother ensured we practiced for a half hour each day, most of the disks we had for the Amiga were computer games: King’s Quest, Wings, Marble Madness, Zany Golf, Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? – the names bring back vivid memories of the fun we had. Our mother required us to complete our school work tasks for the day, but we could choose to play computer games on our lunch hour or after our work was done if we so chose. Some days, we spent all our spare time at the computer, other days, we spent all our spare time outdoors playing pioneer, or building towns in the basement, or playing interminable games of Monopoly, or sewing doll’s dresses for fashion shows, or publishing our occasionally monthly magazine. Computer games were one among many options.

    We progressed to a Windows 95 in our adolescent years, and learned to make use of Microsoft Word, but the Amiga remained the better gaming computer. In our older teen years, the computer had been upgraded to a newer Windows model and Eldest In-law, a committed gamer himself (it hasn’t affected his ability to work, provide for his family, or be a good husband and father), introduced new games to us, and I recall us spending hours of our leisure time conquering the levels of the historical presets on Empire Earth II (there were scenarios for Joan of Arc, Genghis Khan, Barbossa, and William Wallace). ATI had kept us paranoid about the internet, so beyond using email, we barely touched it until I began to have to use it for research when I was in college. I discovered both YouTube and the website of a news magazine called World, and learned pretty quickly to hold my own in an internet debate and was able to find and listen to all those old songs my father used to quote.

    Each of us siblings tried out FB with mixed reviews: Youngest quit it and has never resumed; Second and I use it sporadically and mostly to keep tabs on friends and family; Eldest uses it a bit more but not to any great extent. My take on FB is that it is boring – even the inflammatory political memes get old really quickly. Eldest has Instagram, but the rest of us can’t be bothered. I don’t have data on my phone unless I’m near a WiFi signal, so I barely ever use the thing for non-phone purposes. I have found the computer and the internet to be a valuable research and writing tools, a welcome source of good entertainment (classic music, films, literature, and art are available as well as the more generic stuff), and of course, a gateway to meeting new people, going new places, and doing new things. Certainly, evil lurks there, but that isn’t anything new. My childhood was internet free, but that did not prevent there from being evil influences that crept in, and none of them came from the computer.

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  28. Being the aunt of young people in generation Z, I have to say that even with them, what their parents allow makes a difference. Eldest In-law taught his children from an early age the joys of Super Mario Bros, and the advent of the Wii meant that up to four of us at once could laugh ourselves silly over an accident prone game of Mario Cart. Eldest Niece at the tender age of five or six could beat us hollow. About ten years later, she has all the current social media accounts, and a phone, and a computer, but finds computer games to be unneccesary. She is doing fine. Yes, she has some anxiety, but so did we and so did my mother at that age (my mother at age 16 couldn’t go to the store on her own, she was so shy) so that can hardly be attributed to her social media use.

    The Eldests have a long standing rule on daily limits of game time for their children, and also require outside time as well as school time (they are homeschooled). As the older ones have begun to use the internet more, their parents have put protective filters and passwords to monitor their use. As a child proves trustworthy, as Eldest Niece has, they lessen their monitoring. It helps that both parents are fairly tech savvy. Eldest Nephew is less well wired mentally than his older sister to withstand the pull of technology, and can get angry when he is told to shut his computer off (he does not have a phone); but he has also been able to harness his musical skill using technology to create an album of electronic music, while a creative program like Minecraft lets him build cities from his imagination. Furthermore, his anger at being interrupted in the middle of a computer game is not necessarily wholly due to the technology as my father, whom Eldest Nephew both physically and mentally resembles, also does not like to be interrupted when he is in the middle of something and can get quite irritable. Eldest Nephew also builds cities from Lego and reproduces soundtracks he hears on the piano, so he is not wholly bound up in technology. Second Nephew, while he enjoys relaxing with a computer game, prefers to be outside playing imaginative games with his neighbourhood pals – sometimes he even forgets to use up his daily game time – and his worst moods swings come when he is losing a game of Settlers of Catan (like his father, board games bring out a very competitive streak in him).

    When I see a child wholly absorbed by technology, there is usually a parent beside them who is equally absorbed in their own technological preference. Children need time and attention from their parents. When that is denied them and they are told to go to the technology instead by those parents, then of course, they will receive the more influence from the technology.

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  29. Not so much lately, but we used to get frequent calls from “Microsoft Support” telling us there was a problem with our “Windows computer” that they needed to help us fix. Sometimes I’d get them off script by asking which one they meant. They’d reply, “Your Windows computer”. I’d tell them we have six Windows computers and repeat the question, which one do they mean. Then they’d hem and haw a bit until I told them that I know they are a scam, not from Microsoft, and that they should be ashamed and get a legitimate job. Finally I’d put them out of their misery by hanging up.

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  30. My retired brother-in-law has told stories of dragging those calls out for a long time, giving ridiculous answers to their questions and providing them bogus 35-character user names and passwords. He enjoyed wasting their time and keeping them busy NOT doing real damage to anyone. He has more time on his hands than I do.

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  31. Yes, the internet is a tool, computers are tools, video games are tools. Yes, I played pong and some of my children played Mario and Reader Rabbit. But there are children out there who do not respect authority or themselves and it can become dangerous quickly. As in deadly dangerous. I don’t tell my children to go play on the highway.

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  32. And we have the option available for children to earn time on computers, do their schoolwork on computers, etc. Sixteen year old would much rather play Grand theft auto with glorified crime, sex with prostitutes, murder of said prostitutes, etc. Certainly plays right into his mindset. And so, given the choice of doing research, fun games, or going to his “friend’s” house and playing GTA, guess what he chooses? We could make him stay home all of the time and never let him out of our sight, but we have elected to let him go so he can “work”. I should be raising my children on a mountain top in the Himalayas.

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  33. We got rid of the landline. And I don’t give out my phone number so don’t answer if it is not family or select others.

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  34. Though I am far more youthful than Mumsee, and closer to the generation that doesn’t use landlines, I have been unable to bring myself to part with mine. I always want to be able to call the house and talk to whoever’s home. I’d like to be able to call other people’s houses the same way.

    When Flyboy and KJ were younger and they would go visit Sam and Molly house for the afternoon, I wanted to be able to call Sam’s and Molly’s house to reach them or check on them. If I had to call a parent’s cell phone, I never knew if I’d choose the parent who was actually home or if I’d be disturbing the one who was at the store, on the road, or otherwise indisposed.

    I think we need to get Caller ID on our landline so we can let the answering machine talk to unfamiliar numbers, but I’ll always want a phone where I can “phone home”.

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  35. We did not want to give up the landline but we never answered it, left it to the answering machine and for one hundred calls, only one or two was for us. So, the children bought me a phone and we cut the cord. Well, I had done that earlier with a weed eater but husband patched it.

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  36. Michelle, we had to agree not to buy any Bibles and not to buy any for someone or give them money for them before we went. The price they charged was only a fraction of the actual cost.

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  37. Kevin @ 5:01. Me too.
    The name of the caller is identified on my TV.
    If It is unknown, I give them two seconds to say something, then I hang up.
    I know it is a robocall where the caller has to look to see who answered.

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  38. Interesting conversation about computer games. Our son did the Jump Start series, Camen Sandiego, Sim City, and maybe a Graphics program that I don’t remember the name of. So he never got hooked on such things because he did not have access to all the gaming that others his age were involved with. If anything, he was hooked on reading which has served him well with working toward his PhD in English. Oh, I remember that we had a Peterson’s Guide to Birds type program that he enjoyed, too.

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  39. I must admit that I let The Boy play games on “his” tablet (it’s really mine, but I don’t use it) more than his mom does, when I am childsitting him. (She knows this. I’m not doing anything behind her back.) But to keep him quiet? No way! He keeps up a running commentary on what is going on in his games, and shows me things in them.

    But it is good that he is going to this Rec program. (It’s relatively inexpensive – much less so than a camp – and includes breakfast and lunch.) He’s also taking swimming lessons there for a couple weeks. Today he did some fishing.

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  40. Oh, yes, Sim City. We did that one too. That was interesting. My son that played that the most is the computer guy. I don’t think he plays many games anymore. Nor do the next two. The third might still, it did become a problem for him in college but he overcame it eventually. Some of the others do some don’t but none play or played as much as this one. Though his brother the alcohol and drug misuser did a lot.

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  41. We kept the landline with the hope we would get a call in an emergency.

    Well, that didn’t happen.

    And yes, most of the calls are robocalls which are frustrating.

    OTOH, I realized I never talked to one of my daughter-in-laws because I always called my son’s phone, rarely hers. Remember the fun of conversation with whomever answered the phone? I liked that opportunity to communicate better than merely calling with a reason and having to talk to only the one person who owns the phone.

    Curious the odd things technology changes, isn’t it?

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  42. Every time I get on the computer, like this, I play a game of solitaire or free cell before logging off.
    Don’t play solitaire for money the computer version cheats.
    OTOH, I cheat free cell. If I’m stymied, I go back until I can get past the thing that stymies me. If you try it long enough, you can almost always beat it.
    It isn’t fair, but it’s just between me and the computer.

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  43. Sat through a 90-minute reporter training on how to use numbers & math in our stories.

    My eyes glazed over. I was afraid my head was going to slam down on the conference table after a while.

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  44. Oh ya’ll I got a call today on my cell phone. The first part of the computer robo call was cut off but the rest of it was funny. I put the voicemail on speaker phone for my friend to hear it as well. The guy was telling me I was in trouble with my taxes and that if I did not call this number, the “local cops” would be coming to get me!! 😂

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  45. Carol goes through periods of gaming on her phone — to the point where her phone doesn’t accept texted photos because it’s too jammed up with so many games.

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  46. I also got rid of my landline, I never used it and found I neglected even listening to the voicemails after a while as they were mostly all robo calls.

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  47. Kevin, you touched on several reasons I prefer landlines: “I have been unable to bring myself to part with mine. I always want to be able to call the house and talk to whoever’s home. I’d like to be able to call other people’s houses the same way.

    “. . . If I had to call a parent’s cell phone, I never knew if I’d choose the parent who was actually home or if I’d be disturbing the one who was at the store, on the road, or otherwise indisposed.”

    In our last home, before I married the home had gone cell-phone-only because of a local problem with landlines. We’ve always known we would move from that house eventually, and I occasionally mentioned that when we moved I wanted carpet again (I didn’t like having to take my shoes off in the house, nor walking barefoot and being cold) and I wanted a landline. We got both. 🙂

    One reason I don’t particularly like cell phones is the loss of a “household phone.” For instance, my siblings haven’t had a good chance to get to know my husband because I married late and we don’t live in the same town (the seven of us live in seven states). If they want to talk to me, they call my cell phone, not his. Occasionally he will answer my phone if he sees it is one of my siblings and he is closer to the phone, but generally he brings it to me quickly because after all it’s my brother on my phone. Yet I’ve generally talked to my sisters-in-law as much as to my brothers, because usually I talk to whoever answers the phone (unless it’s someone’s birthday) if that person has time to talk. But we have individualized household communication, and I think we have lost something.

    I also find myself just not making many phone calls. And I finally realized that part of it is I have no idea if I am interrupting something. Used to be, you called someone and they (or a family member) answered if they were home. If not, and they had voice mail or an answering machine, you decided whether to leave a message. Now they might be at work, in the grocery store, or even driving down the road–and they might answer it anyway. We’re no longer talking during our “free time”; we’re multi-tasking by talking while we pick out paint colors at the hardware store.

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  48. We gave up our land line a few years ago. I don’t miss it, but I do realize that you don’t chat with the spouse of the person you were calling anymore. I also refuse to be a slave to my cell phone. If I am busy, or driving or at work and you phone me, I won’t answer. I do like being able to see that you called me though. 🙂

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  49. First thing I ask when I call someone on a cell is “Is this a bad time?” But really it’s the same on a landline, too. And both cells and land lines can just go to voicemail if the person’s busy.

    Years ago, the cell reception in my house wasn’t great which is why I never wanted to go cell only. But that’s gotten a lot better and it was a money saver also to dump the landline.

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