9 thoughts on “News/Politics 10-3-17

  1. But Trump isn’t one of them…..

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2017/10/02/puerto-rico-has-big-problems-but-president-trump-isnt-one-of-them-glenn-harlan-reynolds-column/721191001/

    “Things are pretty bad in Puerto Rico. As Terry Teachout commented, the situation — no electricity, limited transportation, shortages of food and water — is what the United States would look like after a successful North Korean electro-magnetic pulse attack on our grid.

    This has led to the usual political finger-pointing. The press has been trying to make every hurricane this year into “Trump’s Katrina,” for obvious reasons, but the problem here isn’t presidential. As former Navy Captain and disaster-relief expert Jerry Hendrix told Bloomberg View:

    Puerto Rico is an island that suffers from its position in the middle of the Caribbean and its physical separation from the U.S. Its roads were in disrepair and its electrical grid was antiquated prior to the hurricane. The island has also suffered for years from ineffective local government and rising local territorial debt.

    The Navy used to operate a large Navy base there, Naval Station Roosevelt Roads. I spent six months on the island in 1993, but when the island’s population protested the presence of the training range at nearby Vieques Island, the Navy shuttered the base, taking $300 million a year out of the Puerto Rican economy.

    If that Navy base were still there, there’d be a lot more help already on the scene. But as Hendrix notes, it’s not like the administration didn’t do anything to prepare:

    First of all, there was a fair amount of anticipatory action that is not being recognized. Amphibious ships, including the light amphibious carriers Kearsarge and Wasp and the amphibious landing ship dock Oak Hill were at sea and dispatched to Puerto Rico ahead of the hurricane’s impact. These are large ships that have large flight decks to land and dispatch heavy-lift CH-53 helicopters to and from disaster sites. They also have big well-decks — exposed surfaces that are lower than the fore and aft of the ship — from which large landing craft can be dispatched to shore carrying over 150 tons of water, food and other supplies on each trip. These are actually the ideal platforms for relief operations owing to their range of assets.”
    ——————-

    ““It’s a lack of drivers for the transport trucks, the 18-wheelers,” Col. Michael Valle, who is in charge of the Hurricane Maria relief efforts,told The Huffington Post. “There are ships full of supplies, backed up in the ports, waiting to have a vehicle to unload into. However, only 20% of the truck drivers show up to work. These are private citizens in Puerto Rico, paid by companies that are contracted by the government.”

    Politicians and pundits will do what they can to wring partisan advantage out of the fact — see the tweet-fight between Trump and San Juan’s mayor — but that’s just because that’s what they do.

    So what lessons can we take from this experience? First, it pays to have sturdy infrastructure and effective local government. Texas and Florida have those; Puerto Rico lacks them (as did New Orleans, for that matter, at the time of Katrina). “

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  2. You know it’s bad when even NBC acknowledges it.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/donald-trump/trump-s-right-his-media-coverage-mostly-negative-n806681

    “President Donald Trump frequently complains about media coverage of his administration, and a study released Monday confirms his suspicion: Most of it has been negative.

    The Pew Research Center, in a content analysis of the early days of the Trump presidency, found that 62 percent of the coverage was negative and only 5 percent was positive.

    In contrast, President Barack Obama’s coverage in early 2009 was 42 percent positive and 20 percent negative, the study said.

    Among recent presidents, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush had higher negative than positive coverage early in their administrations, but not nearly to Trump’s degree. Clinton had 28 percent negative coverage and 27 percent positive in 1993, while Bush had 28 percent negative and 22 percent positive in 2001.

    Coverage of Trump was primarily focused on “character and leadership” versus policy, according to the Pew Center, a nonprofit based in Washington. The study also showed that only 2 percent of stories from outlets with a right-leaning audience refuted statements made by Trump or his administration, while 15 percent of stories carried by left-leaning outlets questioned the administration.

    “It certainly shows that where people turn for news has implications for what they’re hearing about President Trump,” said Amy Mitchell, Pew’s director of journalism research.”
    ————————

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  3. Let’s be honest. It’s the Obama Effect, not Ferguson.

    https://hotair.com/archives/2017/10/02/fbi-report-making-ferguson-effect-hard-ignore/

    “We’ve already looked at a couple of items from the latest FBI crime report and some of the dark news revealed within. But when you match up some of their numbers with recent historical facts, even more trends become evident. As the Daily Caller reports this week, one disturbing trend can be found by matching up locations recording rising murder rates with the homes of of widespread riots and anti-police protests.

    As we discussed when looking at the rising murder and violent crime rates, the increases are not homogeneous across the country. Much of the spike in those figures is being driven by the shockingly higher murder numbers in a dozen or so cities. What some analysts are now doing is matching up those hot spots with the locations of the aforementioned anti-police protests. The result? The Ferguson Effect is almost undoubtedly real.

    Some criminal justice experts say there is a causal link between the unrest and the two-year rise in homicides nationwide. Heather MacDonald, a fellow at the Manhattan Institute, has dubbed the phenomenon the “Ferguson Effect,” in reference to a rise in violent crime that followed shooting of Michael Brown by Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson in 2014.

    As McDonald sees it, agitation by groups such as Black Lives Matter, encouraged by slanted media coverage, has led to a retrenchment among big-city police forces. Street cops are so worried about being vilified by city leaders and the press that they are avoiding contact with the criminal element, she says.

    “Cops are backing off of proactive policing in high-crime minority neighborhoods, and criminals are becoming emboldened,” MacDonald wrote in a Sept. 25 piece for City Journal. “Having been told incessantly by politicians, the media, and Black Lives Matter activists that they are bigoted for getting out of their cars and questioning someone loitering on a known drug corner at 2 AM, many officers are instead just driving by.”

    Looking at the areas with steep increases in murder rates in this light, the dots pretty much connect themselves. It starts with the crime spikes in St. Louis, Baltimore and Chicago. Who is associated with those cities? Michael Brown, Freddie Gray and Laquan McDonald. The first two cities experienced actual riots. While Chicago didn’t get quite that far out of hand, there were weeks of protests and regular disruptions. The next thing they have in common is the local and federal response. Each area, rather than thanking their police for fighting an increasingly dangerous gang violence situation with limited resources, saw municipal leaders chastising the police for being “too aggressive” or using similar language. Then the federal government, under Barack Obama and his two Attorney Generals piled on, demanding long term reviews of the police forces in those cities with mandates to clean up the police departments.

    Small wonder that under such circumstances, the cops tended to back off considerably from proactive policing, as Heather McDonald describes it. Tired of being blamed for problems and not wanting to risk a lawsuit or criminal charges for doing their jobs, cops became more cautious about when they would get out of the patrol vehicle at times. And the criminals clearly noticed, becoming more brazen.”

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  4. Democrats lie about cause and effect. They can’t admit when they are wrong. When have you seen a Democrat admit that their foolishness was the cause of anything?

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  5. Democrats are not alone in that. It’s been like pulling teeth without anethesia to get Republicans to admit to some of their own policy foolishness. It’s taken a massive upset like electing Trump. And even now, some (both parties) cling to ideas that have clearly failed the country.

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  6. Debra, while I agree that Republicans are not as pure as the new driven snow, but puhlease! Democrats?? They have no ideas that haven’t been tried and found wanting. Venezuela!! Cuba!!! Russia!!! And next, Illinois and California!!!!

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  7. I am thoroughly embarrassed by the man in the White House. He is so disconnected from reality, especially when he kicks Puerto Rico when they’re down. After a disaster is not the time to remind them that they are deep in debt. The imbecile thinks it’s okay, but his remarks are an insult to an injured people.

    I have distant relatives in the southern and western parts of the island and don’t have a way to contact them.

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  8. Good piece by Russell Moore on Vegas:

    https://cccdiscover.com/god-mass-shooting/
    ____________________________________________

    … The first thing we must do in the aftermath of this sort of horror is to make sure that we do not take the name of God in vain. After a natural disaster or an act of terror, one will always find someone, often claiming the mantle of Christianity, opining about how this moment was God’s judgment on an individual or a city or a nation for some specified sin.

    Jesus told us specifically not to do this after his disciples asked whether a man’s blindness was the result of his or his parents’ sin. Jesus said no to both (Jn. 9:1-12). Those self-appointed prophets who would blame the victims for what befalls them are just that, self-appointed. We should listen to Jesus and to his apostles, not to them. Those killed in a terror attack or in a tsunami or in an epidemic are not more sinful than all of the rest of us.

    We live in a fallen world, where awful, incomprehensible things happen. When an obvious and egregious injustice such as this one is done, we should stand where God does and see this as real evil, not as an illusion of evil. This means that our response to such should not be some sort of Stoic resignation but instead a lament with those around us who are hurting.

    … We do not know why God does not intervene and stop some tragedies when he does stop others. What we do know, though, is that God stands against evil and violence. We know that God is present for those who are hurting. And we know that God will ultimately call all evil to a halt, in the ushering in of his kingdom. We know that God is, in the words of the hymn, both “merciful and mighty.”

    When my wife and I were going through a difficult time, years ago, a friend stopped by, a respected theologian who spoke often and well of God’s sovereign providence. I expected him to speak to us of how God was working in this tragedy we were facing.

    He didn’t. He cried with us. He sat with us. He prayed with us. And as he left, he turned and said, “Russell, I don’t know why God permitted this to happen to you, but I know this: Jesus loves you, and Jesus is alive and present right now in your life.” I’ve never forgotten those words. …

    _________________________________

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