58 thoughts on “Our Daily Thread 2-16-17

  1. Is there a Saint Apollos?
    I gather, from Acts, that he was a great preacher.
    But he doesn’t get much press. Nor did some of the others.
    Paul had Luke.

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  2. I spent yesterday afternoon in a flurry of emails between me, my husband, agent and two archivists buddies. One of the people about whom I’m considering writing a biography needs to have papers archived–the organization asked me if I was volunteering!

    Archivists are super librarians–and while this retired Navy wife could probably handle the organization, I can’t and shouldn’t build an archive. All I want is the raw data . . . 🙂

    Counting the costs and seeing where God will lead.

    Today I’m headed to the Flora Hewlett Theological Library at UC Berkeley. Who knew Cal had the largest theological library in the western US–500,000 books?

    (She, by the way, is the Mrs. Hewlett of Hewlett and Packard, or HP).

    I’m reading books by Dana L. Roberts about American missionary women in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Somebody’s got to do it. 🙂

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  3. Good morning! I have not had much time to check in lately. I went shopping for some new clothes as an early birthday gift for Art yesterday, and it’s a good thing I did because the Birthday Tree started blooming yesterday. That was not suppose to happen until March 11th.

    I need to do home chores, but I brought home about a thousand or more envelopes/letters to seal and get mailed. I hope Miss Bosley will leave my stuffings alone!

    Everyone at the office seems to be trying very hard to keep it pleasant. I do get more tired than I did previously because eyestrain is a factor now.

    I need to read what I have missed here for several days. Blessings to you all today as you continue to wander and wonder and ponder ❤

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  4. I just read about Kim losing her desk at work. I do not have a permanent desk at the office. This week I referred to myself as a migrant worker. The people at the office revolve hours around client appointment times so I use one desk until a preparer arrives, then move to another desk, and then move to another when someone leaves. It is good for practicing not becoming attached to spaces. I also am not settling in by having my stuff there because it hurts too much to again pack it up and move out. So in addition to being a migrant worker, I am a bag lady.

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  5. Good Morning….now I love birds, but that trio up there are just something else! They appear clumsy to me but in reality are quite graceful in flight….the Lord’s creation is amazing!
    One of the Elders visited us last evening discussing church membership….we will be taking the new members classes next month and then make our decision….
    My QOD- how important is church membership to you and why?

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  6. I have eaten lamb in the past, in stew, and I liked it. I like feta cheese. That is all I know about goat flavors.

    Somehow I can imagine Miss Bosley being friendly with goats and perhaps going for a ride on a goat’s back. She would dig her claws in and ride a wild bucking goat for fun. Yep! That would be her idea of fun.

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  7. Church membership is very important. It is a tangible way to show loyalty, connection, and support to God’s plan for His spiritual bride (Holy Spirit indwelled believers) and Bridegroom.

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  8. My church will not let you join until you have taken the Class of New Apostles (we are the Church of the Apostles). I think that is very important. You know the doctrines of the church and you agree to them when you are confirmed or re-confirmed by the Bishop. This prevents problems in the future when people are moved into temporary (as I was) or more permanent leadership roles.
    Church membership is important in that you have made a commitment to that church and to support it. You understand their view on tithing. Churches that belong to a larger communion of churches, such as the Episcopal or Anglican pay a percentage of their tithes into the diocese to help with the greater/world mission of the church. Then there are other missions an individual church can support such as a school in Africa or an orphanage in Haiti. A lot of church budgeting is based on membership. We all work for a living and your pastor/minister/priest does God’s work and deserves a dependable salary. Your commitment to membership helps insure that. I know that before I served on the Vestry of my church there were times the priests had to go without pay. There was a businessman who was elected the Vestry the same time as I was who INSISTED that enough be kept in reserves to cover at least 3-6 months expenses. THESE are all the nuts and bolts reasons to belong to a specific church if you are attending.
    The more spiritual answer is up to you. Why would you NOT join a church if you are attending it and have attended it to the point the clergy has reached out to discuss joining with you? My answer is more liturgical in “belonging to a communion of saints”. To love and support each other.
    I am sure there are several who will come along later to give you better answers than I have….

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  9. No agreement with church membership from me. I know the church added to its roles in Acts but I believe I am already a member of the Living Body. I believe I was added to the roles when God made me alive in Him.

    Only one church has ever invited me to be a member and I declined. Turned out well. Husband has joined a couple as he believes it gives him more chance to be involved in the direction of the church.

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  10. If I said AMEN to Kim’s post, it would save lots of typing.
    We are all members of the family of God and brothers in Christ.
    However, I need to belong to a family of likeminded believers.
    We may disagree of some things. (I never agreed with FBCHNC on imminent return.)
    But generally, we understand the Bible the same way.
    And my tithe goes to the church that I belong to.

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  11. Yep, those are sandhill cranes. Apparently they gather in groups of hundreds and thousands in the spring, but I’ve never seen them in large groups. In fact, until yesterday I’d never seen them at all except at our favorite state park–except that one time last fall I saw birds on the horizon at home, in flight, and zoomed in with my camera and took a shot, and the photo was poor but did confirm they were sandhills, Their courtship display is amazing, though I have only seen it on film.

    Several years ago in June my husband and I were hiking in the state park, only my second time there, and four tall stately birds walked across the undergrowth near us and into the trees. I grabbed my husband’s arm, pointed, and whispered quietly “Sandhill cranes” while I zoomed in. I only got three quick shots, and the first bird, one of the parents, was already hidden in the trees. (Cranes have two chicks. The young were as tall as their parents, but were visibly juveniles because they lacked the red cap.) Neither of us had ever seen them.

    One spring at the park we saw a pair, which repeatedly lifted their bills to the air and called in unison. Last spring we saw a single individual–actually, we heard him first, and followed the sounds since he was on a different trail than we were. But it was calling and calling, desperate for another of its kind to join it, and I was able to get some photos. But the park has a lot of undergrowth, and there we mostly saw heads and necks, with brief glimpses of the body as the bird walks around.

    Their plumage is gray, as seen here, but they rub mud over their feathers and over time (as the season progresses) most of their body turns reddish brown.

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  12. Church membership seems to be a fading concept, and I’ve wondered if it’s because of megachurches. I’ve never been part of a church that didn’t have members, but I was shocked recently when I edited a book by a missionary and she made references to missionaries who weren’t members of any church. We’d never consider sending someone who wasn’t a church member to be a missionary, any more than we’d let him be a deacon or an elder (or Sunday school teacher).

    One purpose of church membership is simply church discipline. Just as you don’t spank the neighbors’ children, you can’t fully discipline someone who maintains a status of visitor. Just as it is better for foster children to be adopted, we are connecting to a local family. The elders need to know who is “in” and who is “out.” Only those who choose to be in are allowed to vote on church business or serve in any official capacity. How can you excommunicate someone who is not yours, or send a letter to a new pastor vouching for someone who never was yours? It seems to me that in a church that has membership, becoming a member is submitting oneself to the church’s authority. And it seems to me that a church should have members simply because a shepherd should know which sheep are his. I would not willingly become part of a church that did not have members.

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  13. We have not been an actual member of a church for several years now. It is too long a story to detail here and it would probably bore everyone to death anyway.

    We financially support the church we attend. We are not active in many ways, however. It took me two years to convince my husband to come at all. He is only a paper short of a theology master’s degree and was president of our last church. He was burned out and wary. Both of us are wary. We respect the church’s right to have us not vote and are respectful of positions of authority.

    We were in one church quite long and have both been active in various ways, including teaching in several churches. The last church asked me to come back and teach VBS when they were short of teachers. I miss feeling part of a local body. It is not a comfortable situation, but I live with it.

    Many, many people in our church have been in other churches with us. Many attend, but are not members. Many have had bad experiences with a church or two in the past. Many are wary. That is sad, but that is the reality and I suspect one of the reasons for memberships going down.

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  14. Agree with Kim & Cheryl on church membership. And, yes, I do think megachurches but also “popular” modern-day evangelicalism (probably fueled by the ’60s) has led to the change in pattern where membership in the local church is not considered an important. (From what I’ve read, membership ‘rolls,’ of sorts, were kept in the early church going back to biblical times; there always was an understanding that there should be a mutual accountability for both the church’s and individual’s benefit in faithfulness and spiritual growth.

    I also have always been in churches where membership is the norm, even in Quaker churches (although there were always some who insisted on remaining independent and somewhat ‘outside’ the fold in that sense so they never wanted to take membership). Churches like Calvary Chapel almost prided themselves on being so independent that no membership was offered.

    I woke up again to the beautiful, soothing sounds of the harbor fog horns, I love that sound in the morning. 🙂 Busy day today with a speech to cover and a couple other stories I’m trying to get done for the weekend. It’s been an exceptionally busy week.

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  15. Oh, churches can be messy to be sure. 😦 But it’s also why we need them so much (because we’re also quite messy as individuals, amen?

    Onward we struggle, together.

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  16. But then again that was always the case. Much grace is always needed on all levels.

    Of course, if a church goes off the rails you’re free to pull out (and I’ve done that). But it does help when there is a good foundation and church government in place (another plug for Presbyterianism here) that offers checks and balances to protect both the church and its members.

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  17. I guess I still don’t see it. If I am off track, I would expect my brothers and sisters to come alongside and help me see the Light. How is that different if you are a member? We donate time and money to our church. How is that different? How does church membership make one more accountable? I go to church to worship God with others and to participate in the fellowship of believers. I generally attend the same church consistently though I like to visit others once in a while as I believe they are my brothers and sisters as well and we will all be together worshiping later so might as well start practicing.

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  18. On the other hand, I have never had a pastor ask me why I was not at church last week. Though I have often been able to have a good theological relationship with the pastors (and cannot imagine attending a church where we were not able to chat, though that may happen if we move to Boise).

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  19. We’re all part of the church universal, there’s no argument there. But we also are called to be part of a local church in particular. I suppose like marriage, it’s more a matter of a formalized commitment for mutual accountability. I’m saying I am now accountable to this particular local church body and its leadership (and that relationship obviously is not to be entered into lightly). That relationship can be broken (sometimes for valid and good reasons), but separation is not just a matter of “not showing up” one day and going elsewhere with no explanation. Both sides are called to work through the issues for the benefit of all.

    I knew one couple some years ago who had a very bad experience at a local church and deliberately went to a mega church — sitting in the back, slipping in late, leaving early — just to avoid all of that. In some ways I could understand, but it’s probably not a good model.

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  20. Where are we called to be part of a local church in particular? We are not to foresake the fellowship of believers. And It appears people used to go down to the local synagogue, but we as Americans tend to go to the church we agree with the most. Which makes sense but is it biblical?

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  21. Now if I lived in an area where there were very limited church options, I can see opting for regular attendance (assuming the churches available were significantly contrary to what I understand Scripture to teach).

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  22. Seems like it would be more impact on the community if we all fellowshipped together rather than a group of ten here, twelve there….

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  23. Thanks for this discussion….I am not opposed to church membership per se….I have been a member of the Methodist church as a child…Baptist church and Christian and Missionary Alliance church as an adult. We have been part of non denominational churches with no membership…however, teaching in those churches and leading a small group required classes and commitment to the by laws and governance of the church along with supporting the church with tithes and offerings. I would say the commitment of membership is huge for me…I, like Mumsee, have not seen scripture to call us to sign up to a particular organization within the universal body of Christ. We are admonished to not forsake the fellowship of believers. We are faithful to support the church we attend both financially and prayerfully….we have been committed to attendance and participation. There are some concerns for me and I do not feel as though I know enough about where this congregation is headed to make the committment of membership….I am wary due in large part of past experiences. Prayerfully we will consider taking the “official” step of membership.

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  24. This points to some of what I am trying to say. By JOINING a church (which took up to a year to do because they wanted to make sure you were a TRUE Christian not someone seeking to destroy) you took a risk of persecution and death by joining a church. It is part of why the Nicene Creed reads as it does in the original form
    WE believe —thus identifying oneself with other Christians.

    We believe in one God, the Father Almighty, the maker of heaven and earth, of things visible and invisible.
    And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, the begotten of God the Father, the Only-begotten, that is of the essence of the Father.
    God of God, Light of Light, true God of true God, begotten and not made; of the very same nature of the Father, by Whom all things came into being, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible.
    Who for us humanity and for our salvation came down from heaven, was incarnate, was made human, was born perfectly of the holy virgin Mary by the Holy Spirit.
    By whom He took body, soul, and mind, and everything that is in man, truly and not in semblance.
    He suffered, was crucified, was buried, rose again on the third day, ascended into heaven with the same body, [and] sat at the right hand of the Father.
    He is to come with the same body and with the glory of the Father, to judge the living and the dead; of His kingdom there is no end.
    We believe in the Holy Spirit, in the uncreated and the perfect; Who spoke through the Law, prophets, and Gospels; Who came down upon the Jordan, preached through the apostles, and lived in the saints.
    We believe also in only One, Universal, Apostolic, and [Holy] Church; in one baptism in repentance, for the remission, and forgiveness of sins; and in the resurrection of the dead, in the everlasting judgement of souls and bodies, and the Kingdom of Heaven and in the everlasting life.[57]

    WHAT WERE EARLY CHRISTIANS LIKE
    http://www.christianity.com/church/church-history/timeline/1-300/what-were-early-christians-like-11629560.html
    The early Christian church in the first three centuries after Jesus’s resurrection brought about the most amazing transformation of diverse social and religious cultures ever achieved by peaceful means in the history of the world. How did it happen? What kind of people were these? What was special about their way of living and believing?
    It would be a mistake to romanticize the early church as an age of purity to which we should seek to return. The churches always had their problems and internal struggles. Nevertheless, the early churches as a whole did represent something different in their world. It attracted both devoted followers and brutal persecutors. To see what these early believers were like, let’s go to the sources and hear what they were bold to proclaim about themselves.
    From the First Apology of Justin (c. AD 150)
    First, an early philosopher, Justin Martyr, wrote to the Roman emperor, Antonius Pius around AD 150 to defend the Christians. In the excerpt below we see how the believers were eager to invite the most intense scrutiny of their lives. At the same time note how he reminds the most powerful man in that world that he may not really be as much in charge as he thinks.

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  25. Ultimately NancyJill, only you and your husband can make the decision on whether to join or not. While there may not be Biblical reasons to join a church there are historical reasons. You are the only one who can make the decision. I believe it is important to be recognized as a member of a community of believers. Others don’t. I hope I have presented my information and thoughts respectfully.
    I have attended churches in the past where if I showed up two Sundays in a row I got a knock on the front door Tuesday night asking me to join. I would rather be in the position of asking to join them. That’s just me. For various reasons I am not attending my beloved church right now. I have discussed it somewhat with my priest but haven’t told him the full story. I have the need also to be around women. I need the fellowship of women. I am attending an all female Sunday School class at the big Baptist church in town. I will not be joining that church but the Sunday School class is what I need right now and I will support the church in order to to a part of that class.

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  26. By the way, today’s photos were not taken in any particular marsh, though we do live in a region that is reclaimed swampland. That’s basically just a farmer’s field, with chaff from last year’s crop, but inundated because we’ve had so much rain this year.

    When I told my husband the field had six or eight sandhill cranes in it, near the road, he found a place to turn around. He watched the road for oncoming traffic (it isn’t a busy street, and we had a few minutes before he had to drive on) and I took photos. I was a bit afraid that our pulling over might spook the birds, but this isn’t the first time we’ve had the experience that a Prius is a fairly good blind–you may recall photos of a fox I also took from the car, with the window down. A car is said to make a fairly decent bird blind–not perfect, but birds get used to seeing cars, and they also don’t see the whole human when you are in it–and a Prius in particular, being silent as it sits there, isn’t spooky.

    At any rate, I told him six or eight birds and when we came back, I counted these six, and I got photos of the group as a whole and of smaller bunches of birds within the group. As we were about to drive away, I saw there were two more off to the left, behind and to the left of the patch of visibly wet ground. For all I know there might have been others further afield, but I quickly looked around the field and eight is all I could see. We also didn’t find any in neighboring fields either on our road or the next one over.

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  27. If the church is congregationally-governed (officers elected by the congregation, constitution/by-laws changes voted by the congregation), then it’s important to be able to define who is the congregation.

    Membership also facilitates a certain amount of “vetting” so the leaders know if you’re someone who should be put in leadership roles. And it signifies a commitment and support that can be encouraging to the leaders. But those things can be accomplished without membership.

    I’m not sure if there’s a biblical mandate for formal membership, but I think it’s a good thing, and I’ve always been a member of some church since shortly after college.

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  28. On another note, I was delighted to see a Caltech student named Alex win last night’s Jeopardy college tournament game. He’ll be in the semi-finals next week. Caltech is my alma mater. When there was a contestant from MIT on the show Monday I realized I’d never seen a Caltech student on the show and wondered if it would ever happen. (Caltech has only about 2000 total undergrad and grad students, about 1/5 the size of MIT.)

    Go, Alex!

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  29. I’ve only ever been a member of one church, but then again, I’ve only ever gone to one regularly. 🙂

    About 20 years ago we attended new membership classes. It was several Sundays during Sunday School hour. We enjoyed it, got to meet several other newcomers, and it was led a by Ira Diller, a man I greatly respected. He taught me a lot, both in the class and during some personal one-on-one time.

    In our church, only members vote on leadership posts and church matters. There are some who have been there longer than I, but they won’t become members. But yet they complain when they can’t vote. They know the rules, our church constitution is clear on the matter, yet they won’t give in. I can respect that, but I don’t want to hear you complain. 🙂

    So in some respects, depending on the church, membership is probably in your best interest if you want a say.

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  30. For those who don’t feel membership to be a necessity, I think it does go back to the church discipline mentioned by Cheryl. In my area, liberal as it is, we have had a Southern Baptist congregation accept a woman as senior pastor, and they probably accept practicing homosexuals as members. The became disassociated with the Southern Baptists as the whole congregation. That of course is an example of discipline at the ‘corporate’ level, but if only the pastor or another individual was going around church bylaws and living out of sync in unrepentant sin, then they are accountable to the authority of a group within the church to either repent or be sent away from the fellowship. Yes, we are ultimately accountable to God, but He gives authority on earth to who He desires, and in my mind that includes church leadership.

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  31. I guess another question about membership: whether or not “official” church membership is biblically required may be about like whether or not the state must have a record of a marriage for it to be a legitimate marriage. The Bible does not require the state to record marriage; nevertheless, in our nation, if you do not go through a legal marriage ceremony, then you are not actually married; you are just living together. In Jacob’s day, it was enough that his father’s servant went and found him a wife and he took her into the tent with him. The family recognizing these people to be married was enough; they were married. But it really is NOT marriage today just to live together, and we’d argue with any child who tried to argue that. Mumsee, personally I think that is reason enough for you personally to set the example of actual commitment to a church, though in turn with the understanding that the one you are attending doesn’t sound doctrinally sound.

    Another question about membership is that whether or not it is “official” in the same way as it is today, the elders knew who the members were. Today, that is via membership, largely because people don’t go to one church and one community and stay there for life. What I actually came on here to say was this: that whether or not official membership was required, nothing in Scripture forbids it. And just as parents may set a bedtime, or not, as they choose, and children must honor it if they choose to have one, it would seem to be an appropriate mark of submission to join if membership is expected . . . unless one is attending a church one cannot in good conscience join. In such a case, finding another church (if possible) would seem to be a priority. Example: we have in our church one family who spent a year or more in another church but did not feel free to join because that church would have required their children to be rebaptized; since they could not join there, eventually they came back to us, and are very happy to be back. We also have a family who has chosen not to join because they don’t believe in infant baptism. In my opinion, that is not a matter strong enough to keep from unity over (at least in their case, when they have no infants to be baptized)–but what would they do if one of their children married and had an infant? Could they stay with us? In my opinion, such a family should make a decision–stay and be part of the family, or go and find somewhere that they can. To stay as “friends of the family” but not family for several years is not a good option.

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  32. By the way, membership can also offer additional “benefits” sometimes. When I was preparing to marry, I shopped around briefly to see if I could find a larger reception hall than the one at our church, which only seated a few dozen. One church (too big for our needs, but I looked just out of curiosity) listed prices for use of their facility, a cost for members and a much higher cost for non-members. Likewise, some churches will allow only members to marry in their facilities (and this is likely to become more prevalent as churches gain greater risks of lawsuits if they turn people down–if you’re only open to members, that is legitimate, but you can’t be open to members plus those you pick and choose who are not members). It might be time for some conservative churches to reconsider the old “we don’t offer membership here” argument for that reason alone.

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  33. I know it is not the prayer thread, but I am praying for God to deliver us as a nation from the liberal mindset. I talked to Karen on the phone while I sealed envelopes and she is on a rant parade about Trump. She said she was afraid I was going to be disappointed in Him. I told her not to worry because I put my faith in God and not in Trump. My apologies to Linda for violation of mentioning both prayer and politics on the Daily Thread. Mostly I just feel disappointed in Karen seeming rather wishy-washy. At least when my friend was here from CA we refrained from political talk.

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  34. I want to know if those sandhill cranes will be the ones that show up near my place for the breeding season and summer 🙂

    We’re members of our church. It seems like there are a lot of people who come to our church for a few months to a few years and then wander off to another. I like to think that we’ve committed to our church and by being members the rest of the church knows that too.

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  35. Cheryl!! I thought you were talking about church members and how to tell them apart from other attendees!!! 🙂

    Orange would stand out nicely 🙂

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  36. I used to be a member of the Presbyterian church, but have not attended there for more than 20 years. I would guess I am on the inactive roll, as they would only want to pay apportionment on active members. I would not go back, as they are entirely too liberal for me. When I left that church, I vowed I would never join another church.

    We were active in a home church and in a non denominational church. We paid tithe to the church we attended. Then came the 7 years, after my divorce, where I worked 7 days a week, having 3 jobs. We were part of a Bible study group that met at our house every Thursday night. We ate, studied the Word, prayed, and fellowshiped together. I sent my tithe to various missions. I was very diligent about personal Bible study.

    We now are part of a nondenominational church, attend regularly, pay our tithe, participate in all aspects of church life. But we do not have formal membership. We are all close, and know each other’s strengths and weaknesses. We support each other. We also work on various projects with other churches in the community, such as food pantry, etc.

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  37. RKessler, there are different Presbyterian denominations. Fear not, Donna and I aren’t members of the PC(USA) but of conservative denominations.

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  38. Ah, the action shot is up. I had the camera on action mode, and when I saw wings I pushed the button. Most of the resulting shots had wings in front of one of their faces, but I like how this one turned out. I didn’t notice till it came up on here that on the bird on the right that is landing, you can see the shadow of its rear wing on its front wing.

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  39. A church my sister once belonged to required her to be re-baptized as a condition of membership, as they didn’t recognize her first baptism. (Whether it was because of her age at first baptism — she was an infant –or because she wasn’t immersed the first time, I don’t know.) Anyway, she did submit to the second baptism.

    I’d never heard of such a requirement before, and thought of the Ephesians passage, “one Lord, one faith, one baptism,” though I don’t know that the context of that passage necessarily speaks to that situation. I did have to wonder, though, whether those church officials thought infant baptism is a mistake, and such a person would have to be re-baptized to be saved? Otherwise, what would be the point of a second baptism?

    I’m uncomfortable with a “requirement” like that, for any reason, because I don’t see that as anything Scripture mandates.

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  40. I keeping hearing the stanza “Walk this way” when I see those bird pictures.

    Carol retains her membership in the Mo.. Synod Lutheran church near her former residence but has talked about joining Hollywood Pres since she attends there now. I’d discouraged that, saying it’s fine to be ‘sojourning’ due to circumstances and to keep your membership in the denomination you’ve spent your life in. While Hollywood Pres seems to be more ‘evangelical’ in its outlook, it’s still part of the PCUSA and there’s a lot of baggage that comes with that denomination.

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  41. Besides, her living situation generally changes every few years so it’s not like she’s bought a house and will be living where she is for the foreseeable future. Before long, she could be in another community altogether (or may wind up close enough to her church of membership to go back there).

    We had our congregational meeting recently and it was reported that several people were dropped from the rolls following unsuccessful attempts (usually over the course of several years) to reach them after they’d vanished from attending. But we seem to be healthy, gaining more new members than losing old ones — and we wound up with an $80,000 surplus which is pretty awesome. We’re still looking at church properties to buy as well, but we are glad we did the remodel of our leased space a few years ago, it’s made a big difference.

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  42. I agree with mumsee that an official church membership roll is unnecessary. There is nothing wrong with having one, but for smaller churches especially, it is not a needed thing. When the pastors can’t tell who is who, then maybe it’s time for a roll, but we are all baptized into Christ and are members of one another. I have seen too many churches that claim many members, but only a few dozen show up for meetings. To me, the ones who are there whenever possible and who pay tithes are the members, not the ones who sign a list and “join the church.”

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  43. In our case we make a pretty good effort to keep membership names current — thus trying to connect people who haven’t shown up in a while. Either they’ve moved on to another church and haven’t let us know or ?? But either way, they’re taken off the list. Members are expected to be relatively active and present.

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  44. Good QoD and discussion on it. It’s certainly given me a lot of food for thought.

    On another note, I met again today with the young flutist I’m accompanying. Today was our second and final rehearsal before Contest next weekend. She is great to work with — a very enthusiastic learner and expressive player. Her aunt drove her here today and sat in on our rehearsal, and when the girl and I finished our initial run-through, her aunt clapped her hands in delight. 🙂 There’s nothing like the thrill of hearing music live.

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  45. Both 1st and 2nd Arrows are coming home this weekend. 🙂 Hubby and 5th Arrow have had birthdays this month already, and it is neat that the older ones can both be home at the same time to celebrate the Feb. birthdays.

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  46. Our last church we left over a year ago…we told our deacon and his wife…it was with their blessing we moved to another fellowship. We love our current church (PCA) the fellow believers and the teaching of our Pastor. It is a small church…about 30 families. Recently they have embarked upon an endeavor to build a new building as the current one lacks for accommodation….sufficient but lacking. The architect seems to have sold them on an 8 million dollar project….we are perplexed at the prospect of 30 families financing such an endeavor. A fundraiser coming in and pledge cards have been mentioned….we are not on board with this…we do not have a vote which is fine with me….but, I cannot fathom what they must be thinking in financing and relying upon such a small number of congregants to take on such a debt. We observe and say nothing…we would never want to cause division nor discord.

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  47. Wow, $8 million. That is a lot. We’re hoping to find a mainline denomination church — most of which are shrinking fast — that is ready to either share/leased space or outright sell to us. But property values are so high near the beach that developers can offer a lot more $$ than we ever could.

    Our denomination accepts/recognizes previous baptisms, even from Roman Catholic churches, so no need to “re-baptize”

    So after covering a speech (LA city councilman representing our area) today, tomorrow it’s rain duty. The coastal areas are expecting more than 4 inches of rain by Saturday morning so a couple of us are working late to see if anything floods or otherwise warrants coverage.

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