25 thoughts on “News/Politics 6-25-16

  1. Here’s a little more explanation of Libertarian thought. . .

    “Almost every popular libertarian politician of the last decadeโ€”former Congressman Ron Paul, Senator Rand Paul, and Congressmen Justin Amash and Thomas Massie are all unquestionably fiscally conservative.

    But theyโ€™re also pro-life. Each believes in traditional marriage. None of them promote drug use.

    The difference between liberty conservatives and some more conventional social conservatives is libertarians prefer a constitutionalist and federalist approach to these issues.

    Libertarians believe in letting states decide abortion laws (which is what overturning Roe v. Wade would mean). Before the Supreme Court made its same sex marriage decision, liberty Republicans supported letting states make those decisions or even getting government out of the marriage business altogether.

    Liberty conservatives all support ending the federal war on drugs and giving decisions regarding marijuana legalization to the states.

    These liberty Republicans also believe in religious liberty protections for faith-based businesses.”

    http://rare.us/story/describing-libertarians-as-fiscally-conservative-and-socially-liberal-is-outdated/

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  2. But the current guy Johnson, is not pro-life. And no, he’s not a “leave it to the states to decide” guy either. Sure he makes lip service to it, because he knows it’s what libertarians wanna hear, but he is pro-choice by his own admission on numerous occasions.

    http://www.ontheissues.org/2012/Gary_Johnson_Abortion.htm

    “Q: Should abortion be outlawed in the United States?
    A: Let each state decide.”

    The only way to respect all citizens is to allow each to make personal decisions themselves.
    Life is precious and must be protected. A woman should be allowed to make her own decisions during pregnancy until the point of viability of a fetus.
    Stem cell research should only be completed by private laboratories that operate without federal funding.
    Source: 2012 presidential campaign website, garyjohnson2012.com , Jan 18, 2012
    Women’s right to choose until fetal viability

    Q: You have unorthodox takes, for a member of the GOP, on abortion.
    A: I support women’s rights to choose up until viability of the fetus. I’ve supported the notion of parental notification. I’ve supported counseling and I’ve supported the notion that public funds not be used for abortions. But I don’t want for a second to pretend that I have a better idea of how a woman should choose when it comes to this situation. Fundamentally this is a choice that a woman should have.
    Source: Tim Dickinson in Rolling Stone Magazine , Jun 15, 2011
    Right to choose up until viability of the fetus

    Q: Most Republicans and everyone else on the stage but you identified themselves as pro-life; you have said that abortion should be legal until the fetus is viable. How do you hope to woo conservative GOP voters with that position?
    JOHNSON: I support a woman’s right to choose up until viability of the fetus, as governor of New Mexico, I would have signed a bill banning late term abortion, I’ve always favored parental notification, I’ve always favored counseling and I’ve always favored the notion that public funds should not be used for abortion. So running for Governor of New Mexico in a state that was 2:1 Democrat, I really didn’t get that vote in the primary, but I’d like to think that I got all of those votes in the general election and that’s a reality here also, for those individuals that hold that as their number one issue, I’m not going to get that vote, I would hope to get that vote if I were to move on to the general election.
    Source: 2011 GOP primary debate in South Carolina , May 5, 2011
    Leave the decision up to the woman

    Q: Where do you stand on abortion rights?
    A: It should be left up to the woman. If my daughter were pregnant and she came to me and asked me what she ought to do, I would advise her to have the child. But I would not for a minute pretend that I should make that decision for her or any other woman.
    Q: But you have supported legislation that requires parental consent and signed a ban on partial birth abortions.
    A: I think the decision can be made at an earlier stage. That’s why I don’t support partial birth abortions. I realize it’s a fine line, but I generally come down on a woman’s right to decide.
    Q: Do you disagree that parental consent is problematic for teenagers who can’t talk to their parents?
    A: I believe that parents ought to know. Where that can’t occur, there needs to be a process in place, which we have in New Mexico.”
    —————————-

    Sorry, no sale. Everyone’s searching for a Trump alternative, but this guy isn’t the droid we’re looking for.

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  3. More on why Johnson isn’t even an option for me.

    http://www.ontheissues.org/Gary_Johnson.htm

    “Supports separation of religion and state. (Aug 2011)
    Prostitution is safer when legal and regulated. (Jun 2011)
    I support gay unions; government out of marriage business. (Apr 2011)
    Support principles embodied in the Equal Rights Amendment. (Feb 2001)
    Overturn CA Prop. 8: Let gays marry. (Apr 2013)

    I support evolution; but no federal involvement. (May 2012)

    Bigger border fence will only produce taller ladders. (Jan 2016)
    Arizona anti-immigrant law leads to racial profiling. (Aug 2012)
    A 10-foot wall just requires an 11-foot ladder. (Aug 2012)
    2 year grace period for illegals to get work visas. (Nov 2011)
    1 strike & you’re out for legal immigrants who violate terms. (Nov 2011)
    Let some, but not all, illegal immigrants stay in US. (Nov 2011)
    We educate the world’s best & brightest; why send them back? (Jun 2011)
    Open the border; flood of Mexicans would become taxpayers. (Jan 2001)
    Mexican immigrants are pursuing same dreams we all have. (Jan 2001)
    Share costs of legal immigration between states & federal. (Feb 2001)
    Federal government should deal with criminal repatriation. (Feb 2001)”

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  4. Yes, Johnson’s pro-choice view makes me uncomfortable. (As I’ve stated before, I still haven’t decided who I am voting for.) BUT, he at least believes that no federal funding should be involved, he agrees with certain restrictions, as mentioned in what you shared, & he thinks the issue should be left up to the states, which means he would probably support overturning Roe v. Wade.

    So his pro-choice stand is more personal than political, & his political stances on the matter are closer to a conservative stance than a liberal stance.

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  5. OK, and why do we need to know that other than to pray? I’m like Donna, cynical and I have a problem with other people announcing the spiritual change of heart of people in the public eye. If it’s true–and certainly we hope so–he should be mentored and everyone else should keep their mouth shut.

    So sorry. I’m house cleaning and that always puts me in a bad mood.

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  6. Karen,

    Your reading things into his stand that fly in the face of what he actually says. And no, his stance on abortion is more liberal than conservative. He states repeatedly that he is pro-choice- up until viability of the fetus. But he never tells us when he considers it viable. It’s great that he thinks govt shouldn’t pay for it, but he still supports it. His own words state this over and over again.

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  7. Karen, I like some Libertarians like Ron Paul. I agree with Paul on almost every issue.

    The States Rights position is the correct position on abortion. Roe v Wade featured a federal court overturning a Texas law banning abortion. Most criminal laws are state laws. Murder, robbery, rape and other crimes are defined and punished differently in different states. From a moral position, I would like to see all abortions banned. However, under our Constitution abortion should be a decision left to the states.

    I tend to agree with AJ on Johnson. I’ve tried to watch him but he comes off as a wimp and a weirdo. He beats Trump or Hillary, but he is not up to the level of my current candidate (my son’s dog).

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Anonymous (AJ, I presume?) – What I meant was that the conservative political opinion on abortion would be (should be, if we’re consistent) that the states should have the right to make the laws regarding abortion, & federal money should not go to funding any abortions. Liberal political opinion is that the federal government should run roughshod over the states, & federal money should go to funding abortons. So, from that perspective, Johnson’s political views on abortion are closer to the conservative political view.

    Anyway, I am not thrilled with Johnson, either, but with our current choices, we should at least give him some consideration.

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  9. Michelle – I mentioned twice over on the daily thread (where I’d also shared that) that I, too, am skeptical. I shared it to yes, remind us to pray, & as a “heads up” to watch & see if we see any fruit.

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  10. Today my Grand-Dog and Conservative Presidential candidate Arnold Weaver will be appearing at the opening of a new golf course (Arnold St. Andrews). The course was designed by his daughter, the famous golf course architect Idogka Weaver. This is the same Idogka Weaver that Arnold would like to date if she were not his daughter.

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  11. George Will announced he is leaving the Republican Party. This election cycle has clearly been very painful for him (and many others, of course). I understand and share much of his angst, but question this assessment as reported in this CNN piece:

    “Will, who worked on President Ronald Reagan’s 1980 campaign, also said at the luncheon that Trump as president with “no opposition” from a Republican-led Congress would be worse than Clinton as president with a Republican-led Congress. …”

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Just wrote this on the daily thread, & sharing it here, too. . .

    After reading the comments about Dobson’s comments on Trump’s possible conversion being merely political, I decided to find the actual interview, to see what kind of context it was in.

    Here is the brief three-minute interview. He was approached by the man who posted this, Michael Anthony, & was sharing his observations. Dobson is not 100% sure that Trump is truly saved, but is hopeful. It did not come across to me as any kind of “announcement”, but as one participant sharing his views with another. As Random Name used to say, Your mileage may vary. ๐Ÿ™‚ (But please take a listen & tell me what you think.)

    It is found under Dobson’s photo, entitled “Exclusive: Did Donald Trump Accept Christ?”

    http://www.godfactor.com/blog/exclusive-interview-with-dr-james-dobson-did-donald-trump-recently-accept-christ

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  13. I really respect Dr. Dobson. He wrote several books that helped my wife when she was a young mother trying to discipline our son. Dobson also has stood strong against abortion and perversion. However, he and other Christian leaders are naive sheep among wolves when they meet with talented amoral political con artists like Trump and the Clintons. In most cases pastors should stay out of political campaigns. This is particularly true in cases like this year when both candidates are clearly reprobates. Dobson and the other Christian leaders are about as capable of evaluating Trump as they are coaching an NBA team in the Finals. When they weigh in, they just look foolish and they make the church look foolish.

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  14. It’s an ethical position for many. You just can’t swallow the machinations of the Republican leadership any more, even while you agree with conservative principles.

    That’s why I switched to independent about 16 years ago. I refused to be considered a supporter of a party that declared a quadriplegic candidate for Congress, I think in Georgia, as “unpatriotic” because he ran on a Democratic ticket.

    Those accusing him rarely explained he became handicapped as a result of wounds sustained in the Army during Vietnam. They hypocrisy was too much for me–particularly when many of them had not served.

    I live in California where my vote means nothing, so I was not a significant “loss” to the party, though it is extremely helpful putting some of my high horse liberal friends in place when they accuse ME of all sorts of nefarious political positions.

    I have a standard reply:

    “I’m a registered Independent. I can’t stand either party.”

    Flummoxes them for a moment and then they accuse me of other nasty attitudes because I’m the same religious beliefs of people like . . . Dr. Dobson? His remarks will make my visit with relatives in Donna-land next weekend more difficult. Sigh. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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  15. I, too, used Dr. Dobson’s books and Focus on the Family ministry when I was a young mother. I am grateful for the advice I got when my boys were young. But as they grew up and I gained confidence as a mother, I saw holes in his advice and his book about raising sons was awful.

    (Writing, in particular, was poor).

    I think things went downhill when he began gathering power–or perceived power–in the political world. Then I didn’t listen to him anymore.

    Jesus + power + money = nothing.

    And to be fair, since I’m an Independent, some of the attitudes we see in our culture these days can be traced back to the Reagan era. I remember being appalled by the public display of money, power, and expensive clothes, cars, etc.

    The contrast to Carter’s administration was profound–and not without some degree of warrant–but combined with the prosperity of the booming technology field pushed personal self-aggrandizement and conspicuous money as the best judge of character to an extreme which I commented on at the time.

    It didn’t sit well with me–probably because I didn’t have any sort of status in those days (nothing has changed), and I bristled at the encouragement to spend money, money, money to impress.

    Of course, I was a financial counselor in the early 1980s and I dealt with the effects of willful spending all the time with people who really didn’t have money to be throwing around.

    I guess this just goes to show that everyone doing what is right in their own eyes is never a good admonition for spiritual growth or a contented, quiet and peaceful life.

    ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

    Off to the theater on a very hot day in NorCal.

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  16. I was an independent for some years and would like to return to that — but in California, the GOP primary is “closed” (open to those registered with the party only) and I felt disenfranchised in some ways since I wanted to weigh in on the more conservative candidates running.

    I probably will go back to no party preference soon, maybe very soon (I hear it’s easy to change now online). The GOP will have a lot of soul-searching to do after this (the Democrats, too, but a little less so perhaps — they’re headed far left and I’m not sure there’s enough centrists left to correct that course in the near future).

    The Republicans could wind up anywhere, but I suspect it will be a more moderate-right party in the future (I know, some of the conservatives here think it’s already that). I don’t see a big future for social conservatism as a viable driving issue, those key issues (abortion, gay marriage) already appear to have swung leftward and the general populace, in both parties, appear OK with that — for the most part.

    There will probably be some splinter 3rd parties rising up, but unless they have enough of the general electorate to make them viable, their impact will be negligible.

    So maybe a good time to re-register and sit it all out while things settle down. Or not. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  17. I have never voted for a Democrat in a general election. My mantra has always been: “The Democrat is always worse.” I believe that has been true in every race I have examined for the last 38 years. In 1978 Little Bush ran to the left of conservative Democrat Kent Hance in a West Texas Congressional race. Hance won, helped write Reagan’s 1981 tax law, and soon followed Reagan into the Republican Party. Since that time we have had many bad, disappointing Republicans, but “the Democrat has always been (clearly) worse”.

    Trump changes everything. There are three main factors that have prevented our economy from being much worse since Reagan’s inferior successors took office:
    1. The boom in the domestic oil and gas industry which Hillary and most Democrats are trying their best to derail;
    2. Relatively free trade which has dramatically increased the spending power and living standards of Americans. Trump doesn’t understand this issue and promises to take us back to Depression-Era policies; and
    3. Our ability to attract the best and brightest from Europe and Asia along with hard-working Latin-American immigrants. These people have added trillions to our GDP. This has offset the increasing ignorance and sloth of Naive-born Americans and the inability of Native-born Americans to reproduce. Again, Trump promises to make things worse.

    However, Trump’s policies (to the extent he has consistent, coherent positions) are not nearly as bad as his character. He is an unrepentant adulterer and a liar who flummoxes the press because the vast majority of his statements are false. His rudeness, crudeness and horrible manners are his most noticeable characteristics. He is profoundly ignorant and too lazy to educate himself about important issues. I have seen many two year old who have greater self-control and better judgment. So Hillary is not clearly worse. The hilarious thing is: Trump is also not clearly worse.

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  18. I’m going to vote in a local Democratic primary for the first time next month. In and around the People’s Republic of Ann Arbor there are often no Republican candidates for local offices, so the general election is moot and the outcome is decided in the Democratic primary.

    Since Michigan has “open primaries” I can vote in the Democratic primary even as a registered Republican. Our August election is for the township officers, and I’ll be happy to vote for the incumbents who I think have been doing a great job, despite the (D) after their names.

    It’s going to feel really weird, though.

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